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And people worried about the sun giving us skin cancer! I've just had a small bit of low grade cancer removed from an area that has seen more oil and sludge than sunlight !
I wonder how well we were protected back then
No skincare precautions but "Jonnies" like wellington boots!!!
How many out there are now suffering hearing loss (due to years spent with twin Doxfords blaring in your ears)
ear defenders were either not supplied or not used
I now have a fast pass to my local Skin clinic
 

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Yep!. As soon as we got south of Biscay. We got turned out on deck, servicing and checking the winches and windlass`, and later deck cranes, for the abuse the Arab wharfie`s where going to give them in the Gulf. Pair of shorts and (sometimes) an old cap with a rag to keep the sun off the neck. No wonder with hindsight, I keep having to have "things" removed from my skin!. The joke in our house, is my hearing range is only deficiant on the frequencies of womens voices!.:)

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #43
I wonder how well we were protected back then
No skincare precautions but "Jonnies" like wellington boots!!!
How many out there are now suffering hearing loss (due to years spent with twin Doxfords blaring in your ears)
ear defenders were either not supplied or not used
I now have a fast pass to my local Skin clinic
In the scheme of things I think the naruraly aspirated Doxfords were quite quiet - until a relief valve lifted :(
I think it was the turbchargers and the turbo-alternator sets and 65 bar steam leaks that did for me.
 

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I had thought that the majority of my sea time was spent with LB Doxfords but looking back into my discharge book I realise that was not the case – it just seemed that way ‘cos lots of “stuff” happen during those times!
The Doxford engine, with its uniflow scavenging and constant pressure fuel injection, certainly had the best fuel consumption of its time and, with no combustion loads transmitted to the structure, were relatively vibration free but …… it was so mechanically complicated!
Main bearings was in a spherical pocket, and each unit had two pistons and so many bearings; three bottom end bearings in spherical housings, three crosshead bearings and slippers, two side rod bearings and a big centre bearing in the transverse beam.
Despite this, the engines up to 670mm bore seemed to run quite well but, of course, the number of components resulted in a large maintenance load compared with single piston engines even when they were running well.
For my sins most of my time was spent with 75LB6 engines and because I didn’t know much different I didn’t realise at the time how bad they were. I think there were only 12 of this size built and our company had six of them and I sailed on 4 of those.
Before they were 4 years old, all our engines had to have new crankshafts due to a design defect. However, they still had a weakness in that No 3 forward and No 4 aft crankwebs were highly stressed at the internal fillet with the adjacent main journal. This wasn’t helped by the fact that the ships themselves were very flexible and resulted in having to be careful with crankshaft alignment and I became quite proficient at threading a piano wire through the engine and the aft engine room bulkhead to the aft peak bulkhead. However that didn’t stop us finding a large fracture in No.4 on one ship and having carried out a sort of repair sailed back to the UK to discover another fracture at No3 as the engine was being dismantled to receive it’s third crankshaft in 12 years.
All these engines kept the likes of Andrews Master Hones and Golten Marine in business machining our journals and pins in situ as we had numerous bearing failures. For reasons I can’t remember we has several failures of bottom end bearings resulting from the white metal breaking up like crazy paving. Other failures probably resulted from locked sphericals and dirt and water contaminated lube oil.
Being non-diaphragm engines it was a battle to keep the oil clean, not helped by high piston ring and liner wear rates, so we fitted larger bottom piston scraper drains and run purifiers continuously and injected trisodiumphosphate to decrease the acidity .
Water contamination was a problem because the bottom piston cooling water system, in addition to the usual gland problems, also suffered for severe erosion and despite setting off with lots of elbows and pipes, there never seem to be enough.
As a consequence of dirty, wet oil we ended up with a very severe microbial attack on one ship and a lesser attack on another that resulted in more profits for the in situ machiners and the airlines flying crosshead pins back to the UK for microfinishing.
This size engine also seemed to suffer for disproportionally high were rates with the transverse pin bearings compare with the smaller bore engines. I wonder if this had anything to do with the exceptional flexibility of the crankshaft? We had a good example of this with the engine with the fractured crasnkshaft; a large steel strap has been fitted around the crankweb and we had to cut a bit of the bedplate away to allow it to rotate. However when we started the engine we found the strap was fouling the bedplate despite there being ample clearance in the static condition!
There were many more issues but I don’t remember feeling bad about them – in my ignorance I just thought that was the way of things when you went to sea as an engineer in the '60s. But then I did my “steam time”………….. and my eyes were opened!
 

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I have uploaded a video taken (cine film) in 1958 of the mv Tyrone to my YouTube channel (Capspread) - it is Part One of a two part video. I'm hoping that Part Two will be uploaded next weekend. But I am looking for a sound effect of a Doxford Engine. Any idea where I could find it?
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I have uploaded a video taken (cine film) in 1958 of the mv Tyrone to my YouTube channel (Capspread) - it is Part One of a two part video. I'm hoping that Part Two will be uploaded next weekend. But I am looking for a sound effect of a Doxford Engine. Any idea where I could find it?
I have uploaded a video taken (cine film) in 1958 of the mv Tyrone to my YouTube channel (Capspread) - it is Part One of a two part video. I'm hoping that Part Two will be uploaded next weekend. But I am looking for a sound effect of a Doxford Engine. Any idea where I could find it?
Lots on YouTube
 

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Interesting stuff, takes me back to my Elder Dempster days over fifty years ago, nearly all Doxfords with the odd one or two B&W's. I have just been looking at the old Port Sydney on YouTube but I cannot remember what the small wheel was for on the left of the controls!! Time to book into the Old Peoples Home I think!!
Can anyone refresh an old brain??
Cheers
Cliff
that small wheel adjusts the fuel pressure in the common rail system.
Hugh Martin
 

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Discussion Starter #49
that small wheel adjusts the fuel pressure in the common rail system.
Hugh Martin
If you had a NEM Doxford it might have had the pressure control handwheel replaced by a lever and if you were lucky enough to have a pre-timing valve engine with NEMSTOP you could have had yet another lever making five - idea for octopuses 😕
 

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If you had a NEM Doxford it might have had the pressure control handwheel replaced by a lever and if you were lucky enough to have a pre-timing valve engine with NEMSTOP you could have had yet another lever making five - idea for octopuses 😕
 
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