Ships Nostalgia banner

21 - 34 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
739 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Perhaps they didn't like the idea of a female officer and one that was not doing her job correctly.
Don't they have a cabin full of radar and stuff with a responsible officer in charge?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,337 Posts
The young are better at 'inclusiveness' (although I am not sure how much of it is down to the social engineering of a short lived product). Is the demographic of RN seastaff of an age where inclusiveness is not just an aspiration to be lip served but genuine(ish).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,337 Posts
Not really a convincing 'pardon!' to one who had his young lady ETO manoeuvred out when her usefulness as a presentable face in passenger accommodation ran out of passenger ship in which her continuing presentability ceased to be a lever.

(An episode where I was distinguished only by my silent acquiescence).

The morning brings me the realisation that last night's (above) is unintentionally disingenuous. My interests lay in the provision and support of technically competent 'servants'. If society requires that their employment must be also contingent on the demographic being balanced by other attributes unrelated to the primary task then don't expect me to engage (especially when there are plenty of those wishing to engage against).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,765 Posts
There is always that to consider John, as I alluded in #5.
One can wonder at what point the bridge team noticed a problem looming, how long did they wait until mentioning it, timing might have been the key.
Until someone writes their memoirs we will never know what the 'team' relationship might have been.
I'd forgotten about the cast of thousands that they have on navy ships. How come the whole lot of them weren't in the cart? You'd think at least one of them would have said: "Ahem, there's a fishing boat out here." The idea of a board meeting to discuss a change of course is interesting too."

John T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
A Royal Navy officer has been fined £4,000 after a warship narrowly avoided crashing into a fishing boat.
Lt Rebecca Stanley, 31, admitted to negligently hazarding a ship while aboard Plymouth-based HMS Sutherland in the North Sea on 5 June last year.
Bulford Court in Wiltshire heard how Lt Stanley had shut the blackout curtains to complete other work while in charge of the ship's look-out.
Assistant Judge Alan Large told her she would be "severely reprimanded".
Lt Stanley was supposed to be in charge of the ship's lookout between 01:00 and 04:00 BST during her night-shift.
Instead she decided to prepare for a manoeuvre she had no experience of, away from her duties.
The court heard how Lt Stanley told a colleague that if anyone asked "she wasn't behind the curtain".
'Wrong and foolish'
At the time the frigate was being operated by an officer who could not keep a visual look out and had "an extremely limited picture" of where other vessels were, the court was told.
As a result, the 4,000 tonne warship came within just 600 yards (548 metres) of a 118ft (36 metre) long Dutch fishing boat, which had to change direction at the last minute.
Prosecuting, Lt Solomon Hartley told the court: "She thought she had it all under control.
"She didn't have things under control and had things turned out differently she could have collided with the Jan Cornelis."
Defending, Commander Kay Chadwick said Stanley had not been "sleeping or using her phone".
Lt Stanley told the court: : "It was wrong and foolish of me to put the ship in that situation… I let myself and the ship's company down".
"Words cannot justify how sorry I am for the damage I almost caused."



How many people on the bridge at night? Two? Five? Ten? Only OOW? Where were the lookouts, radar people, juniors etc?
Usually at least two officers on watch on the bridge after sundown. Funny, I would have thought that after the RN gave up their liquior allotments they could afford more watch officers. Well anyway they still have seamen (almost forgot) sailors.😜
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
A Royal Navy warship nearly crashed into a fishing boat - after the officer on look-out closed the curtains and couldn't see where she was going.
Lieutenant Rebecca Stanley shut a ‘blackout curtain’ so she could get on with other work during the night shift ( perhaps a bit of dhobying and ironing) on type 23 frigate HMS Sutherland, a court martial heard.
Lt Stanley even told a surprised colleague on the ship’s bridge that if anyone asked ‘she wasn't behind the curtain’.
The court heard that as she couldn't see outside, the frigate was being operated by an officer who could not keep a visual look out and had ‘an extremely limited picture’ of where other vessels were . And they want equality, well rig the grating and break out the 'Cat o' Nine Tails'.
Its becoming too much like the USN.
That could be squared away in no time if the USN would break out the rum tots and the Royal Navy sober up. Down the hatch!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
she was probably fixing her hair or checking her make up ? far more important than looking out for other ships. The other question what is the range of the ships radar? as I recall it was 5 miles ranging out to 40 plus miles the occasional peep would have alerted her surely..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Are merchant ships required to officially record " near miss" incidents as civil aircraft are? I ask because this thread brought to mind an incident on a steam turbine VLCC back in the 70's; I was 3/E and the ship was running with unmanned engine room, either Indian Ocean or Persian Gulf. I was duty engineer with alarms switched to my cabin, and I got called from my scratcher around 5am by the flashing red LED's ( the rat's eyes ) and the penetrating squeaker. Leapt out, donned boily and boots, and scampered down to the control room. All hell had broken loose, the turbines had tripped on low vacuum, boilers shutting down on high pressure, God knows what else. I don't know why I didn't press the general engineers alarm, and because I had answered the original alarm in time it didn't wake the C/E. We had been running the condenser on "scoop" circulation, and I could see that the vacuum was actually recovering by itself, so I was able to reset everything and get the show back on the road by myself from the control room. I phoned the bridge and told them we were back underway, logged everything , left things on UMS and went topsides. There I saw from the wake that we had damn near done a 90 degree turn and there was another ship on our beam. The sudden turn had reduced the flow through the condenser scoop causing everything to trip. I went and phoned the Mate on the bridge to ask what had happened , but I just got blanked, he was clearly not going to admit to me that anything untoward had happened. I didn't pursue it - it was all in the E/R log anyway and all the engineers knew - but I often wondered if the Old Man was ever told. Maybe he was, and just decided to draw a veil over it - no harm done, no unnecessary report to make to the company. But I would be interested to know, are ships legally required to report "near misses"?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,337 Posts
If that was an unplanned manoeuvre necessary to avoid a collision then I think 'yes'. Try MGN 564 - I don't think all the IMO incidents are included except in as much as they are dangerous but I cannot access an IMO/SOLAS description at the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,012 Posts
Steve , can you remember which side was the other ship on when you saw it ?.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Steve , can you remember which side was the other ship on when you saw it ?.
Sorry John, I could not. It was forty-odd years ago, and nowadays I have trouble remembering what I had for breakfast. I just recall the other vessel as being much closer than I had seen one before while full away on passage. I'm quite sure that there was no whistle signal from our vessel though, or everybody would have been out of bed. Reflecting on the incident though, she was built in 73-74 and very well equipped, so would she have had some sort of helm movement recorder on the bridge? We certainly had full alarm printout in the ER. The thing that I remember most is that nobody seemed to want to talk about it, which made me suspect that we might have been partly in the wrong. I'll never know now, that's for sure.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,337 Posts
My turn to be the anorak.

Why did the main circ not cut in automatically when the scoop flow fell too low (requirement for UMS steamer, surely). I would almost have expected a blackout due insufficient spinning reserve rather than an almost graceful failure (or turned graceful by your intervention).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
My turn to be the anorak.

Why did the main circ not cut in automatically when the scoop flow fell too low (requirement for UMS steamer, surely). I would almost have expected a blackout due insufficient spinning reserve rather than an almost graceful failure (or turned graceful by your intervention).
A good question. I haven't been thinking about it for 13 days , though, just haven' t been online. I think it is quite possible that the main circ did start up, (no chance now of remembering the full details), but the dip in the vacuum was enough to trip. As I said before , what I remember most clearly is that no one topsides seemed to want to talk about the evasive action.
 
21 - 34 of 34 Posts
Top