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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am very proud to be master of m.v. Jervis Bay. She may not be the biggest, most modern or fastest container ship in the world, but she does, I believe, have the proudest name.
A.P.Moller / Maersk intend changing her name to Maersk Dalton as part of their takeover of P&O Nedlloyd. To be fair, they have not yet done so even though every other British ship in the former Blue Star / P&O Nedlloyd fleet has had their named changed.
I wonder what other forum members think? Is it fair to ask Maersk to keep this famous name?
 

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Cap'n Pete said:
I am very proud to be master of m.v. Jervis Bay. She may not be the biggest, most modern or fastest container ship in the world, but she does, I believe, have the proudest name.
A.P.Moller / Maersk intend changing her name to Maersk Dalton as part of their takeover of P&O Nedlloyd. To be fair, they have not yet done so even though every other British ship in the former Blue Star / P&O Nedlloyd fleet has had their named changed.
I wonder what other forum members think? Is it fair to ask Maersk to keep this famous name?
Sir
It would be a crying shame to take a name like that away especially after the heroics her predeccesor went thro
 

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Cap'n Pete,

Yes of course it is fair to ask the company to keep the name.

I for one would be sad to see the name consigned to history. Your ship is a reminder to us all of a great ship with a proud history that saved many at a great cost.

We always had a tradition of naming new ships after old especially during the war years. When one was sunk a new ship carried the old name thus remembering those who went before. This was true of both the RN and MN.

No doubt some will say: "what's in a name"?

Cap'n, I hope you sail aboard the Jervis Bay for a good while yet.

Best wishes
 

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Well said Hugh.

A very proud name in British Maritime History, keep it going, there are enough people trying to strip us of our history.

Long may she sail under the name of Jervis Bay.

Chris.
 

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jervis bay

|take it that your vessel cannot be the old OCL vessel the only British built vessel of the six original bay container ships?
She was certainly the best - built to imperial rather than metric measure. So did not suffer from the same vibration problems
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
waiwera said:
|take it that your vessel cannot be the old OCL vessel the only British built vessel of the six original bay container ships?
She was certainly the best - built to imperial rather than metric measure. So did not suffer from the same vibration problems
No, the present Jervis Bay was built in 1992, the first of a new class of 4,000 teu plus container ships meant to replace the "Baby Bays".

Please find attached a photo of the Jervis Bay taken earlier this year in Kingston.
 

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Congratulations Cap'n Pete.

You know and we know the pride we take in that revered name "Jervis Bay", but sadly, who else does?
Certainly not some foreign ship owner. Even if they did, would they care about British history?. Not on your life! If they got to know the significance, all the more quicker they'd change it.
I remember the "Jervis Bay" event when it happened.
There's a song or poem written about it and "gallant Captain Fegan". He was awarded the Victoria Cross posthumously, the only civilian to receive that honor ever, strictly because he was RNR and "Jervis Bay" flew the Blue Ensign.

Head up and chest out when you walk ashore Cap'n Pete.........Peter (Applause)
 

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Good Afternoon All,
Whilst browsing around a Bookstall with the usual selection of secondhand books, I came across a book titled Poems of Spirit and Action and within a poem or rather epic story of the AMC Jervis Bay I'll quote the lines that caught my eye,

" On either side the Jervis Bay the convoy was dipping
And the Captain as he paced the bridge paused one hand gripping
A stanchion, to study them against the amber rim
Of sky -the ships whose safety was entrusted to him,
They spread a broad battalion, massed in columns nine abreast,
There Trewellard, Cornish City, San Demetrio - North-by-North West
Was it smoke or cloud? - Castillian, Rangitiki , and the rest.
Satisfied, he turned to go below; when a sudden gleam
Flickered in the North, and a shout from a lookout, "Ship on the port beam."
Two seconds, and Captain's glasses rake the horizon to norrard,
Two more, and the bells ring Action Stations. Aft, midships, forrard,"
And so on truly a saga.
It was written by Michael Thwaites and the book bears an undecipherable school name stamp on the flyleaf from 1960.
Michael Thwaites would appear to be a seaman as his phraseology is seamanlike.
I would like to think that someone somewhere learnt something of the Merchant Navy in Wartime.
Yours aye,
Slick
 

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Capt Pete;
If you look in my Gallery you will see a couple of pictures of the Jervis Bay Memorial in Saint John New Brunswick Canada ,
Also check out Stuart Smiths Gallery under Maidan which was a Brocklebank ship lost in the same convoy . Stuart has a very excellent account of the Valiant Jervis Bay and Capt Foggerty V.C
Derek
 

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dom

it would be good to keep the name,not for a place,but for what she did and why it was done,and last but not least for all the seamen in that convoy those who lost their lives and those who did the next trip,and the next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Derek Roger said:
Capt Pete;
If you look in my Gallery you will see a couple of pictures of the Jervis Bay Memorial in Saint John New Brunswick Canada ,
Also check out Stuart Smiths Gallery under Maidan which was a Brocklebank ship lost in the same convoy . Stuart has a very excellent account of the Valiant Jervis Bay and Capt Foggerty V.C
Derek
Derek,
Many thanks for this. In the allyway between mine and the chief's cabin are a huge (and I mean huge) number of testimonials, photographs and other items including (and not least) those provided by the Jervis Bay Memorial custodians in Canada.
For interest, other items include a Victoria Cross, the chief engineer's discharge book open at the last entry "vessel lost to enemy action", Winston Churchill's speech on the Jervis Bay delivered to Parliment, pictures, photographs, newspaper cuttings, etc. etc. Even testimonials from a small troop of sea cadets in Reading who's "ship" is also called the Jervis Bay.
As I walk from my cabin to the bridge every day I am reminded of the great sacrifice our fathers made to defend our country in time of war. However, when I say good morning to my Ukrainian chief engineer and Filipino OOW I sometimes wonder who were the real victors (and I mean no disrespect to any or our crew in saying that).
If Maersk do change our ships name I hope they will flag out the ship at the same time. Somehow, I would not longer feel myself worthy of the honour of maintaining this memorial to some very brave men.
Cap'n Pete
 

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Survival rate

At a recent Remembrance Day service the 1st Sea Lord, I believe it was, stated that if you joined the Army during WW2 you had a 1 in 28 chance of being killed. If you joined the RN you had a 1 in 18 chance of being killed. But if you joined the Merchant Navy you had a 1 in 5 chance of being killed. Yet how many representatives of the MN do we ever see in the march past the cenotaph?

Not strictly relevant to a thread about the Jervis Bay but I thought the figures might be useful when discussions take place about the role of the MN in wartime.

Rusty
 

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Yes, the name Jervis Bay should be kept. It is a reminder of the bravery and ultimate sacrifices made by thousands of Allied Merchant Seamen in WW2.

On a more cynical note though, there is not a cat in hells chance. Cap'n Pete sums it up when he makes mention of his multi-national crew.

Shipowners haven't changed much in 60 years - in the war your wages stopped when your ship was sunk, no matter how long it took to get back to the UK.

Sentimentality and history don't produce shareholder profits.
 

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Thought you might be interested. Follow this link to the INA - The French National Video Archive - http://www.ina.fr/voir_revoir/guerre/mondiales/41-48.fr.html#11
If you click on the yellow image to the right of the picture of the cruiser you can watch some footage of shipping being shelled - if I am not wrong the Jervis Bay is mentioned. I would suggest watching without the sound as the commentary is in French and the images are Vichy régime newsreel but it gives an idea of what it was like to be sunk by shelling and the conditions the seamen endured. I particularly dislike the movietone style background music which reminds me of a jolly report on a football match.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Very interesting piece of film and, yes, it does mention the "Jervis Bay". Just as well I do not understand French or I might dislike the French even more after watching this Vichy propoganda.
I commanded an ex French ship some years ago (PONL Lyttleton, ex Lafayette). This ship had a number of tapered wooden plugs in the focs'le store for plugging shell holes in the hull. These were variously marked "British 4 inch" etc. As the ship was built in the mid-1980's you have to wonder who the French still regard as their enemy.
 

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An even more cynical note....

Colwyn Grace said:
Yes, the name Jervis Bay should be kept. It is a reminder of the bravery and ultimate sacrifices made by thousands of Allied Merchant Seamen in WW2.

On a more cynical note though, there is not a cat in hells chance. Cap'n Pete sums it up when he makes mention of his multi-national crew.

Shipowners haven't changed much in 60 years - in the war your wages stopped when your ship was sunk, no matter how long it took to get back to the UK.

Sentimentality and history don't produce shareholder profits.
Quote from The Bank for International Settlements:- "International Finance recognises no borders and owes no loyalty."
 

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FYI there was another V.C. awarded postumously to a Captain Bisset Smith whose ship the s.s Otaki was sunk by the commerce raider Moewe off the Azores on March 17 th 1917.
 

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Just a thought. Would some 7,000 emails from SN subscribers help to convince A.P Moller to keep the name?
From past dealings with them, they may be very astute shipowners but the Moller/Maersk family have always been honorable Gentlemen.
From Capt. Pete's description of the valuable memorabilia on board the "Jervis Bay", they just might be delighted to keep the name if the facts were brought to their personal attention.
 
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