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The La Pampa (buries Markes) was also a 3 cylinder doxford 1950-55.I only stood by her and was resting from a 6cylinder job.Only half the trouble I thought.
Jim Garnett
 

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I was deck apprentice on the Furness Withy mv Sagamore in 1959. She had a 4 cyl. Doxford. From the deck point of view it was matter of faith when docking with a full load of ore that the engine room could actually start it in reverse when we wanted to stop. It had after all a direct drive, and if I remember rightly we ran it at 104 rpm most of the time.
 

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Thr mechano version probably has more nuts and bolts than the real thing, but I prefer the model tool kit especially if I have to fetch the spanners
 

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3 Legged Doxford

I am researching details of 3-cylinder Doxford Engines built prior to turboblowers becoming standard about 1940.
A few main features I've found out so far but need verification: 1. They are famous for economy (helped win the battle of the Atlantic). 2. The throw of the crank for the Upper Cylinder was half the throw for the Lower Cylinder. 3. Some may have had open crankcases. 4. The scavenge pump was driven by a pair of parallel levers connected to the upper No 2 cylinder con rods. 5. Their Engine Frames were cast rather than fabricated.
I've been trawling the www for details so I can build a representative model. There must have been hundreds of these 3-legged Doxfords built but now its hard to find enough drawings to show how they were made and operated.
I'd be very appreciative if any reader could throw some light on this not-too-distant piece of Marine Engineering history.
best regards,
Jolee
Hi Jolee
If you send me a personal message with your address I will mail a CD with a set of drawings for a 1930/40s Doxford 50/1 scale 60LB3
engine.
The original bore was 600m/m.
To get an idea of the finished job see the avatar used by averheijden which is a photo of the engine.
Best reghards
Hamish.
 

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There was a 3 cylinder Doxford on at least 1 of the following China Nav. ships ..... Shansi, Soochow, Szechuan, Sinkiang all built UK 1945/46
Dear Sir,
I can not find that one of them had a 3-legged DOXFORD see the following links

SINKIANG
http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=19305

SOOCHOW
http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=2129

SHANSI
http://www.clydesite.co.uk/clydebuilt/viewship.asp?id=19307

Szechuen (had Sulzer Engines)
http://www.ssmaritime.com/CN-Anking-Anshun.htm

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters
 

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Then one of the sources is wrong.

I sailed on Shansi and Soochow and one of them was a 3-cyl Doxford but I can't remember which.
 

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The China Nav vessel MV Chefoo (sp) which was on the Papua New Guinea service out of Sydney about 1970 and renamed Island Chief was 3 cyl Doxford. She was built in Hong Kong at the company shipyard and the engine was also built at Taikoo yard. The neatest, trouble free Doxford that I sailed on. 6 months on her and not one stoppage
Didn't they have a ship called the New Guinea Chief also HK built ex ??
 

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MV Soochow 3 cyl Doxford 20 1/2" x 81 7/8ths" built by Doxfords. Ship built by A & J Inglis Glasgow. The other 3 had 4 cylinder diesels.
 

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MV Soochow 3 cyl Doxford 20 1/2" x 81 7/8ths" built by Doxfords. Ship built by A & J Inglis Glasgow. The other 3 had 4 cylinder diesels.
Probably you mean this one?

But not a 3-Legged




Picture as “ms STRAITS STAR”
http://www.shipspotting.com/gallery/photo.php?lid=1247280

So far as I know on this moment TAIKOO DOCKYARD built only this type of DOXFORD
670 LB4, 4500 BHP, at 115 rpm, not a Mushroom Type , but with 2 attached lever driven scavenging pumps

Here a model made by the TAIKOO people


Is that correct?, if not please let me know, I am working on a list from Taikoo Doxford’s and CNC

Regards
Alfons
http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters


PS: It looks to me, that no pictures are allowed on this Topic?
 

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I was always told that Doxford's demise was down to NO them having licensee builders. Obvious from this not completely true. Can anyone expand on this? David V

(Sorry idiotic typo!)
 

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I was under the impression that the classic Doxford was a victim of it's own design in that the crankshaft was unable to handle the increasing horsepower of it's rivals and they reached the design limit.
Still a wonderful engine and a famous part of maritime history.
 

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Ellermans "City of Bristol" (ex Sacremanto) had twin screw 3 cylinder Doxfords. The engines were installed displaced by one cylinder as their side scavenge pumps were on centre cylinder. Built by Cammell Laird 1945, 670mm bore I think. The 'wrong way' alarm was in very frequent use during manoeuvring !
 

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Didn't they have a ship called the New Guinea Chief also HK built ex ??
Yes they did. I sailed on her. Sydney/Brisbane/Port Moresby/Madang/Lae/Wewak then back to Sydney to start all over again. Great times on a good run. She was a Doxford and built if memory serves me correctly in HK. I think she was originally the Kwangsi but may be wrong
 

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I was under the impression that the classic Doxford was a victim of it's own design in that the crankshaft was unable to handle the increasing horsepower of it's rivals and they reached the design limit.
Still a wonderful engine and a famous part of maritime history.
That's always been my opinion because there are only 4 ways to increase the power of a reciprocating engine:

1) Increase the cylinder diameter but this increases the distance between the main bearing centres, in the case of a Doxford this distance is already large because of the presence of the side rods and bearings. This would result in the crankshaft bending too much between the main bearings.

2) Increase the piston stroke - this would lead to an over long cylinder liner with associated casting problems, the tripartite liner as an attempt to overcome this was never really successful

3) Increase the mean effective pressure in the cylinder - this would increase the bending moment on the crankshaft - see 1 above

4) Increase the number of cylinders - this would lengthen an already long engine increasing the size of the machinery space and eating into cargo space.

Mind you, material science and technology has come on a great deal in the 30 years since the demise of the Doxford, maybe these problems could now be overcome.

One other problem was the additional survey requirements of the bearings for the side rods, 2 bottom ends and crossheads.
 

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I was always told that Doxford's demise was down to them having licensee builders. Obvious from this not completely true. Can anyone expand on this? David V
Hi David, if you go to doxford-engine.com you will find a fairly comprehensive history of the Doxford engine
Hamish
 

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Yes they did. I sailed on her. Sydney/Brisbane/Port Moresby/Madang/Lae/Wewak then back to Sydney to start all over again. Great times on a good run. She was a Doxford and built if memory serves me correctly in HK. I think she was originally the Kwangsi but may be wrong


Yes it was the KWANGSI

Alfons
 
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