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March '58. One of Sir William Lithgow's analyses jars. It seems incongruous that productivity per Japanese head was approaching that of the British head but building times were half that of GB.

Thanks Willie. Good research.
 

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Keep them coming Willie, way before my time I had just started primary school but they make for interesting reading looks like Denholms in the late 50s were mostly ore boats.
Here is a photo of General Terminus Quay Glasgow where many of them would have docked this was taken in around 1980 as they were pulling down the cranes.
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Hi all. Just a few more to post from 1962 and 1963. Then I will follow up with the Denholm Group and discover if there were any more published in the early 1980's.
Here is the latest index covering 96 editions.

March 1954 D
June 1954 D
January 1955 D
April 1955 D
July 1955 D
October 1955 D
February 1956 D
August 1956 D
November 1956 D
March 1957 D
July 1957 D
November 1957 D
March 1958 D
June 1958 D
October 1958 D
February 1959 D
June 1959 D
September 1959 D
December 1959 D
March 1960 D
June 1960 D
September 1960 D
December 1960 D
March 1961 D
June 1961 D
August 1961 D
November 1961 D
March 1962 D
June 1962 D
September 1962 D
December 1962 D
March 1963 D
June 1963 D
September 1963 JC
December 1963 D
March 1964 JC
June 1964 JC
September 1964 JC
December 1964 JC
March 1965 JC
June 1965 D
September 1965 JC
December 1965 JC
March 1965 JC
June 1966 – Special JC
September 1966 JC
December 1966 JC
March 1967 JC
June 1967 JC
December 1967 JC
March 1968 D
Summer 1968 D
Autumn 1968 AM
Winter 1968 D
Spring 1969 JC
Summer 1969 JC
Autumn 1969 JC
Winter 1969 JC
Spring 1970 JC
Summer 1970 JC
Autumn 1970 JC
Winter 1970 JC
Spring 1971 JC
Summer 1971 D
Winter 1971 JC
Spring 1972 JC
Summer 1972 JC
Christmas 1972 JC
Spring 1973 JC
Summer 1973 AM
Autumn 1973 JC
Christmas 1973 JC
Spring 1974 JC
Summer 1974 JC
Autumn 1974 JC
Christmas 1974 JC
Spring 1975 JC
Summer 1975 WM
Autumn 1975 WM
Christmas 1975 JC
Spring 1976 JC
September 1976 WM
Christmas 1976 WM
Spring 1977 JC
Autumn 1977 WM
Winter 1977/78 WM
Spring 1978 WM
Autumn 1978 WM
Winter 1978/79 AM
Spring/Summer 1979 WM
Autumn 1979 WM
Winter/Spring 1980 WM
Summer 1980 WM
Winter/Spring 1981 WM
Summer/Autumn 1981 WM
Summer 1982 CM


Contributions
JC : John Cassels
WM : William Munro
AM : Angus Murray
CM : Capt Murray
D : Denholm Group
 

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Hi Willie,
Thanks again for posting these mags.
I have a few comments on these early mags.

They make interesting reading and the early editorials are written in an quaint old fashioned way i.e. the use of ‘Messrs’ and officers with contracts being called ‘Company servants’, references to ‘officers and men’ some comments look as if they have come straight out of a Dickens novel. Mind you Dickens was alive when the company was formed.

Editorial comments where it said that the company expected to get a better standard of junior engineers due to the ending of national service must have gone down well with all the engineers on Denholm’s ships, who had all been junior engineers at one time. Also I noticed a few comments about substandard work being carried out on the ships basically saying the ships staff were rubbish, or should I say officers and men.

I was amazed at the length of times some of these ships spent in port. A month in the Seychelles loading, sounds like a great hardship but loading Guano, I wonder what the smell was like? (Carronpark 1959) Apart from drydocks the longest I was in port was four weeks in Baltimore (1980) on the Wellpark (the cadet training ship) waiting to unload sugar as a strike on the railways had delayed the unloading. Usually my time in port was a couple of days or even just a few hours

As someone who spent a few years on the GTVs, it is interesting to read about the F.G.T.V Morar coming into service. I was beginning to think this ship was an urban myth. I always heard bad things about it so it will be interesting to read on, through the ‘News’ and find out about its voyages and its eventual demise. For the none Denholms people out there the GTVs used the jet engine exhaust to turn a turbine for propulsion and on the Morar it was a kind of diesel engine (called a gasifier) and its exhaust also turned a turbine.

It was also interesting to see the comments about standardising the methods of recording maintenance by the chief engineer. I still remember the Denholm’s maintenance reporting forms a D80 and D81 one was a tick box form and the other was blank so you could write a description of the maintenance carried out.

The use of Thistlebond to repair a set of false teeth (Sep 1959). Great stuff Thistlebond many ships and rigs were kept sailing/floating with the use of this magical stuff. I never knew that Thistlebond was around in 1959 I thought it had been ‘invented’ much later

Denholms News August 1961 page 5 tells a story of the new ship the Morven where there was total air conditioning in the whole accommodation so the ship was built with no opening portholes that must have be great when the AC went down. Thinking back to all of my times at sea and on ships and rigs it was only a few rigs where you could not open the portholes.I do remember on the Naess Soverign in 1974 the AC for the aft accommodation, where I lived along with the rest of the engineers and the 'men', broke down and even with the port open it was too hot to sleep in the cabin so we carried our mattress's out on to deck and sleep there.

I left Denholm’s in1984 so hopefully some mags after 1982 may turn up.
John
 

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Hi Willie,
Thanks again for posting these mags.
I have a few comments on these early mags.

They make interesting reading and the early editorials are written in an quaint old fashioned way i.e. the use of ‘Messrs’ and officers with contracts being called ‘Company servants’, references to ‘officers and men’ some comments look as if they have come straight out of a Dickens novel. Mind you Dickens was alive when the company was formed.

Editorial comments where it said that the company expected to get a better standard of junior engineers due to the ending of national service must have gone down well with all the engineers on Denholm’s ships, who had all been junior engineers at one time. Also I noticed a few comments about substandard work being carried out on the ships basically saying the ships staff were rubbish, or should I say officers and men.

I was amazed at the length of times some of these ships spent in port. A month in the Seychelles loading, sounds like a great hardship but loading Guano, I wonder what the smell was like? (Carronpark 1959) Apart from drydocks the longest I was in port was four weeks in Baltimore (1980) on the Wellpark (the cadet training ship) waiting to unload sugar as a strike on the railways had delayed the unloading. Usually my time in port was a couple of days or even just a few hours

As someone who spent a few years on the GTVs, it is interesting to read about the F.G.T.V Morar coming into service. I was beginning to think this ship was an urban myth. I always heard bad things about it so it will be interesting to read on, through the ‘News’ and find out about its voyages and its eventual demise. For the none Denholms people out there the GTVs used the jet engine exhaust to turn a turbine for propulsion and on the Morar it was a kind of diesel engine (called a gasifier) and its exhaust also turned a turbine.

It was also interesting to see the comments about standardising the methods of recording maintenance by the chief engineer. I still remember the Denholm’s maintenance reporting forms a D80 and D81 one was a tick box form and the other was blank so you could write a description of the maintenance carried out.

The use of Thistlebond to repair a set of false teeth (Sep 1959). Great stuff Thistlebond many ships and rigs were kept sailing/floating with the use of this magical stuff. I never knew that Thistlebond was around in 1959 I thought it had been ‘invented’ much later

Denholms News August 1961 page 5 tells a story of the new ship the Morven where there was total air conditioning in the whole accommodation so the ship was built with no opening portholes that must have be great when the AC went down. Thinking back to all of my times at sea and on ships and rigs it was only a few rigs where you could not open the portholes.I do remember on the Naess Soverign in 1974 the AC for the aft accommodation, where I lived along with the rest of the engineers and the 'men', broke down and even with the port open it was too hot to sleep in the cabin so we carried our mattress's out on to deck and sleep there.

I left Denholm’s in1984 so hopefully some mags after 1982 may turn up.
John
Hi John. Thanks your comments. Hope to see more from other members. Though well before my time these older Denholm News make fascinating reading. Hats off to the these earlier generations of officers and seamen. Times were tough but at least the pace of life was perhaps a wee bit slower (life before bridge control, GP manning, UMS, GPS, internet and mobile phones etc).
 

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Keep them coming Willie, way before my time I had just started primary school but they make for interesting reading looks like Denholms in the late 50s were mostly ore boats.
Here is a photo of General Terminus Quay Glasgow where many of them would have docked this was taken in around 1980 as they were pulling down the cranes.
View attachment 688541 0.
Great photo John. Please keep them coming.
 
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