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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
I am working on a history of the Henry Robb Shipyards in Leith, Scotland where i served my time as a Loftsman, very interested in any stories, photograghs etc of the many Ships built by Henry Robb for the Line, i am collating a fair bit of info on a blog, but hope to get a good website up and running soon to show a history of the ships build, record the workers of the yard and of course of the many men and women who may have sailed on Robb's built ships, you can find the blog at http://leithbuiltships.blogspot.com
and the ships of interest are among the following, Tinto, Truro, Bravo, Silvio, Darinian, Palmelian, built in the late 1940's after the war, and the following vessels, Cavello, Trentino, Cicero, Rollo, Teano, Flaminian, Malatian, Catanian, AARO, Rapallo, Arcadian, from the 1950's and the following from the 1960's, Salerno, Salmo, Sorrento, Silvio, Sangro, Athenian and last but not least, Mediterranian.
I thank you for your time and interest,

The Loftsman,
"Fairline" A line that is pleasing to the eye.
 

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Never met a Loftsman, I suppose that it's the most important position in the shipbuilding process. Fortunately I never had to call on one during my ship repairing career. Although I was in charge of fitting hundreds of tons of steel now and then.
 

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just type the name of the ship you are looking for on this site and if it is there it will come up i have done it and got all the ships you are looking fore, i to am from the shipbuilding and ship repair yards in Hull and i am writing a book about it , worked on all the ships you have said in the dry docks in Hull sam2182sw
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Leith Built Ships

Never met a Loftsman, I suppose that it's the most important position in the shipbuilding process. Fortunately I never had to call on one during my ship repairing career. Although I was in charge of fitting hundreds of tons of steel now and then.
Hi Billyboy,
Well you have now, so hello, we also did a lot of ship repair work, and many conversions, during the rush for the black stuff in the North Sea, my view is that it takes every kind of worker to produce a ship.
Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Shipbuilding.

just type the name of the ship you are looking for on this site and if it is there it will come up i have done it and got all the ships you are looking fore, i to am from the shipbuilding and ship repair yards in Hull and i am writing a book about it , worked on all the ships you have said in the dry docks in Hull sam2182sw
Hi Sam2182,
Thanks for the advice, will try some searching on this site, good luck with the book, and i may well go down the same road, as i have a lot of info all over the place on Henry Robb Shipyards up to now.
 

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Hi Loftsman. I sailed on the City of Valleta in 1979 and I am pretty sure that she was built in Leith. Maybe somebody could confirm that this was the renamed Athenian.
 

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Ellerman Boats

Hello all,
I am working on a history of the Henry Robb Shipyards in Leith, Scotland where i served my time as a Loftsman, very interested in any stories, photograghs etc of the many Ships built by Henry Robb for the Line, i am collating a fair bit of info on a blog, but hope to get a good website up and running soon to show a history of the ships build, record the workers of the yard and of course of the many men and women who may have sailed on Robb's built ships, you can find the blog at http://leithbuiltships.blogspot.com
and the ships of interest are among the following, Tinto, Truro, Bravo, Silvio, Darinian, Palmelian, built in the late 1940's after the war, and the following vessels, Cavello, Trentino, Cicero, Rollo, Teano, Flaminian, Malatian, Catanian, AARO, Rapallo, Arcadian, from the 1950's and the following from the 1960's, Salerno, Salmo, Sorrento, Silvio, Sangro, Athenian and last but not least, Mediterranian.
I thank you for your time and interest,

The Loftsman,
"Fairline" A line that is pleasing to the eye.
Hi Loftsman,
I worked on the Cavallo and Trentino as a Joiner in the Fifties. I particularly remember doing the Bell mouthed staircases from the lounge deck. They were in Oak and Teak, and because of the wide bell mouth and the sharp turn to the twin flights of stairs at the top, the handrailing was particularly tricky. The handrail wreaths were too tight to be moulded on the machine spindle moulder, so we had to bandsaw then, and then spokeshave and finally shaped scraper the wreaths to make them "Sweet." Drawings for these Bell mouthed staircases are still extant, the chap who runs the Henry Robb ships site has them,
Regards,
Terry McGuire
 

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Hi Loftsman, I had a brief spell as Radio Officer on the Rollo sailing between Hull and Gothenburg. Would have been early 60's.
Good luck
 

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Sailed in Rollo in 1966 sailed from Hull a week before the NUS strike,and got back 2 weeks after it was finished, it was the longest trip the Rollo had done for many years. As soon as she came home to Hull she went back on her regular 10 day run.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
To all ex-Ellerman

Hi all,
Just managed to get back onto the site after having p.c. problems then losing my password, well thanks for the info so far, i am now getting close to the release of my website which is a bit more involved than the blog with a lot more info and of course takes a lot more time, there will be space on the website for any ex ships sailors to put their own stories of the time on the different ships etc, so as soon as it is up and live i shall let everyone know.
cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Cavello and Trentino

Hi Loftsman,
I worked on the Cavallo and Trentino as a Joiner in the Fifties. I particularly remember doing the Bell mouthed staircases from the lounge deck. They were in Oak and Teak, and because of the wide bell mouth and the sharp turn to the twin flights of stairs at the top, the handrailing was particularly tricky. The handrail wreaths were too tight to be moulded on the machine spindle moulder, so we had to bandsaw then, and then spokeshave and finally shaped scraper the wreaths to make them "Sweet." Drawings for these Bell mouthed staircases are still extant, the chap who runs the Henry Robb ships site has them,
Regards,
Terry McGuire
Hi Terry,
Will be in touch,

cheers
 
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