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Dear All,
There is a book titled 'Hain of St Ives' by K.J.O'Donoghue and H.S.Appleyard published by the World Ship Society which gives a potted history of the company and many photographs.

There is also a great book titled '1700 miles in open boats' by Cecil Foster. This is the account of the loss of the S S Trevessa by her Master, this book has become quite collectable and if you see it you should grab it.

regards
Dave
 

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All,
Re the Trevessa's boats journey there are pieces of Memorial silver etc to this epic voyage in HQS Wellington on the Embankment.
Yours aye,


Slick
 

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Congratulations Maritiem on your time and typing skills to have put so much detail and facts into the Hain History on this site. Thank You.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I would like to thank all for the letters and information on the "Tre" boats.I had forgot about Trevessa day in Mauritius,we called in there for sugar,on Trevessa day,and had a great time at the seamans club.We were the first Tre boat to visit on Trevessa day.Happy memories,thanks again. George McMaster
 

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I started with Nourse Line in '61 on the Indus, then Kallada, Nurjehan, Trefusis (3 times) Tremayne, Atherstone, Kohinur, Trecarrell, Treneglos, Tremeadow and Trevalgan. So I have sailed with or am familiar with most of the names mentioned in the HN threads. It's just some of the faces that won't come back into focus. Talking of which, that is me, the good looking one, on the right in one of the Atherstone pics on Macphail's post above. Do you remember John, we used to share at least 6 cold beers after coming off watch at midnight and were sometimes still at it when the next watch came off at 0400. Might have been alright for you engine wallahs, replenishing lost body fluids, but it used to play havoc with my water works for the rest of the night. Oranjeboom was the worst offender, if I recall. The other 3rd Eng in your pics was Tim BREEN, who I sailed with again when he was Chief. I did keep the names of all earlier shipmates but neglected to do so after '66 so everything after that is a bit of a blur.
Some Masters' names that appear in my discharge book but not above include Ryan, Dodson, Darby, Abbott, Alexander, Robinson, Lister and Thorpe. Others I can't decipher, or remember. Sad, isn't it?
I was on Trefusis in Japan, late '69 ?, when we changed from white crew to Chinese, the first Hains ship to do so I think, certainly post war. That was probably the beginning of the end as the bean counters started to take control. I came ashore in '72 and look back on those days, when it wasn't an offence to enjoy yourself at work, with great fondness. There was never a dull moment, particularly on the white crew ships.
 

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Well I must say I enjoyed my time with Hains never found them Hungary I always thought it was Hungary Hogarth (Baron Boats) another well know tramp outfit.

Treboats I joined the Trelevan in Falmouth mid 63 story was she had been laid up for 9 months in the Fal she was in dry dock when we signed on what a mess not a stitch of rigging on her all those derricks and two Jumbos and we where due Cardiff , in three days to load steel pipes for the Gulf etc. Question is did you lay her up in the Fal in 62.

I had a very interesting experience in Hains. Skipper on the Trelevan was J M Downard. my second trip a year later was on the Treneglos when she ran aground in Timaru we arrived in Belfast nearly a year later and who walks up the gangway J M Downard he saw me and the first thing he said was hi Ron you sailing with us you can image what I said words like "No" and "after a year" an a few others that can't be detailed here. He replied no that's OK take some leave and join us after we have loaded round the coast. I some times wounder what would have happened if I had gone back I might even gone up the pipe to Midships. Still that's another story.

We had 2 Skippers on the Treneglos first was R B Oliver I believe He was called Rock Dodger Ben and real Gent the other skipper was the commodore he was on his last trip home and Skipper Oliver was going to be the Commodore of the Fleet as the Treneglos was Commodore ship of the Fleet but he had to stay behind for the court hearing
 

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You're right Ron, the Hungry title was usually applied to Hogarths and I never found Hains poor feeders either.
Their ships were no stranger to the Fal but I never stood by one there. I understand that a C/O and an apprentice would ship-keep and it was not uncommon for various bits and bobs of ships stores and equipment to end up in the local pubs in lieu of beer money. I expect that still goes on today.
The names Downard and Oliver both ring a bell but I never met either of them.
 

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Tec. Oliver was a real Gent in my 5 years at sea he was easily the best Skipper by a country mile and a real Seaman inspite of Timaru, but this open site is no place to talk about it.

Ron
 

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The Trelevan had been laid up the Fal, I paid off here there in the summer of 1962 and got some leave. I rejoined the four that were laid up, including Tremorvah and Tremeadow I think. Spent the winter of 62/63 aboard with just paraffin heaters and lamps so the Apprentices cabin ended up like the black hole of Calcutta due to the smoke. We spent most of out days moving coal from the galley bunkers of the three ships we were not living on to ours [forgotten which one it was] Cant remember whether we de-rigged the derricks or not either before we laid here up or while she was up the Fal. someone must have but I dont think we did it on the passage down to Falmouth and were only at anchor in Carrick Roads for 24 hours at the most so could not have done it there. Sorry can be more help than that.
 

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The laid up crew consisted of a Chief Officer, 2nd Engineer, Donkeyman, Chief and 2nd Stewards plus between 3 and 4 apprentices. yes TEC you are right some fool sold the ships bell [from the bridge wing] and it appeared in the Hope Inn which was the local for all the Apprentices. By some mischance the Superintendents visited the same pub when down to either receive or send off one the ships and spotted the bell. Lots of questions asked but no action. I am glad to say that I was not responsible for that one.
There was a C/O Cedric Ducker from Plymouth who later ran a pub in Penzance who was aboard during this period but didn't live aboard instead rented a house ashore in Mylor. I will keep my council at this point. and proceed no further.

Martin
 

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Thanks for the reply Treboats The way the rigging was stowed I would think it was done in 5 minuets and just thrown down in to the hold it was a real nightmare, a real birds nest I would not think it was you more like a deck crowd paying off and working on the principle of job and knock. Any way thanks again it's confirmed my thoughts you paid off and laid her up and we came 9 months later and picked her up. She had spent 3/5 days in a dry dock I think before we walked up the gangway. There were 3 apprentices already on board I don't know if you were laid up with them. One had a pair of Lincoln Green Boots. Nick named (Robin Hood) The names are as follows P.V. Grainger / B.J. Thompson and A J Fawdon.

Regards Ron
 

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Ron

No I wasn't up the Fal with any of them but Pete Grainger joined Hains at the same time as I did, we both left Worcester at the same time together with "Mouse" Clark. Tony Fawdon was also on the Worcester with me. His father was a BOAC Pilot based in Hong Kong, hence Tony got the nick name Chow. I have not seen or rearly heard from either of them since I left Worcester in 1961 !!

Its always possible that the apprentices derigged the running gear, and bearing in mind the conditions we were living in which when I think about it was rather appaling. As a ship came in they might just have dumped it down the hatch as there was no power either electric or steam, so everything would have been handraulic.

I do remember opening up the corners of one of the hatches to let some ventilation in, only to see an army of rats running around in the lower hold. Amused ourselves by trying to drop hatch wedges on them - such is the amusment of the young !!

regards Martin Tregoning [AKA Treboats]
 

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Hi Treboats

Thanks for your reply It's great that we new a couple of people all those years ago Tony was the one we called Robin Hood as he had these Lincoln Green Boots. He got himself into a bit of trouble in Falmouth and I remember that he was worried that he would be kicked out and sent home he was a bit worried what his Dad would say. (It's amazing what you remember) another little antidote. Up the Gulf we were all sleeping on the poop we all swung our iron framed beds from the awning's. Then one afternoon all 3 apprentices
came out of midships carrying a bed we all thought they were coming to join us. No they were carrying the 2nd's Steward bed (He who was as queer as a £2 pound) and they were laughing like drains as they were under instructions to swing it right next to mine. I was lucky as I new what side my bread was buttered after 2 days the bed went back, but every one had a good laugh. The boys from midships where great fun and we all had a great laugh on that trip. We got up to quite a bit of mischief on that trip, but all in the best possible taste.

When we got to Cardiff we took on another EDH and he had sailed on her before he told us that she was crawling with cockroaches you only had to bang the bulkhead's and they would come runing out, thats just to run with your rats story. I think the old tramps would carry a lot of wild life one way and another.

Ron
 

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I attended a Trevessa day party at the seamans club Mauritius back in the late 60s whilst serving as assistant steward aboard Trevalgan.She was a completely different ship to what I had sailed in before and areal eyeopener, but I enjoyed most of the 6 month voyage
 

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hi joined the hain norse ships in jul 69 i sailed m.v.trebartha twice m.v.trecarne m.v.benwyvis m.v.benattow m.v.bengloe left in 1972 had a great time seen the world three times i trained on t.s.dolphin at leith docks ronnie maben.
 

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treboats,
Your reference to Captain Horace ----- set me thinking and trawling the memory banks, and whilst shaving it came to me Captain Horace Gravell !!
Captain Penberthy was the last Captain I sailed with in Hains he came out to bring the Trewidden home after the death of Captain JJ Reilly in 1969.

Yours aye,

Slick
I sailed as an apprentice with Captain Reilly on the Nurmahal in 67.I herd later that he dissapered overboard. Was this true?

I joined HN in 65 and sailed on the Trevalgan,Cotswold,Nurmahal,Trecarrell,Trewidden, Atherstone and Trebartha.

John
 

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what a great story i read the hole lot i was on the m.v.trebartha 69 two times then m.v.trecarne i had the best time seen the world like Africe Inia persiangulf Australia panamacanal all great ports and more i miss the sea very much thank you for a great life.ronnie maben.
 

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I arrived in Timaru on the Port Wyndham in 1964 (or65) just as the Treneglos left. She then hit the reef leaving port. A bit of trouble when the boys came ashore and tried to hook up with their girl-friends who sadly had in the meantime hitched up with the Port Line boys. (*))
 

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Thank you everyone for all that fantastic information.

I have been researching The Hain's other/2nd ship to be known as The SS Treveal (official No: 142573); which was initially ordered as WW1 'Liberty' type vessel, laid down at the yard of Caird & Company, Glasgow, in 1918, she was to have been named 'War Jonquil' (as far as I'm aware), however before she'd been completed, the war had ended and she was bought by The Hain Co along with around another 15 vessels, fitted out at Harland & Wolf, launched in Sept 1919, she was 400ft long, gross tonnage -5,243 tons(registered-3,226 tons) built to carry dry cargo e.g. jute, manganese ore. Her Captain was Charles Paynter of St Ives Cornwall who served with the company for about 15 years.

Sadly and tragically The SS Treveal (II) ran aground on the Kimmeridge Ledges not far from Hounstout Cliff at Chapmans Pool, Purbeck Coast, Dorset- January 9th/10th 1920, as a result of misguiding, misjudgments, and misinterpretations, and as a result of the severe weather conditions, poor visibility, sleet etc; the crew were ordered to abandon ship and head for the shore towards Chapmans Pool the Starboard lifeboat had been torn from the ship. Only 7 of the 43 crew survived to tell the tale.

On-board were two unnamed Tynesiders; how could this have been the case, why were their names not logged with the Hain Co ? (any info, ideas or assumptions would be much appreciated) Only 16 bodies were recovered and two were never identified.

Probably the worst thing and one of the saddest things, in fact the most shocking thing of all, when I visited the St Ives Museum in Cornwall; there in a display cabinet is the final wage slip sent to the grieving mother of one of the lost crew with 'Deductions for Drowning etc'.

I have written a short journal entitled 'The Legend of The SS Treveal' most of it is based on personal experiences and hand-me-down stories, some research on the inquiry, poems etc. but I have no intentions of publishing it as yet, however my desire is to be able to envisage life on board the SS Treveal and in particular the passage from Dundee to Calcutta, plus gather extra information relating to communication methods from ship to ship, and ship-to shore, shore leave activities etc during her era. So again this thread and everyone's stories have not only been a joy to read, some have made me chuckle too. Brilliant! Oh and by the way I wont be nicking any of your stuff I promise.
 
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