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Discussion Starter #1
Wondering the ethnic backgrounds of merchant radio officers From 1940 - 1970 (i.e., Irish, Scottish, English, Welch, American and etc.)?
Also wondering which group had the largest percentage?
 

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On the ships I crossed paths with, they were usually of the same origin as the other officers, but I noticed a fair amount of British R/Os on Greek-owned ships, Indians (usually Sikh) on HK and Greek-owned ships, Scandinavians on the ships of neighboring nations. Once met a female R/O from the Philippines on a ship from Taiwan.
 

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I was English when I started but after 20 years I was a bit of everything !
Wi Eye hinny & KLN to yo all
 

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Niarchos was a big UK and Rep of Ireland RO employer.
P D Marchessini ships were all Greek flag whence it was mandatory to employ Greek ROs.
PD would have nothing to do with them (another story) and on one ship Euryalus the RO was apparently a physically handicapped American who through this disability was unable to find US flag employ.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"****" was a slang (sometimes derogatory) term for an Irishman.
 

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Thanks Dr Jim.
I've been around for a good many years, but have never heard that applied to an Irishman. Paddy, yes, but never ****!

Just as an aside. I was on a ship and the 3E(Scottish) called me Paddy. I asked him why. Because you're Irish and you're a sparky.
I said I was from the Outer Hebrides.
Reply, that's what I said, you're Irish.

As he was Scottish, I didn't try to explain.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As I was told by my grandfather it originated in Ellis Island when Irish immigrated to the US. The border control officers would look at the name on the papers (usually Mc Nally, or Mc Kennedy) see the Mc and say out loud "we got another **** here."
 

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Thanks Dr Jim.
I've been around for a good many years, but have never heard that applied to an Irishman. Paddy, yes, but never ****!

Just as an aside. I was on a ship and the 3E(Scottish) called me Paddy. I asked him why. Because you're Irish and you're a sparky.
I said I was from the Outer Hebrides.
Reply, that's what I said, you're Irish.

As he was Scottish, I didn't try to explain.
It seems to be fairly common usage if it is somewhat non PC.
 

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Thanks Dr Jim.
I've been around for a good many years, but have never heard that applied to an Irishman. Paddy, yes, but never ****!

Just as an aside. I was on a ship and the 3E(Scottish) called me Paddy. I asked him why. Because you're Irish and you're a sparky.
I said I was from the Outer Hebrides.
Reply, that's what I said, you're Irish.

As he was Scottish, I didn't try to explain.
Could he have been an East Coast Chinaman?
 

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It seems to be fairly common usage if it is somewhat non PC.
Totally non PC but as I is one I feel free to bandy the term about with gay abandon.

Paddy and **** are interchangeable as dozens of Irish Jokes refer to.
The Irish Guards are fondly known as the ***** as is the Scots Guards known as the Jocks.

But back to reality, in 10 years sailing with Marconi Men 80 to 90% of them were from southern Ireland and strangely none were from Scotland.
 

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My first boss was a Southern Irishman with the name of Sullivan.He lived in Southport. He was a kindly but firm, old gentleman, who didn't have a long retirement. I also had one in the RFA he was from Cork,I was bit older than him, due to my late return to sea. He went home on leave and didn't come back, we thought he had a nervous breakdown. I also sailed with a welshman,who I still get a Christmas card from,but as you say, I cant recall any scotsmen.
 

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Before I went to sea, I worked on a building site in Glasgow(I was 16 at the time).
Working beside me was, to me elderly, an Irish guy.
He asked me where I was from. I said the West coast. Yes he said, I thought from your accent, you were from Donegal.
That explains it all.

No wonder an East coast Chinaman could mistake me for being Irish!
 

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Plenty of Scots and Irish at GKA. In fact at one time the overseer's "Wendy House" was known as "Ireland" due to the number of Irish managers. Quite a few Welsh amongst the staff too.

Other nationalities at the station included Canadian, Cypriot, a couple from Jersey and a couple from Mauritius. Think there were some 'dual nationality' staff too.

If the mood takes me I might go through our staff lists to find exact numbers.
 

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My first boss in RFA in 1963 was a most likeable Southern Irishman. Poor fellow did not get much of a retirement. He didn’t even manage to make it home when he paid off his final ship. RIP Noel.
 

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As I was told by my grandfather it originated in Ellis Island when Irish immigrated to the US. The border control officers would look at the name on the papers (usually Mc Nally, or Mc Kennedy) see the Mc and say out loud "we got another **** here."
Yep, "*****" would tend to be more closely associated with the US.

Brian
 

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My first boss was a Southern Irishman with the name of Sullivan.He lived in Southport. He was a kindly but firm, old gentleman, who didn't have a long retirement. I also had one in the RFA he was from Cork,I was bit older than him, due to my late return to sea. He went home on leave and didn't come back, we thought he had a nervous breakdown. I also sailed with a welshman,who I still get a Christmas card from,but as you say, I cant recall any scotsmen.
You've just reminded me; I once met an RO who was home on leave in West Cork. His name was Dick Organ.

Brian
 

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Totally non PC but as I is one I feel free to bandy the term about with gay abandon.

Paddy and **** are interchangeable as dozens of Irish Jokes refer to.
The Irish Guards are fondly known as the ***** as is the Scots Guards known as the Jocks.

But back to reality, in 10 years sailing with Marconi Men 80 to 90% of them were from southern Ireland and strangely none were from Scotland.
Wiley Scots know to avoid when there's a wrong'un signed-on below.
 
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