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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am well advanced collating the managed fleet in respect of my research for a book on Denholm (managed vessels currently stand close to 500 know of).

Managed aspects know of :- Commercial; Technical and crew. In the register books, only commercial managers were listed, making it difficult to identify all vessels in which Denholm had involvement.

I am aware by my namesake Capt. W Harvey. that after their collapse, three United States Line container vessels were managed at New York whilst in lay up and indeed have been provided with a photograph circa 1987

He told me that Denholm looked after other laid up of their fleet were looked after in other ports around the USA

My question is, Does anyone remember Vessel names, dates and locations?

Thanks in advance
Bill
 

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Hi Bill 2. :)

I am not certain, but I think there were a total of eight Sea-Land container ships, the SL-7 class. Some were laid up at Brooklyn. Not sure how many of them. The ships were laid up and the US Sealift took them over. The original names were (Prefix Sea-Land) McLean, Commerce, Finance, Resource, Trade, Exchange, Market and Galloway.

I saw Sea-Land Galloway arrive off Ambrose in late 1972. Euroliner (the fastest) was coming out NY. We heard the Galloway on the VHF, "Ambrose Pilots, Ambrose Pilots this is Sea-Land Galloway. We are SLOWING DOWN TO THIRTY KNOTS" We lost the trophy! Galloway had come of averaged 33 knots.

Anyhow, here are some of the details:

Sea-Land Galloway IMO 7226897. Laid up and now named USNS ANTARES TAKR 294


Anyhow, I hope this helps.

These ships were turbine (steam) service speed, 33 knot vessels, fastest ever cargo ships.

Stephen


Water Boat Watercraft Sky Naval architecture
 

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I remember Mike Pride discussing them but I thought they were motor ships not the SL-7s of Stephen's memory (when those on the GTVs referred to the rest of the fleet as 'the Outside'). I remember something about some of their superficial construction being aimed at anti piracy/hijack.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank to you both. Appreciated. Gives me a few more starting points. All in the case of accuracy.
I have just tallied up my current total of managed vessels at 533 excluding the fishing fleet for now that being around another 24 identified. I suspect several\ more lock away in memories
 

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I remember Mike Pride discussing them but I thought they were motor ships not the SL-7s of Stephen's memory (when those on the GTVs referred to the rest of the fleet as 'the Outside'). I remember something about some of their superficial construction being aimed at anti piracy/hijack.
You might well be right. I saw couple of these ships at NY in the 80s. Bill will sort it.

What about POLAR URUGUAY? Mike was looking after this ship when Uiterwyk folded in '83. I had been in the ship in 81/82.

Stephen
 

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No gentlemen, not SL7 class.

They were United States Lines Econ class, and Denholm got a contract to look after them after US lines collapsed.

They were all named with the prefix American followed by the name of an American state.

I think there were 12 altogether, single screw Sulzers for about 17/18 knots and built in Korea.

They were laid up here and there all over the world, and I was engaged to oversee the deadship move of 2 of them from Manhattan to Staten Island, then after a couple of weeks at home, another 2 from Tacoma to Seattle.

I had to see them tied up securely and give a certificate to US salvage to that effect.

The crew was employed from the New York and Seattle hiring halls, US lines provided an American master, and the tugs and pilot did the rest.

It all went off fine though there were a few things.

The ones in Manhattan were clearly visible from Wall Street, American Utah, red white and blue funnels and all.

The guys looking after them in New York were semi retired engineers, and they reported that the draft was reducing at low tide, what could be wrong?

They were sitting on top of the Holland tunnel, so moving them became a bit more desirable.

All particulars believed correct but not guaranteed, it was a long time ago.

Best Regards,

Roddie.
 

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Than you Roddie.

As for the Polar boats, Stephen. I remember those quite well DAST and DARK cargo computers. Largest electromagnetic slip couplings ever made (we were told). Multiple Small process-cooled refrigeration compressors with common LO sump (one burned they all burned). And, of course, Capt .Waldmeyer. Polar Columbia cash to master, two of the largest supers took 50K USD in a cuffed briefcase, not to be outside eyeshot of either, from Glasgow to the Isle of Dogs (therefore Brian Yates and self).
 

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Capt Waldmeyer was in POLAR URUGUAY better known as 'Captain Fantastic'! Best not to make comments. He had left the ship before I joined.

Mike called me about 'hold cleaning' on the URUGUAY. The new owner wanted the holds to be cleaned (full reefer ship). The charterers said they paid for cleaning every voyage and the Master had been paid for it. Someone said the ship paid for the cleaning. Mike asked what I knew about it. "The charterers never paid for cleaning. It was normal work for our deck crew and also on the ship's overtime. Cleaning might a full five to six days for a deep clean. Anyhow, I told Mike that the charters never gave money to the ship. Eventually it was sorted and Mike found that in fact the charterers HAD put the money on board. Good old 'Captain Fantastic' was pocketing the money for himself! The master when I was there was Brian Hills, apparently he was pocketing the money as well. The Bas*ard! When cleaning I was down in the hold for every day all day sweeping, washing humping gratings around. I never got a penny from the OM. Grrrrr!



Stephen
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Gents

Thank you again.
I was aware of AMERICAN UTAH ; MAINE and ALABAMA from the photo Capt Harvey sent me. Having now looked at the sisters, all built by Daewoo at Okpo the other names are NEW JERSEY; NEW YORK; CALIFORNIA; ILLINOIS; KENTUCKY; NEBRASKA; OKLAHOMA and WASHINGTON.

from Stephen's perspective; The Sealand vessels you mentioned; Had Denholm any involvement with them and if so, when? Interestingly, some of the above American prefixed carried Sealand names in later life.

Bill
 

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Bill,
Sea Land. Not to my knowledge. About the only US flag vessels seen outside the US (great thing the Jones act, what?). Until the Chesapeake, ex KOTC, vessels came along I don't think Gleneagle (DSM USA) had bagged any management business. We did get some husbanding business in the way of looking after some US flag vessels in drydock, they were named after French wine growing regions. Dick Swindall went to 'do' one in Gib (I think, Beaujolais?) and regaled us with the result. A Chief whose favourite expression of approval was "Elegant, Dick, elegant" and having to do 'first start' with the aid of burning the smokeroom furniture. That particular relationship ended in a raid by HMC&E for do***ents in Glasgow on behalf of the US authorities. Apparently the owners had been claiming the drydocks were for 'emergency repairs abroad' for which the US government paid a subsidy. They were not.

Stephen,
Not Wilhelm's only sin.

David V
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Another query!

I have the name PHILLIPS ARKANSAS on file as Denholm managed without a type or dates.

Checking my usual sources I can find two having carried that name, so which one it was remains to be sorted

The first was a Swedish built LPG carrier carried the name 1969 - 1973

The second was a Japanese built crude tanker built in 1980 and carried the name until 1991

Anybody know for certain ?

Once again, thanks in advance
 

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Stephen,
Not Wilhelm's only sin.

David V
What about stopping for 'engineroom requirements' in the Caribbean. Three days or so drifting. Saw some Dutch sailing yachts. Stopped the ship to give some 'refreshments' to the yachts. The ship then stopped and they had a 'raft-up' and party.

I was looking through old Bridge Log Books. The Cheng came up for a breather. He saw the book and said, "Ah, when the ship was drifting for three days." The logbook note said, "E/R Requirements". Cheng told me the story. Raft-up, drink, BBQ etc etc. Capt Fantastic. Waldemeyer was a Swiss.

Sin? Nah. :)

Stephen
 

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No gentlemen, not SL7 class.

They were United States Lines Econ class, and Denholm got a contract to look after them after US lines collapsed.

They were all named with the prefix American followed by the name of an American state.

I think there were 12 altogether, single screw Sulzers for about 17/18 knots and built in Korea.

They were laid up here and there all over the world, and I was engaged to oversee the deadship move of 2 of them from Manhattan to Staten Island, then after a couple of weeks at home, another 2 from Tacoma to Seattle.

I had to see them tied up securely and give a certificate to US salvage to that effect.

The crew was employed from the New York and Seattle hiring halls, US lines provided an American master, and the tugs and pilot did the rest.

It all went off fine though there were a few things.

The ones in Manhattan were clearly visible from Wall Street, American Utah, red white and blue funnels and all.

The guys looking after them in New York were semi retired engineers, and they reported that the draft was reducing at low tide, what could be wrong?

They were sitting on top of the Holland tunnel, so moving them became a bit more desirable.

All particulars believed correct but not guaranteed, it was a long time ago.

Best Regards,

Roddie.
I believe American Illinois and American Washington as I also moved from Tacoma to Seattle and then Vancouver.
 
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