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I should have remembered that, or at least have had the sense to ask myself why we did not use it. But things are becoming increasingly less clear to me. By the way, it was not "Sjømannskirken" (the seamen's church) who distributed the films, but rather "Sjømannsvelferden" (the seamen's welfare office). The two cooperated of course, but I shudder when I consider what kind of films we would have been offered had it been the church who picked them.
Stein, thanks for reminding me, I had forgot about the "Sjømannsvelferden". I think that we used to have a one Krone deduction from our pay to go to them..

Cheers Frank
 

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Only ship I saw films on was the Empire Halladale a trooper the screen was out on deck the only film I remember was a do***entary of midget car racing show every night crap.
 

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Hi, I was in school in the 60s. In the late 60s one of the science teachers started the "Sixth form scientific film society". The title pretty much says it all. I became a projectionist at this. When I went to university, I went to the film society. As I could run a 16mm projector I was told that I was on the committee. We projected in a very large room and had no problems at all with image brightness.

We would rent movies that were only 3 or 4 years old as well as much older ones.

After university I went to sea with Denholms it was all Sony Umatic video players. Every time a starting air compressor kicked on, the frequency and volts would drop, the picture would go to crap and then return after a few seconds.

There were official policies about changing the videos but we'd swap with any other ship given half a chance.
 

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Hi, I was in school in the 60s. In the late 60s one of the science teachers started the "Sixth form scientific film society". The title pretty much says it all. I became a projectionist at this. When I went to university, I went to the film society. As I could run a 16mm projector I was told that I was on the committee. We projected in a very large room and had no problems at all with image brightness.

We would rent movies that were only 3 or 4 years old as well as much older ones.

After university I went to sea with Denholms it was all Sony Umatic video players. Every time a starting air compressor kicked on, the frequency and volts would drop, the picture would go to crap and then return after a few seconds.

There were official policies about changing the videos but we'd swap with any other ship given half a chance.
Videos were supplied from office, about ten per month -- until it was noticed they were copied, illegally! Instructions were to ensure no pirate DVDs, etc were onboard when old video tapes had company logo on them!!
Dannic
 

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Hi Dannic.
DVDs came out in 1995. The video recording we had back when I was sea were more like stone age cave paintings.

The U-matic format came out in 1969 but was limited by cost to industrial and commercial users. The machines we had at sea were players only and would not record.

Domestic video recorders only came on the market while I was at sea. I bought my first one in September 1978, just after coming home from Singapore after 6 months on the Sig Ragne. It was identical to this one, except it was badged "Ferguson". It weighed a ton, being built on a steel chassis, with the mechanism being diecast aluminium.
Copying from U-matic to that would have resulted in really crap picture quality.
 

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We had a video player/recorder on Barber Priam. One of the reel capstans broke and it was a "priority" job to machine a new one. Very successful. We must have watched "10" with Bo Derek over a dozen times!

On older ships, we had the film projector as above.

Films or videos, we used to look for known companies in port where maybe a mate was.

One famous episode was Port Elizabeth/Newark (New York) where I knew a couple of engineers on a Swire ship. Managed to exchange Carling Black Label ([email protected] medicine!) for Ozzie Swan, movies and a free bar to boot. Had to carry the 2R/O (Supersonic, Kevin Gaughan) back to the ship. Anyone know of Kevin, from Greasby?

Rgds.
Dave
 

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We had Bell & Howell movie projectors on Elder Dempster ships and films were usually shown across No. 4 hatch. During one voyage the projector gave up the ghost and examination found a main gear wheel (made of plastic) had stripped all its teeth. It seemed no more movies for the rest of the voyage but on a whim I visited the Photographic department of the Kingsway in Lagos to see if they sold spares. Within minutes I had a new gear wheel which was installed by the Lecky and all was well with the world!
 

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I read a book years ago on the operating and sinking of the Torry Canyon and apparently the crew got films to watch but these were only changed whenever the ship docked in San Pedro, LA.
I don't know if Union Oil were able to get films for Italian speakers, otherwise it was a great oppertunity for the crew to improve their English!
 

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i just wonder what is the problem is there one?
I have worked in my younger days for a shipping company of european management, managing many vessels under various flag states and in saying this, crews of various nationalities.
In the 60;s while at sea the red duster, and british registered shipping companies, I was only aware of white crew entrainment, and for this the film service offered by the Shipping Library service, run by the seamans educational society.
In my ignorance I am unaware if we had an asiactic/foriegn crew they were not issued with dedicated local language films: However they were invited to watch the as issued english language films.
I just wonder what the modern seafares welfare societies in the international ports of the world [Rotterdam-in europe] what they may now offer?
Further on a flagged ship in 2019 what are the off watch facilities for entertainment relaxation, with modern officers and crew being multinational in the truest sense of the word.
Is it all TV's and satellite services for tv and telephones?
 

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i just wonder what is the problem is there one?
I have worked in my younger days for a shipping company of european management, managing many vessels under various flag states and in saying this, crews of various nationalities.
In the 60;s while at sea the red duster, and british registered shipping companies, I was only aware of white crew entrainment, and for this the film service offered by the Shipping Library service, run by the seamans educational society.
In my ignorance I am unaware if we had an asiactic/foriegn crew they were not issued with dedicated local language films: However they were invited to watch the as issued english language films.
I just wonder what the modern seafares welfare societies in the international ports of the world [Rotterdam-in europe] what they may now offer?
Further on a flagged ship in 2019 what are the off watch facilities for entertainment relaxation, with modern officers and crew being multinational in the truest sense of the word.
Is it all TV's and satellite services for tv and telephones?
I would guess that on a modern day ship with so few crew members and they are only onboard for a short periods maybe they are not bothered about watching films, when you are probably alone in the mess when you are off duty...

Frank
 

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I was on a cruise in North Pacific a couple of year back and the crew from the Philippines had their own films in both English and Filipino.

geoff
 

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NZ Shipping Co / Federal Steam ships had films delivered two or three times a trip. Job of showing the films was 2R/O responsibility. Cant remember how many film reels I spliced after overheating when projector jammed, or, as in the case of Bo Derek raising from the sea, when the crew asked my to pause the film. Two films I specifically remember were Billy Budd and Mutiny on the Bounty which kept cycling back on board, possible to warn us not to mutiny:)
 

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Films atSea

I can recall back in the 60's when i was eng. on the ss Athenic which carried about 80 1st. class passengers when the weather was suitable a makeshift canvas screen was rigged between the samson posts of no.5 hatch in the evening and movies were shown. It was quite humerous at times if the 8-12 watch decided to blow tubes and pre-heaters during the screening as on many occasions the screen would be damaged by hot soot from the funnel.
 
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