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My daughter made a dry curry yesterday and brought some for me.

I told her about the various curry's we had in Brock's one of which being China Chillau, (pronounced 'Chillow), which was a dry curry. Whether this was a 'common' curry throughout Brock's or just on the one ship ('Maipura') I know not.

Any ideas chaps?(Scribe) Phil
 

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My daughter made a dry curry yesterday and brought some for me.

I told her about the various curry's we had in Brock's one of which being China Chillau, (pronounced 'Chillow), which was a dry curry. Whether this was a 'common' curry throughout Brock's or just on the one ship ('Maipura') I know not.

Any ideas chaps?(Scribe) Phil
I had China Chillau on several Brock ships. I enjoyed it until one day I located a well-cooked half cockroach hiding in the mince. The other half could not be found.
Curried tinned sardines went down well, as did guinea fowl and a huge Hooghli fish (bechti) - best of all was curried Aberdeen salmon that had got too high to poach. Oh! but best of all were the Sunderbunds prawns . . .
 

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A Texaco regular was Dry Mince and Dhall Curry. Maybe Regular is not the best word to use.
That was a very welcome regular when I was on the Regent (later Texaco) Pembroke in 1964/65. Also a frequent presence on the menu when I was on Ellerman's City of Lucknow, in 1962/64 so it was perhaps a dish on the "Indian Crew for European Ships" cooks' training programme. I was grateful for it on any ship and, as it was always warmly greeted, others shared that view.
 

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All the curries were great on all Brock Vessels ; staple meal at lunchtime although there were many alternatives for those who wanted a change. Derek
 

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China Chiloe was a regular dish on all the Brock ships I was on with their Bengali cooks. One Bombay/Goanese cook on the tankers (Moss Tankers) wanted to draw chickens for the China Chiloe. Most of the other curries seemed to be the same or similar with the different catering crews.
 

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On Mawana 68/69 a regular dry curry was offered as Jal Freezi with parathas. It was the best one I've had and have never been able to find it since.
 

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I add a very sketchy recipe, copied from a letter from Dad to Mum in May 1945. Dad was MO with the army in Burma.

"Yesterday we made some chapatties from a tin of Bengers, a tin of cheese, some water, baking powder and salt. It was a noble effort and the results were very fine. We cooked them by dropping them dry on a heated dustpan sort of thing we found in a bin of rice."

Not a conventional recipe, but the spice of appetite does wonders.

"Bengers was first produced in the later part of the 19th Century (Circa 1880/90) in the Strangeways area of Manchester, England. Bengers is a powder supplement drink containing amylase and trypsin, two of the enzymes that the body uses to break down and digest food. Bengers was added to hot milk, the trypsin would then begin to break down the rich milk proteins (often difficult to digest), whilst the amylase would react with the wheaten base, making extra energy instantly available. Bengers was ideal for patients in convalescence or those suffering stress, nervous tension, stomach upsets and sleepnesses as they would benefit from the gentle nourishment of predigested Bengers, even when they fell ‘off’ other food. The original Bengers company was taken over in the 1950s by Fisons Pharmaceuticals."
 

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On Mawana 68/69 a regular dry curry was offered as Jal Freezi with parathas. It was the best one I've had and have never been able to find it since.
I didn't come across Jalfrezi and Parathas on my first few trips but it was a regular after that. A dry curry that came ready wrapped in the parathas like fajitas. The Goanese chief cook on Lucerna would draw a tin of marmalade as one of the ingredients
 

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China Chilo also reached the South American Saint Line in the 1950's, presumably because we had Chinese cooks.
 

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Totally agree and there I was thinking it was peculiar to BP tankers. There is a recipe, of sorts, somewhere on this site which I regularly cook but have to admit it is not quite correct.
Only we had to use yellow split peas in the absence of Dhall peas.
Basically curried peas pudding and a dry fried spicy mince.
I make it at home now, but use lamb mince not beef.
 

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Only we had to use yellow split peas in the absence of Dhall peas.
Basically curried peas pudding and a dry fried spicy mince.
I make it at home now, but use lamb mince not beef.
Are you prepared to share your recipe for the dry mince as that is the bit I have trouble with.
 
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