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Michael Taylor;2960131. Every ship I joined it was carried by hand onto planes if we joined overseasthis?".[/QUOTE said:
I carried mine always right from first Third Mate. A nuisance to carry but once on board it was mine and enjoyable use.

On a BA flight one night, Bermuda to Heathrow the stewardess came to me and invited to come up the fight deck. Spent three hours up there.

Stephen
 

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I flew into Manila looking to engage an experienced tug crew. Jesus, a Philipino tug Captain, in trouble with the authorities for breaking an employment contract whilst operating his tug in the Mekong River. Vietnam and Cambodia where dangerous places in the early seventies. His nerve cracked when the chicken wire he had rigged to catch and protect his wheelhouse from rockets fired by Vietcong wasn’t up to the job. I talked him into bringing his whole crew of experienced tugboat men to join me. The main part of the two year deal we signed was that I teach him celestial navigation. As not one of them spoke a word of English a large part of the bridge wing deck was painted with blackboard paint and many balls of chalk used to communicate by numbers and stick men. Neither he nor his first mate had ever set eyes on Admiralty tables but with perseverance and patience I had them crossing a longitude by chronometer with a meridian altitude in six weeks. A running fix in months and star sights by the end of the year. They found using the instrument of double reflection on a bouncy wee tug the most difficult.
 

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I took Second Mates in Hull in 1964 and baught an old Hillman Minx for £50. After passing I sold the car for £55 and bought a brand new B Cookes Super Kingston sextant and had a little change left over! The car cost me nothing therefore and the sextant served me well until I came ashore.

Howard
Found a Cooke's catalogue circa about 1960
 

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Found a Cooke's catalogue circa about 1960
Many thanks for that. I remember that advert in Browns Almanac and that is exactly the model I bought! It served me well for many year and in some ways I wish I hadn't sold it when I eventually came ashore.

Howard
 

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All,
My first sextant was a three circle, a Heath if memory serves, sold to me by Captain Bulmer on my first trip as an Uncert. Third Mate in MV Trelyon.
I swapped it for a Freiburger in HK it cost £90-00 I sold it on to an aspiring Navigator some twenty years later, alas the arrival of GPS saw it off.
It is just now a talking point at his home after dinner parties......

Yours aye,
slick
 

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I was standing on deck of the Navua in Auckland talking to the just joined new third Mate,. Up the Gangway came the master Andy Keyworth, ex first mate of the Parmir and a stickler for everything nautical .
I said "good afternoon Captain"
He replied then said to the 3rd mate " you must be the new 3rd, do you have a sextant"
"No Sir, but never mind I will use the ship's "
The brusque reply was " No you won't , get one before we sail"
That saw the third chasing the sparkle looking for a sub to finance a cheap second hand unit in a hurry.

My son inherited his Grandfathers sextant and I recall playing with it on our front lawn trying to make sense of anything , there was not a lot of progress .
Speaking of good navigators , Scot Jim Cowie , Chief Engineer on the Kaitoa , had an understanding with the second mate whereby he got the nod re the ship's position and distance run etc late in the morning s before going out on deck at noon with a metre long straight edge and a Moore and Wright protractor type engineers square with a level bubble to squint at the sun/horison before jotting some figures down that closely tallied with the second mates . He fooled a few for a day or two , great guy great times.

Bob
 

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...Chief Engineer...…..going out on deck at noon with a metre long straight edge and a Moore and Wright protractor type engineers square with a level bubble to squint at the sun/horizon.....Bob
V funny Bob. Sad such jovialities (and similar) now mostly consigned to the past.
 

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I knew Graham later in the late 1970's and the youthful navigator in the picture doesn't look like the Graham I remember (but neither do I look like my teen age self!)

Howard
Howard

You may well be right. Back in 67 when I was cadet in the City of Brisbane the 1st Officer Bill Roberts [ ex THNS ] was on about the picture on Cookes advert in Browns NA being Grahm Bottrel but dont know if this was same picture. Its a THNS lad for sure,

Alan
 

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Howard

You may well be right. Back in 67 when I was cadet in the City of Brisbane the 1st Officer Bill Roberts [ ex THNS ] was on about the picture on Cookes advert in Browns NA being Grahm Bottrel but dont know if this was same picture. Its a THNS lad for sure,

Alan
The Cooke’s catalogue from which I copied the cover appears to have been printed in 1959. Whoever the model was would have been in their final year at THNS.
 

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Mine was given me by a retired Mate from a Border Tanker in 1958. Every ship I joined it was carried by hand onto planes if we joined overseas....often wonder how many times I would have been asked at customs in these days..."what is this?".
The sextant box was very handy for keeping do***entation in - plane ticket, professional 'ticket', Discharge Book, Seaman's Card, Passport etc. I imagine there were variations in space depending on the type of sextant box you had, mine was a Carl Zeiss Drum Sextant from the then East Germany and there was plenty of space beneath the Sextant to keep paperwork. Cost me £84.15 in 1973 from J.D. Potter Ltd on The Minories - I've still got the receipt, albeit a bit faded.
 

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Spent many happy hours mooching through J.D. Potter Ltd. I was good friends with one of the senior men, we shared a pub in Essex ( as patrons) in the mid 70"s.
No doubt you got discounts then!

The £84 odd that I paid was below official price as once I'd chosen the sextant I wanted I walked back to the Bank Line office in Bury Street and they ordered it from Potters as ship stores so getting shipowner's discount and an absence of purchase tax. I didn't see the sextant until I joined the ship!
 

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Went to the manager of lloyds Bank, Stanmore, for a £50 loan in 1955 in order to buy a sextant. Special appointment and a serious interview with arrangements to pay back monthly before he would agree to an advance!

Then went to Potters and bought a Kelvin Hughes model ( The two greatest names in navigation, I believe their Ad was). This served me well for 10 years worldwide in Bank Line. It took its place on the chartroom settee alongside the other sextants and the curly sandwiches at night.

We often joined ships in Liverpool, and I recall getting off the train at Lime St Station on one occasion, and the porter said, " I'll take the bags, and you look after your sextant!" - Such was the volume of ships in Liverpool in bygone days.
 

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#24 I know the lad, (won't name him) he was Hull Trinity House Navigation School Captain, never lived that advert down, as he was taking a supposed sight with all the shades down.

Just noticed someone has named him in a later post, yes it is Graham Botrill
 
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