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One of many Oberon class subs built by Scotts' at Greenock for various navies,in this case the Royal Australian Navy in 1977.This was taken about June as she handed over in Greenock.
She had a sister,OTAMA which I think has become a museum in Australia.
 

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Fairfield said:
One of many Oberon class subs built by Scotts' at Greenock for various navies,in this case the Royal Australian Navy in 1977.This was taken about June as she handed over in Greenock.
She had a sister,OTAMA which I think has become a museum in Australia.

There were six Oberons built for the RAN....Oxley, Otway, Ovens, Onslow (ordered 1963) and a further two.... Orion, Otama ordered in 1970.
When the class were progressively replaced some six years ago by the Australian built Collins Class the Onslow was presented to the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney and the Otama went to the West coast for the Maritime Museum in Fremantle. The ANMM in Sydney also houses the Daring Class Destroyer HMAS Vampire and there are persistent rumours that when the Oliver Hazard Perry Class of frigates finally pay off from the RAN that two of them will be presented to the museums on the East/West coasts respectively.
In addition the replica of the HMS Endurance, which has spent much of its time since building sailing around the world, is expected to make its permanent home with the ANMM in Sydney.
 

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I can assure you will, one of the other vessels there is the "Krait", you may have heard of her...she was used for the two Commando raids carried out on Singapore Harbour in WW2. One very successful, one not so successful. Check your local library if you want to do a bit of pre reading..few books about the raids.."Operation Jaywick" is one that I can remember. She was originally built in Japan in the years after the 1st World War, used as a fishing vessel, coastal trader etc and ended up in the Islands north of Oz before WW2. She was appropriated and someone finally put it togethat and decided she was emminently suitable for a raid. She is still in good nick but I believe that they have now replaced the original engine following some major problems. If you are lucky you might even see her under weigh!!.
 

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Fairfield,
I couldn't agree with you more, why can't we follow their example ?, even better why can't we follow the Yank's example of ship preservation and museums ?.
Regards
W. Dillon. (Cloud)
 

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The Submarine preserved in Western Australia is HMAS Ovens. She is out of the water on a slipway next to the WA Maritime Museum.
 

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The disposition of the six RAN Oberons is as follows:
Orion—paid off in WA 9.9.1996 Don't know final fate
Otama—paid off in WA 15.12.2000. Towed to Hastings near Flinders Naval Depot in Victoria in April 2002 for display. I believe that funding issues have prevented this from being given proper effect.
Oxley—paid off in WA 13.2.1992. BU locally at Jervoise Bay from 9.3.1992, completed 12.10.1992
Otway—paid off at Sydney 17.2.1994. BU in Sydney 1996, conning tower placed as an exhibit beside Hume Highway at Holbrook NSW (about 400 miles from the sea!) on 27.10.1995. Holbrook was originally called Germantown and was changed for obvious reasons in WW1 in honour of a RN submarine captain who won the VC at the Dardanelles—hence the sub connection.
Ovens—paid off in WA 1.12.1995. Towed to Fremantle 17.11.1998 for preservation at WA Maritime Museum.
Onslow—paid off at Sydney 29.3.1999. Transferred to Australian National Maritime Museum at Sydney 15.4.1999 and opened to public from 1.6.1999
 

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I can assure you will, one of the other vessels there is the "Krait", you may have heard of her...she was used for the two Commando raids carried out on Singapore Harbour in WW2. One very successful, one not so successful. Check your local library if you want to do a bit of pre reading..few books about the raids.."Operation Jaywick" is one that I can remember. She was originally built in Japan in the years after the 1st World War, used as a fishing vessel, coastal trader etc and ended up in the Islands north of Oz before WW2. She was appropriated and someone finally put it togethat and decided she was emminently suitable for a raid. She is still in good nick but I believe that they have now replaced the original engine following some major problems. If you are lucky you might even see her under weigh!!.
Yes, Doug, the ANMM in Sydney is well worth a visit. Spent the better part of a day there last year and, despite carrying my young baby son around in one of those harnesses for most of the time there (he slept for hours), I really enjoyed it.

One thing that stuck me (literally) is how little headroom there was in some quarters in HMAS Vampire. I'm 6' 4'' and couldn't stand straight a lot of the time. Don't know how some sailors managed running to action stations without banging their heads into something. I remember thinking the same thing in the HMAS Diamantina (River Class) in Brisbane.

Didn't see the Krait at the ANMM but came across it later searching the NAA website. They have do***ents about Jaywick and a bunch of other SOE operations available through RecordSearch. All top secret, hush hush at the time, of course, but open to the public now. Interesting reading. To find the SOE files that are viewable, enter [email protected] into Keywords and A3269 (the series number) into Reference numbers. That brings up about 170 files.

regards,
Martin
 

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Melliget,
let me assure you that you usually only hit your head on overheads once,in the same place any way I am 5-10 and I managed to hit various places during training drills, my mess was 2-charlie up forward next to Alpha turret's gun bay little bit cramped but it appears to be the best of a bad bunch, Vampire was and still is my favourite ship, Dale
 
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