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It depends on what you expect and have signed up for? Check your agreements carefully.
Overall in the 50/60 one signed up with a shipping company for 4 years six months, One under took the following:-
To attend a technical college for then an HNC, or OND Or a ONC study course, The process was based upon studies for the part A Certificate of competancy in the lower qualifications-if obtained. Then the ONC HND, if passed would gain an exemption from the Part B of the certificate of competancy, except engineering Knowledge and the orals.
If One did not attend college as expected or failed completely the ONC, OND Or HND qualifications, while one was doing the sea time 18 moths and final college time. The company had the option to terminate the agreement, and one had to rely on a engineering 5 year craft apprenticeship, and join the company (provided one had the practical skills and necessary back up indentures) one may be offered a seagoing position as a junior engineer, or the agreement could be terminated by the company. The company throughout for academic and educational reasons had the right to terminate the employment agreement. AS One had the choice at the end of the indentured apprenticeship the 'right' to terminate any employment agreement. How ever be aware the British Marine Industry in my time was run and legislated by the SHipping Federation, and if one chose to terminate an agreement with one particular company for which they had signed an 'Indenture' and failed to reach any level of academic or practical skill, ONE MAY NOT BE CONSIDERED as SUITABLE FOR a POSITION OF A JUNIOR OFFICER. (DEEP international SEA TRADE vessel.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks "Captain" perhaps I was not specific, when I served my cadetship, there were 2 streams, OND and METC, the common denominator was the cadetship lasted 4 years, for mates you would be promoted to 3rd mate and Junior Engineer. I had my part A exemption for 2nd and Chiefs, whereas I think? the METC route did not give the exemption. What's the route now?...........................
 

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What is METC? When I started, it was the first year of the Technician Education Council Diploma. I then did the TEC Higher Diploma - Really OND and HND! The main objective of TEC was to recognize previous experience and to provide "Level" building blocks. Apparently, some are recognized as Level 9 - above degree courses.

I only realized this when a.) I applied for unemployment benefits, and, b.) I coursed training as an Assesor.

The Eng. Cadetship study period was always 3 years - 2 for Phase I and 1 for Phase III, Phase II being sea time. Some companies, like T&J did a bit here and there, so, Phase III´s were back with us in Phase III even though they were a year ahead of us - Plus the Thickies that had failed!

Rgds.
Dave
 

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What is METC? When I started, it was the first year of the Technician Education Council Diploma. I then did the TEC Higher Diploma - Really OND and HND! The main objective of TEC was to recognize previous experience and to provide "Level" building blocks. Apparently, some are recognized as Level 9 - above degree courses.

I only realized this when a.) I applied for unemployment benefits, and, b.) I coursed training as an Assesor.

The Eng. Cadetship study period was always 3 years - 2 for Phase I and 1 for Phase III, Phase II being sea time. Some companies, like T&J did a bit here and there, so, Phase III´s were back with us in Phase III even though they were a year ahead of us - Plus the Thickies that had failed!

Rgds.
Dave
Marine Engineers Technicians Certificate issued by City and Guilds
During phase 3 of the cadetship you sat the Marine Engineers Technicians Advanced Certificate which if passed you give you an exemption from 2nd's part A but not the chiefs
 

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I served a four year mechanical fitter apprenticeship ashore before going to sea as a junior, (1974), we did similar courses on day release most of the guys did City and Guilds but as I had a few O levels it allowed me to do an ONC which exempted me from Part A Seconds except the drawing exam , as I spent the last six months of my apprenticeship in the drawing office the drawing so the was fairly easy from what I remember there was a catch in the drawing it was of a high lift safety valve but it would not work as one of the dimensions was wrong. It was wrong on purpose to catch you out and you had to make a note off this in the final drawing. That was the only exemption I had and had to do all the rest 2nds and Chiefs. I should have left my apprenticesgip with an HNC but I discovered girls and pubs at that time so had to do the hard work later. :)
 

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Nowt wrong with girls and pubs,glad I experienced it and sometimes wish I could pop into a time m/c and redo the college time , leave shenanigans and excellent runs ashore/ ships parties which made the tougher times at sea well worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I served a four year mechanical fitter apprenticeship ashore before going to sea as a junior, (1974), we did similar courses on day release most of the guys did City and Guilds but as I had a few O levels it allowed me to do an ONC which exempted me from Part A Seconds except the drawing exam , as I spent the last six months of my apprenticeship in the drawing office the drawing so the was fairly easy from what I remember there was a catch in the drawing it was of a high lift safety valve but it would not work as one of the dimensions was wrong. It was wrong on purpose to catch you out and you had to make a note off this in the final drawing. That was the only exemption I had and had to do all the rest 2nds and Chiefs. I should have left my apprenticesgip with an HNC but I discovered girls and pubs at that time so had to do the hard work later. :)
Well done you
 

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Interesting. I did my Cadetship in Australia. 3 yrs in College with trips on the coast during the holidays. Then last year deep sea for the whole year. You came out with PartA and B of Chiefs and 2nds as well as everything in Part B except EK. Then you needed 15 months sea time before doing 2nds EK. If you passed, then 15mths before doing Chiefs. I joined Bank Line straight after the Cadetship and literally sailed through the sea time plus had loads of fun.
 

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Wow, all that technical and schooling stuff, glad it wasn't around in my day. I served a 5 year apprenticeship as a fitter in the Windlass Bay at Clarke Chapmans in Gateshead.
Nearing 21, I wrote to Royal Mail Lines asking for a job as junior engineer. They sent me a travel voucher for the train and asked me to come to London for an interview and off I went. While there for the interview they asked me to take a fitness exam the same day, which I did.
On returning to the head office after the physical I was greeted with a "welcome aboard", I had a job. A few days later I received a letter telling me to go to Liverpool and join the RMS Balantia (former Sam boat) as 5th engineer officer. I had to get all my clobber in Liverpool before sailing on Christmas eve December 1953.
Incidentally, it seemed like a number of engineers I met were in the Merchant Navy dodging the Army in those days.
 

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#12 I served my fitting apprenticeship with the MOD 69/74 and some of the fitters I worked with had been at sea during national service and they went to sea (MN) I think for five years instead of doing three years national service. They were they guys who talked me into going to sea with all the exotic tales. There were stories of romantic attachments on ships taking immigrants to Australia, of the excitement of Grant Road in Bombay and Clifford Pier and Bugis Street in Singapore. Then there was Brazil where the girls were every colour from blonde Arian goddesses to black Afro queens. It did not take me long after this great evaluation of Merchant Navy life to be scrabbling through the phone book to find the phone number of J&J Denholm and get away to these exotic places. However where did I end up, on my first trip, Marsa El Brega in Libya and Ras Tanura in Saudi with not a woman or more to the point a beer in sight. Still I sayed in the MN for 15 years then 28 on drilling rigs and worked all over the World visiting over 60 different countries. This would have not happened if it had not been for the stories from the guys who had dodged the National Service.
 

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#12 I served my fitting apprenticeship with the MOD 69/74 and some of the fitters I worked with had been at sea during national service and they went to sea (MN) I think for five years instead of doing three years national service. They were they guys who talked me into going to sea with all the exotic tales. There were stories of romantic attachments on ships taking immigrants to Australia, of the excitement of Grant Road in Bombay and Clifford Pier and Bugis Street in Singapore. Then there was Brazil where the girls were every colour from blonde Arian goddesses to black Afro queens. It did not take me long after this great evaluation of Merchant Navy life to be scrabbling through the phone book to find the phone number of J&J Denholm and get away to these exotic places. However where did I end up, on my first trip, Marsa El Brega in Libya and Ras Tanura in Saudi with not a woman or more to the point a beer in sight. Still I sayed in the MN for 15 years then 28 on drilling rigs and worked all over the World visiting over 60 different countries. This would have not happened if it had not been for the stories from the guys who had dodged the National Service.

Ah, you should have gone away with Bank Line.....all that and more:p:p
 
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