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Dear all,
I'm a french journalist working on the history of WW1.
I have found a photo of french soldiers in Greece in 1915. They are on a ship where I can read "Cory Brothers".
Do you have informations about this company?
Thanks for your help.
 

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Looks like a coal barge/lighter and therefore to Cory Bros. of London who transported coal to London in their own colliers and distributer it in to barges/lighters and delivered it to various places on the Thames, it still exists to-day in tugs and barges but in rubbish.
Cory.JPG
 

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Cory were also into barges and their towage in Southampton up until the 60s at least. I don't know if they are still in Southampton, I suspect not.
 

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Cory were also into barges and their towage in Southampton up until the 60s at least. I don't know if they are still in Southampton, I suspect not.
Corys form South Coast Shipping (Southampton) with sand dredgers using all their coal berths converting the to a aggregate berth all dredgers used the black diamond funnel with suffix SAND(Bird names) until taken over by Ready Mix Concrete (RMC) and now CEMEX. The infamous SAND KESTRAL hit the Thames barrier so all ships had the black diamond painted out.(Pint)
 

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There were two companies, Cory Brothers and William Cory & co, I do not know if they were connected in any way. I worked for William Cory & Co for 3years 1962 to 1965 at that time they had a fleet of ships made up of 4 deep sea iron ore carriers, 2 deep sea oil tankers, 6 coastal chemical carriers and numerous colliers.
 

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Wm. Cory and brothers: iron ore ships - Murmansk run

I worked for William Cory & Co for 3years 1962 to 1965 at that time they had a fleet of ships made up of 4 deep sea iron ore carriers, 2 deep sea oil tankers, 6 coastal chemical carriers and numerous colliers.
Hi William,
My dad was Bill Pascoe, relieving master of the four iron ore ships and sometimes also on the two tankers. He was also master of a small butane gas tanker that caught fire off the coast of Chile mid sixties sometime.

Did you know him?

I have another question that I was looking for a place to post, and will ask you here, if you don't mind: What were conditions like when the ships docked in Murmansk in that period?

I'm writing a book of fiction (for children) and would like to know details.

Dad said, I think, that there was an armed guard at the foot or top of the gangway. A junior officer at that time I know disagreed. Dad also talked about clubs the men could go to - nice clubs with nice girls for socializing (and maybe propagandizing?) and not sex! He said men under 21 were not allowed to leave the ships. And he brought home a few odd things from the store that only foreigners could go to. A seven string guitar. A pair of skis!! I had them for a long time. He may not have bought these himself - he rarely did bring anything home. He did bring home stories though - wish I could remember them all!
Thanks,
Jackie Pascoe
 
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