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I could not imagine the Kiwi Coast without a bar, especially when the bars onshore closed so early in the evenings!

Can anyone remember the British Bar in Lyttleton or Chicks bar in Port Chalmers?
Bistro bar in Wellington . close 6pm , que for taxi with cases of beer , party at some birds house , or back to ship to partyHit every wall in British bar .
 

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UK officers union newspaper today says "50 years ago" Texaco Overseas and Benline were opening talks about having bars onboard their vessels, along with Haines Nourse! Pleased I joined a bit later when all ships I sailed on until last 20 years had bar!!
Dannic
 

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UK officers union newspaper today says "50 years ago" Texaco Overseas and Benline were opening talks about having bars onboard their vessels, along with Haines Nourse! Pleased I joined a bit later when all ships I sailed on until last 20 years had bar!!
Dannic
There was a theory at the time that having a bar would bring drinking out into the open and out of wardrobes, etc. People had been making their own bars in the smokeroom for quite a while before it became official.

All a thing of the past now, I believe. Is it true you have to be a Vegan to go to sea nowadays?

John T
 

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Canberra Star 1971, had just been kitted out with a bar, in the smoke room, by Watneys with bar, optics, cooler and pumps.
 

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Canberra Star 1971, had just been kitted out with a bar, in the smoke room, by Watneys with bar, optics, cooler and pumps.
It had to be a southern ship with Watneys my god such a load of crap was it their red barrel ugh,another horror was hop leaf I think I had it on C.P.R.by far the best in crew bars on the Cunard was Wrexham Lager which I believe is the oldest brewed in the UK if I am wrong no doubt one of our experts among us old timers will let me know,I may have posted before but on the Reina Del Mar leaving Colon us after gang all with raging hangovers letting go were treated by a saint she was the mother of a lass I was having a liasion with as was another A.B.with her mother who on seeing our plight came up with a tray of Barcleys beer ice cold I can still see them with the condensation running down the sides of the bottles I will remember for the test of my days I wonder if any of us still alive remember her with the reverence I do.Whilst we are on the subject of booze on ships who was the best home brewer of hooch you sailed with,on the Hyria we had an A.B.from the Isle of Man who was the most accomplished I ever knew and his brews were very palatable the cook kept him supplied with all the ingredients he needed how the old man on his rounds didn't smell the stuff,so come on let's know who you remember.
Stay Safe and remember those less fortunate than us.Tom Roberts.u
 

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In the early 1960s with Shell we varied between Amstel, Heineken and Tuborg.
With Ellermans, mainly there was Alsopp's Double Diamond or Tennent's Thistle lager but on a couple of voyages we had Charrington's Toby Ale - truly dreadful - and aneer from Hull Brewery which was almost as bad. Lacking any air-con, in the case of those latter two beers it was probably all to the good that most of the contents of the can or bottle gushed out on opening and were lost.
 

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#65 Red Barrel it was. It didn’t travel well. Bar committee, excluding OM, C/E and C/Stwd, decided to ‘free’ issue lime juice splash, to get rid of the beer, so we could have the kegs refilled on Aussie coast.
Not sure, but think Swan Lager, did the filling. Fosters, 4X and others wouldn’t consider the idea. Anyway, whoever it was, we got extra fittings for the bar, plus a few “free” cases of lager
 

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In the early 1960s with Shell we varied between Amstel, Heineken and Tuborg.
With Ellermans, mainly there was Alsopp's Double Diamond or Tennent's Thistle lager but on a couple of voyages we had Charrington's Toby Ale - truly dreadful - and aneer from Hull Brewery which was almost as bad. Lacking any air-con, in the case of those latter two beers it was probably all to the good that most of the contents of the can or bottle gushed out on opening and were lost.
Ron you are correct about that Hull beer it was truly awful but you have to remember that Sir John I believe owned the Brewery.
 

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Naess Pioneer, 1970. Myself and John Cook, both first trippers. The Mate put us up to work 'fixing' the bar. The ship had two dining rooms, the upper was never used. The lower was used for dining.

The unused space was gutted... the four large table went overboard. A table tennis table was provided. Painted out etc. The small 'captain's lounge' was repainted, added the fridge, optics etc, nice easy chairs. A good space. The deck outside... chipped, painted, added deck chairs. Needed an awning. By the end of that I was master at sewing canvas! Final touch, the name of the bar... The Navel Club. My 'art' on the glass door panel.

New master joined, Captain A. Smart. First lunch at sea, drinks in the bar. The OM went to the Mate, "Those two first trippers were drinking in the bar!" The Mate says, "They are the two that built it." The OM say, "Yes, but they are first trippers, they are both underage and they were drinking PINK GINS!!!!!" The smokes and the 'Old Port' mini cigars didn't help!
 

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"...you have to remember that Sir John I believe owned the Brewery"

We were also told that he had money in Charrington's. That trip Toby Ale was particularly unwelcome because we went down to South Africa (too short a trip to justify restocking), Cape Town, PE, Durban with the bond sealed but no problem, plenty of Lion and Castle ashore. Then LM and Beira where we anchored off for yonks with only Toby Ale. From there in ballast to the East coast ports of India (not Calcutta) and up to swing at the pick for best part of a month in Chalna. Still with bloody Toby.
 

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Hadn't spotted this thread before! I must have been away working when this thread was running? Following all the posts I'm surprised that no one has mentioned that in 1990, Drug & Alcohol Guidelines were introduced across the global tanker sector. These not only limited alcohol consumption onboard, laid down strict limitations on the maximum blood/alcohol level permitted (0.40) and introduced unannounced testing of seafarers for both alcolhol and drugs. Over the intervening 30 years this has become the accepted norm and most tankers are dry ships! Perhaps of interest that these day it is rare to hear of drink or drugs being a problem that arises on tankers. My experience over the past 18 years on a wide variety of vessels in all sectors, other than passenger/cruise, is that in most other sectors the policy is for dry ships and this is accepted. I have only come across one vessel during this time with an operating bar and this was an ex P&O capesize bulker!
Cheers. Chris
 

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Quote:
#67 .
"Is it true you have to be a Vegan to go to sea nowadays?

John T

Yes. And it helps if you are a lesbian."

Blimey, everyone will be ordering coir mats for lunch!

John T
 
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