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There is a 3 cyl Doxford engine at Beamish Museam Stanley Co Durham worth a look
My understanding was it was non operational? and/or only by invitation?. Can anyone confirm?. The one Ex South Shields Collage. is in a dismantled state at the Anson Engine Muesem.

We used to take liner readings standing on the lower piston with the turning gear remote in hand. And on one ocasion, my Wife sat on the tops writing down the readings!.

Pete
 

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There is a 3 cyl Doxford engine at Beamish Museam Stanley Co Durham worth a look
It's the same type as the one I referred to in #99 above. Five were fitted to Ellerman ships and two to Prince Line ships. I think the one at Beamish is engine No.471 which was built in1979 as an experimental engine and was used intermitantly as such until 1983 before being sold to Beamish in 1986
 

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It's the same type as the one I referred to in #99 above. Five were fitted to Ellerman ships and two to Prince Line ships. I think the one at Beamish is engine No.471 which was built in1979 as an experimental engine and was used intermitantly as such until 1983 before being sold to Beamish in 1986
The three cylinder Doxford as mentioned originally dates back to the second world war and before. The engine room was also equipped with a scotch boiler for deck gear and stand by engine pumps and generator. When at sea the engine services Lube oil sea water circulation and fresh water circulation were provided by engine mounted pumps driven off the same levers that drove the scavenge pumps from No 2 crosshead through swinging links. When manoevering the steam pumps would take over. The engine room was very quiet at sea as there was just a small diesel generator or lighting.
In port the 3 Furnace boiler was used for deck winches and auxiliaries and at sea an exhaust fired boiler provided steam for the steering gear and accommodation heating etc.

Many of the ships fitted with these were around 10,000 tons and built during the war. Some went on working till the 70's

I was amused on one voyage when the generator failed the 3rd engineer immediately rushed to stop the engine. I stopped him and asked WHY ? It took him a while to realise that unlike the more modern engines he had sailed with this one did not need electric power. Even the engine alarms would still work as they had air powered whistles.

They were economical to buy and operate and would get the 10,000 tons around the world using 7 tons of fuel per day at 7 knots. Yes a bit slow and in a storm they would make no headway and sometimes go backwards.

Happy Days. and very happy ships. I enjoyed about 12 months on Great City ex Empire Tavoy.
 

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I sailed on similar vessels, 4Cyl Doxfords, Steam auxiliaries, 2 Steam 220V DC generators. Steam Compressors, 2 "Scotch" boilers, one with exhaust gas "firing" under way. All the pumps where taken off the Scavenge Pump rig. At sea they where (almost) as quiet as the old 3 and 4 leg steam recips. Simple, Engineering.


Pete
 

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Did the last two trips of the Baltistan , Strick line, as above , middle,of the English Channel the exhaust gas boiler set the boiler room bilge on fire , the C/E. Ivison managed to jam a large fire extinguisher in the entrance to the boiler room . The problem was he was in the boiler room and everyone else was outside , bilges pumped very quickly.
 

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Did the last two trips of the Baltistan , Strick line, as above , middle,of the English Channel the exhaust gas boiler set the boiler room bilge on fire , the C/E. Ivison managed to jam a large fire extinguisher in the entrance to the boiler room . The problem was he was in the boiler room and everyone else was outside , bilges pumped very quickly.
I take it the exhaust gas boiler was somewhere in the funnel area( uptakes). Why would it need a bilge unless you mean a 'save all' around the boiler base, the exhaust boiler being composite oil/ exhaust gas.
With BSL all our boilers were at ER changing room level or above in the funnel. There would be drains for when blowing gauge glasses and save all if oil fueled with a drip tray filled with sand under the burner and the sand box with an assortment of the donkeymans graphic reading matter on the top.

A 1952 Twin LBD had a black start steam air compressor, so you light the boiler on which they ran on HFO, so a slight problem there, unless you used dunnage to raise steam, steam feed pumps ( Worthingtons I think) , with enough steam fire up the steam compressor then start a genny. Electric fuel heater and fan & oil pump.
 

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I take it the exhaust gas boiler was somewhere in the funnel area( uptakes). Why would it need a bilge unless you mean a 'save all' around the boiler base, the exhaust boiler being composite oil/ exhaust gas.
With BSL all our boilers were at ER changing room level or above in the funnel. There would be drains for when blowing gauge glasses and save all if oil fueled with a drip tray filled with sand under the burner and the sand box with an assortment of the donkeymans graphic reading matter on the top.
No. Baltistan, like her sisters, was equiped with 2 Scotch type Boilers, (P&S) on the Tank top level each with it`s own Boiler room. When One (Port?) was transfered to exhaust gas the boiler room became uncomfortably Hot!. If there was OIL in the Bilge it was not impossible for a conflagration to ensue. Keeping the boiler room tank tops clear of oil and oily water was extremely important and difficult to achieve at times. I sailed on Baltistan, and with C/E Ivison (Bimbo behind his back) on Karaghistan on a later occasion when he regaled us of the "event".

Pete
 
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