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Hi All

Does anybody remember them? My records date from 1968 when they only had about 3 ships left.

However they did try to diversify into aircraft and package travel which I believe was their final undoing.

Couple of pics of Tristars the leased attached

Regards

NigelC
 

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My wife has bad memories of Court Line holidays!

In 1974 she went on holiday to Alicante-- Court Line were the airline carrier,in a wide bodied aircraft (probably TriStar).As soon as they arrived, they were informed of "possible" problems with the carrier--then left in the dark until the day of return--then left in limbo, no info, hung around the hotel, overnighted in the lobby as the rooms were relet-- then repatriation via BA to Heathrow ( the holiday had gone from Luton) as the Court Line company had crashed.

But she had a good hols!
 

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My first trip to sea at 16 as a boy was on the Barrington Court in 1960, I was the only southerner with the Geordie crew they always seemed to question my parentage!! Nice lads though. The ship was just out of drydock but we broke down in the Bay of Biscay, spent the day on my hands and knees.
Averaged nine knots to Capetown,the food was grim I remember the 2nd cooks idea of a trifle was crumbled up fruit cake with custard on the top.
We had a return cargo of iron ore for Port Glasgow and most of the crew decamped smartish myself included, it never put me off though.
 

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Halcyon the Great

Though my memory isn't what it used to be, I seem to remember a Court Line master that did a trip with us, as supernumary, on the VLCC Alva Star in 1970. I believe he was to take command of a similar vessel that was building and to be named Halcyon the Great. The names Halcyon Sea and Halcyon Sky ring a bell as Court Line vessels around that time.

Cheers
 

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Remember seeing one of Court Line's Tristars on the ramp in St. Lucia in 1972, they owned the Halcyon Beach hotel there at the time. Another hotel was the Halcyon Cove in Antigua. They were leased by Court line from the island governments who had inherited them when Commonwealth Holiday Inns bailed
out of the Caribbean. Last stay I did in both of them was in 1990 when they still bore the Halcyon name, the Antiguan one still owned by the government and the one in St. Lucia owned by a Dane.. I believe the one in St. Ludia is now part of the Sandals chain. They were pretty good hotels both in condition, management and service.

The day of the banckruptcy, a Court Line Tristar enroute from the Caribbean to the UK had a mechanical problem and landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Passengers and crew were put up in a local hotel. During the night the Captain received a telephone call and was offered a bonus if he could get the aircraft back to the U.K. before the s--t hit the fan. he rounded up all the crew and passengers, put them into taxi's, boarded the Tristar and departed without ATC clearance. Understand they still owe Air Canada for a full tank of gas, which is probably why Air canada can't afford to feed their passengers decent food even to this day!

The following is heresay evidence but from a very reliable source:

At the time of the bankruptcy, "Halcyon the Great" was in Newfoundland and the old man was contacted to get the h--l out of there and sail the ship back to the U.K. An old ship mate, who was an engineer onboad, tells the story of a small Royal Canadian Mounted Police cutter hailing the ship and demanding that she return to her berth "in the name of the law".

Score "Halcyon the Great" 1 - R.C.M.P. 0
 

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I am calling yooooohoooooo.....

[!

The following is heresay evidence but from a very reliable source:

At the time of the bankruptcy, "Halcyon the Great" was in Newfoundland and the old man was contacted to get the h--l out of there and sail the ship back to the U.K. An old ship mate, who was an engineer onboad, tells the story of a small Royal Canadian Mounted Police cutter hailing the ship and demanding that she return to her berth "in the name of the law".

Score "Halcyon the Great" 1 - R.C.M.P. 0[/QUOTE]

I knew the Chief Engineer who was on board at the time and it's true they did the bolt with the writ still flapping on the mast. Not sure about the Mounties saying that though, but it sounds plausible. When the ship arrived back in UK the crew had to put a lein on the ship for their wages - can't remember the outcome.

John T.
 

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[!

The following is heresay evidence but from a very reliable source:

At the time of the bankruptcy, "Halcyon the Great" was in Newfoundland and the old man was contacted to get the h--l out of there and sail the ship back to the U.K. An old ship mate, who was an engineer onboad, tells the story of a small Royal Canadian Mounted Police cutter hailing the ship and demanding that she return to her berth "in the name of the law".

Score "Halcyon the Great" 1 - R.C.M.P. 0
I knew the Chief Engineer who was on board at the time and it's true they did the bolt with the writ still flapping on the mast. Not sure about the Mounties saying that though, but it sounds plausible. When the ship arrived back in UK the crew had to put a lein on the ship for their wages - can't remember the outcome.

John T.[/QUOTE]

When "Halcyon the Great" did a runner, without boatmen and pilot, they sprung her off, just like a coaster. Great piece of shiphandling by the Old Man
 

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The 2 court line Tristars G-BAAA Serial No; 1024 and G-BAAB SN;1032 both bought by Cathay Pacific Airways after the collapse of Court. On one trip out of Halifax to LGW no food was bought on board so what was left over from the outward flight was dished out. We arrived LGW hungry but at least home.
 

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if I remember during the early 70s they ran the Heli service down off Capetown we did a couple of crew changes via them and also had mail drops, was serving on a VLCC at the time
 

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When "Halcyon the Great" did a runner, without boatmen and pilot, they sprung her off, just like a coaster. Great piece of shiphandling by the Old Man

Am I correct in saying that the Captain met an untimely death shortly after he brought the vessel back? I think he was knocked down by a Taxi and killed. If I remember correctly the newspapers at the time thought there was something suspicious about it
 

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When "Halcyon the Great" did a runner, without boatmen and pilot, they sprung her off, just like a coaster. Great piece of shiphandling by the Old Man

Am I correct in saying that the Captain met an untimely death shortly after he brought the vessel back? I think he was knocked down by a Taxi and killed. If I remember correctly the newspapers at the time thought there was something suspicious about it
I hadn't heard of this, I was told of MO of clearing the jetty by a Humber Pilot
who was a friend of the Master about a year after the incident.
 

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Didn't the last Court Line ships names all start with "Halcyon"
Halcyon Breeze, Halcyon Days etc. They liked to paint things they owned in pastel colours.
 

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For what its worth I recall the Barrington Court and the Dorrington Court (not sure of the second ship) had Kincaid H&W opposed piston engines. I am sure I saw one renamed "Eva" on the Clyde long time ago but before their demise.
 

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Court Line.

Hi Gang,
This is going back a long way's,When I was a kid during the 2nd World War,I lived in Port Bannatyne on the "Isle of Bute" and I recall a ship being towed into Kames Bay after having been torpedoed in the North Atlantic,I think she was called the "Kensington Court" A salvage company called the " Glasgow and Liverpool ,Salvage Company" operated out of the River Clyde, towed ships that were disabled from convoys into the Clyde, beached them on the beach at Kames Bay, do repairs to keep them afloat, then tow them upriver when a drydock became available for permanent repairs. During the war it became a graveyard of ships, awaiting repairs or being broken up. Might be of interest?
Neil Mac.
 

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Court Line had an exclusive deal to run charter flights for the Clarkson holiday business and they were keen to buy into it. Court Line took over Clarkson holidays in 1973. H. Clarkson & Co. actually paid Court Line £5.7 million to take the holiday business away as it was losing the parent company money and would otherwise have been liquidated. However, it wasn't the acquisition of Clarkson holidays that caused Court Line to fail. Apparently, it was over-extensive hotel projects in the West Indies.....

The above is taken from "Mighty Things from Small Beginnings", the history of Clarksons first 150 years 1852-2002.

Thamesphil.
 
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