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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
was it just in hull that a new larker on trawlers had to buy a donkeys breakfast .on the way to your ship the taxi would stop at the dock store and you had to buy your bed ,gutting knife,and waterproofs etc.this would be taken out of your wages on landing three or four weeks later .the donkeys breakfast consisted of a thin mattress,stuffed with straw and when you changed ships you took it with you,inthem days there was many a drunken man walking about the dock with a donkeys breakfast under his arm.and by the way the trawler owners owned the store....double bubble for them regards colin r . hi freo my wife helped me with this...i think this used to happen in the 40s and 50s and maybe the 60s .
 

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The cloth is called 'ticking'. From an old word tick meaning a sack, which was originally canvas.
It is a heavy tightly woven cotton fabric in a herringbone weave which is traditionally striped. It was supposed to keep the bedding material from poking through.
The name palliasse comes from the French 'paille' - straw.
 

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Thank you Malcolm for the details, I was only 16 years old when I slept on my first one and after 6 months of use I left it behind and joined a Bank Line Boat and came up in the world a nd got to sleep on Bank Line mattress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Also known as a paillasse. My first coaster I slept on one, straw would stick in your side and the dust from the straw would make you sneeze.. Yes I remember them well, also the colored stripes they came in.
what year was that ,was you on nelsons ship?
Thank you Malcolm for the details, I was only 16 years old when I slept on my first one and after 6 months of use I left it behind and joined a Bank Line Boat and came up in the world a nd got to sleep on Bank Line mattress.
did you have to buy it .hull trawlermen had to pay for it.....rusty trawler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
it is said that hull taxi drivers, would drop you next to your ship ,give you a hand with your donkey ,cases of beer ,rum ,wet gear etc ,sometimes you might have to clamber over three ships decks,to get to your ship the taxi driverwould be invited down below for a drink,and a hand or two of cards,the rum wouldcome out and a great time was had ...it is said that many a hull taxi driver ,ended up in iceland gutting fish,no breathaliser in them days ,and no turning the ship round .colin r.
 

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what year was that ,was you on nelsons ship?

No I dont go back that far, but I am getting longer in the teeth, it was 1947.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
what year was that ,was you on nelsons ship?

No I dont go back that far, but I am getting longer in the teeth, it was 1947.
that was the year my dad did his national service,in the royal navy ,idont know where he was but he told me he used to see prince philip most days buzzing about in his red sports car, he did some of his time on a ship called h m s barkis.regards colin r....as you are from wales,you may rember the milford trawlers,dad sailed on the milford dukearound 1950 he was about 20 at that time regards colin r.
 

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!953 I found one on my bunk on joining. Not a great memory.Nor was sleep helped by the huge chain steering clanking away outside my door. Would I swap the experience - NO!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
!953 I found one on my bunk on joining. Not a great memory.Nor was sleep helped by the huge chain steering clanking away outside my door. Would I swap the experience - NO!
i hope your donkey was a dry one regards colin r. talking about stearing i think it was on the brucella H291 IN 1970 as leaving the humber,my dad was chief,the cook had changed his mind about going fishing in the white sea ,after having the big drink the cook took an axe to the stearing gear ,they got towed backto dock.i used to have a copy of what happend,it was in the hull daily mail,you would not want that man on your ship.colin r
 

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i hope your donkey was a dry one regards colin r. talking about stearing i think it was on the brucella H291 IN 1970 as leaving the humber,my dad was chief,the cook had changed his mind about going fishing in the white sea ,after having the big drink the cook took an axe to the stearing gear ,they got towed backto dock.i used to have a copy of what happend,it was in the hull daily mail,you would not want that man on your ship.colin r
Taking an axe to the chain gear I am talking about would only have resulted in a broken axe.
 

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My Dad was the engineer on the Star of Scotland out of Aberdeen, in the 1950's, and he slept on a donkeys breakfast too. He spent 5 weeks at sea up by the Faroes, spewing every couple of minutes by the sound of it. And, he didn't get much sleep on the straw bed either! My Mum said he came back skin and bone. Dad went back to Salvesons and went whaling on something bigger - 20,000 odd tons bigger! Thanks for jogging that memory for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
My Dad was the engineer on the Star of Scotland out of Aberdeen, in the 1950's, and he slept on a donkeys breakfast too. He spent 5 weeks at sea up by the Faroes, spewing every couple of minutes by the sound of it. And, he didn't get much sleep on the straw bed either! My Mum said he came back skin and bone. Dad went back to Salvesons and went whaling on something bigger - 20,000 odd tons bigger! Thanks for jogging that memory for me.
my dad was also an engineer on hull trawlers , he would pass the Faroes every three weeks on the way up to Icelend ,or Greenland He started in 1947, and retierd in 1995.He said he bought lots of donkeys breakfast's,regards colin r
 

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my dad was also an engineer on hull trawlers , he would pass the Faroes every three weeks on the way up to Icelend ,or Greenland He started in 1947, and retierd in 1995.He said he bought lots of donkeys breakfast's,regards colin r
That's a long career in tough conditions! He's obviously made of sterner stuff than my Dad. How did you get on with him being away so much?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
That's a long career in tough conditions! He's obviously made of sterner stuff than my Dad. How did you get on with him being away so much?
my dad worked for the same company for 47 years,he started on hull trawlers in1948 and retierd in 95 .in the late 50s j marr &son started using freezer trawlers and fishing around newfoundland.sometimes he was away twelve weeks and home for ten days,and out of the ten days off he had to go down the dock for two days,as he was chief it was hard to watch my mum and dad parting,she spent most of her time worrying when he was away at sea .most winters hull ships were lost......can i recommend a book for you to read it's called the luckiest thirteen by b lavery.regards colin r
 
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