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No one seems to have mentioned taking crankshaft deflection readings. I was a steam man but I did my last trip as 3E on an LB Doxford, and I seem to recall that beside crankcase inspections the CE frequently had me taking crankshaft deflections, with a special dialgauge between the crank webs while the engine was turned over on the gear. And do you know, l cannot now for the life of me remember what the point of the exercise was. Maybe he just didn't like me..............s
The problem with crankshaft deflections on a Doxford is that if the Chief has you take one set on a tanker that is fully loaded, then, some weeks later another when part loaded and then he compares the two it causes him a considerable amount of worry. He jumps up and down, shouts and swears at everyone in range and then goes on the toot. That's my experience anyway!
 

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No one seems to have mentioned taking crankshaft deflection readings. I was a steam man but I did my last trip as 3E on an LB Doxford, and I seem to recall that beside crankcase inspections the CE frequently had me taking crankshaft deflections, with a special dialgauge between the crank webs while the engine was turned over on the gear. And do you know, l cannot now for the life of me remember what the point of the exercise was. Maybe he just didn't like me..............



s
I think you have read the Chief the wrong way, YOU were the "chosen one" to take the readings and he must have trusted you to Log accurate readings rather than 'guesstimates'.
Take it from me there are certain Engineers a Chief will rely on to do that task accurately.
 

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With Bank Line in the 70s we were issued with Crankcase/tank inspection suits, a bit like a moving Turkish bath in a hot crankcase, most people didn't wear them, just get oily! I always kept the lub oil clean though, that,s what purifiers are for!!
I often used to find nuts a bit slack, but whilst with port line I did find a centre top end bearing squeezing out (quite regular on some of the John Brown LB Doxfords). Main problem was getting the spare off the ships side, been there I think since 1936!!
 

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With Bank Line in the 70s we were issued with Crankcase/tank inspection suits, a bit like a moving Turkish bath in a hot crankcase, most people didn't wear them, just get oily! I always kept the lub oil clean though, that,s what purifiers are for!!
I often used to find nuts a bit slack, but whilst with port line I did find a centre top end bearing squeezing out (quite regular on some of the John Brown LB Doxfords). Main problem was getting the spare off the ships side, been there I think since 1936!!
It's a wonder it was not a Wooden Copy.(*))
 

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Only a butchers dog would fit between the webs, I never could.
Today I could get into the crankcase but probably not get out. Call the Coastguard or the Mountain Rescue.
If you watch the film "Sand Pebbles" Steve Mcqueen,Whilst the M/E was running (Steam Resip) with a rope tied round his waist went in the c/c to retrieve a sack and came up the other side.Thats show biz
 

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Sobering reports indeed, their colleagues will take some time to get over the incidents.
I sometimes take a poke at the ISM and H&S when they become bogged down in trivial detail but when the most experienced of engineers are maimed or loose their life it hammers home that no-one can become complacent when working onboard a ship. Safety first, second and third.
 

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Further to GOSLP in post number 4, I have always had the impression that a fliogging hammer weighed about 7 pounds while a 28 pound one was nicknamed a Monday (often pronounced Mundy) hammer as it could only be used on that day. Clearly I adhere to the good old Imperial system of weights and measures. To Alar, post 17 a routine inspection on the MV Trelyon revealed water dripping from the bottom of number four cylinder jacket. This necessitated "only" renewing the "O" ring but the liner was changed anyway as it was so near the end of its life. (Jester) Zebedee.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Further to GOSLP in post number 4, I have always had the impression that a fliogging hammer weighed about 7 pounds while a 28 pound one was nicknamed a Monday (often pronounced Mundy) hammer as it could only be used on that day. (Jester) Zebedee.
The 28 pound hammer was mostly used in the dry dock for loosening or tightening the propellor nuts on the naval cruisers and frigates .When working on a planked staging above the dry dock floor each man was limited to three or four swings at a time. There was always a smart **** apprentice that tries to do more

Bob
 

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I was lucky on one ship that the clever chaps at Dae Woo actually supplied a Bluetooth active deflection gauge which proved very handy.
No need to get in the C/C or stop the turning gear when taking a set of readings as you dont have to worry about oil dripping on the face.
Just make sure you put new batteries in the device before starting out and the only time that anybody has to get in is to attach and remove said apparatus.(Thumb)
 

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Discussion Starter · #57 ·
Talking about confined spaces, claustrophobia is a long time demon of mine and I posted on SN 20/6/2008 under the subject.
This crankcase and engine maintenance now brings to mind the day we had pulled a piston on a British Polar main engine and it was my job to measure the cylinder bore with an inside micrometer. I laid a piece of dunnage and some old rags across the cylinder head studs to give a bit of comfort as I hung head down into the narrow bore to take the readings and all of a sudden the dunnage broke and pitched me forward further into the cylinder. The second and third engineers were standing by while I was on the job and as I started to flail my legs in panic they saw fit to poke me with a spanner where the sun did not shine before pulling me up . I came up red faced and swinging but calmed down before any damage was done but I backed off doing any more bore measurements that day

Bob
 

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I was lucky on one ship that the clever chaps at Dae Woo actually supplied a Bluetooth active deflection gauge which proved very handy.
No need to get in the C/C or stop the turning gear when taking a set of readings as you dont have to worry about oil dripping on the face.
Just make sure you put new batteries in the device before starting out and the only time that anybody has to get in is to attach and remove said apparatus.(Thumb)
Cap Jackson? Wonderful little toy.

Tony
 

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With Bank Line in the 70s we were issued with Crankcase/tank inspection suits, a bit like a moving Turkish bath in a hot crankcase, most people didn't wear them, just get oily!
OhGod yes, its coming back to me now. BP supplied green plastic boilys for working in the crankcase, but I only tried wearing one once even though we were coasting Northern Europe in winter. The main function of the plastic boily seemed to be to channel all your sweat into your boots, which you had to empty out as you emerged from each crankcase door.
 
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