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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Any past inmates of this august institution out there? There must be some who still remember Penywern Road and still have their sanity intact? I'm thinking 1976-1978/9 or therabouts or indeed anyone who can confirm that the place wasn't a figment of my imagination....?

Martin (POP)
 

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British School of Telegraphy/London Electronics College

Hi Martin,

Nope - it wasn't a figment of your imagination. I was there from 1969 to 1971 and left with 2nd Class PMG and many fond memories.

I remember Dave Evans, of course, the Principal - his Dad was still knocking about downstairs at that time and used to come up once a week to take the D/F class. We had a nickname for Dave which was "Roscoe" - ie he was the Emperor! Anyone who listened to pirate radio at the time will know where I'm coming from.

Other names I remember from my era - Tomo - one of the lecturers, Students - Geoff Streames (where are you now mate?), John Worman, Peter Game (Cyprus), Taff, Paddy, Leon, Robin Daz, Barbara Keating, Jim Barrie, Dick Poinder, Doug Hotchkiss (left for career on deck) and Pete Wilson-Smith - thats about all my memory can handle at the moment.

Was that restaurant - Spanish Pot - still open across the road?

Actually I can truly say that I completed the circle - I learnt morse there all those years ago, travelled the word and my last job in the world of communications was just down the road near the exhibition hall.

I visited the place about 10 years ago and it's still there - the front door still sounds the same when it slams shut behind you.

Very fond memories.

Steve.
 

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British School of Telegraphy

Hi there

Just read the forum messages and decided to post mine.

Was also at BST/LEC same time as Steve Chalkley and yes we had a whale of a time there. I can remember the old 19th century desks in the classroom and the in the morse room we had that old switchboard and tape machine to connect the desks. One other old lad to remember (unfortunatly postumously is Dick Skinner who was a good friend and colleague. He died of cancer some years back after serving many years with BP.

I will monitor the sight and see who else pops up

john (ex RO IMR)
 

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London Electronics College/British School of Telegraphy

I started at the LEC in September 1974 and left with MRGC and Radar Maintenance certificate. Joined P&O Cruises as a trainee R/O. I remember fellow students at the time as Alan Mackenzie, Alan Watson, Kim Thompson, Tony Gibson, Kevin Lamb, John Wood, Eric Shepherd, Steve Marshall, Steve Dunn, and a couple more I can't remember Paul? Tony? Dave Evans was in charge and Roger Pragnell was our main lecturer. Most of these guys seem to have gone completely off the radar so would be interested to hear where they ended up. Attached is a photo of us all standing on the steps of the LEC in Penywern Road in 1975.

Tony Clarke ex R/O with P&O, then BT Coast Stations, then back to sea as R/O with Marconi Offshore, OOCL and some freelance work.
 

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Wow! I thought I was still young - you guys have made me feel very, very old. I started at Penywern Rd when it was called "The London Telegraph Training College" or L.T.T.C, I commenced on 6th June 1944 (D-Day)on my 16th birthday, for the Special PMG cert - The permanent 1st and 2nd class PMG certs had been cancelled during wartime.

First ship to sea was the D.E.M.S "Clan Chisholm" as 3rd R/O. The war finished with Japan during the voyage homeward bound. We were ordered to dump all the ship's ammunition - we had a few hours practice at firing 4.7 shells and Bofor machine guns at imaginary targets!

Thanks for bringing back the memories . . .
 

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Thanks Ystradgynlais. You've made me feel even younger!!
Was at BST 1962/1963 for PMG 2.
Went to sea on the RMS Aragon as 3rd R/O then a whole bunch of ships with Siemens Bros/AEI/Marconi/IMR and it's various other names.
As I only left the sea about 18 months ago (sailing as Mate) and ticket says valid if more than 3 months at sea in previous 2 years, presume my ticket still valid. Though it wouldn't do me much good now.
While at BST resided at Civil Service hostel across the road and remember going to Dave's party for his first daughter held in the equipment room.
Anyone know where Dave ended up?
 

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I was at BST or LTTC as it was then called Sep 1959 to Dec 60 for my PMG2. It was a real pressure cooker place and I should have completed in August 60 but I managed to blow a couple of fuses in the AA during the practical and had to wait until Dec for a second shot. Our class pass rate was 9 out of 23 which was almost what old man Evans had predicted it would be on our first day in class , so pretty good compared to Norwood and other institutes.
 

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I was at LTTC as it was then called from Sep 59 to Dec 60 and left with a PMG2. should have completed the course in August 60 but I screwed the the AA on the practical part of the exam and had to wait until Dec 60 to complete the course. It was real pressure stuff and old man Evans told us on our first day that only 40% of the class at max would be successful. In my class of 23 only 9 of us completed so he was bang on with his projection.
 

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Any past inmates of this august institution out there? There must be some who still remember Penywern Road and still have their sanity intact? I'm thinking 1976-1978/9 or therabouts or indeed anyone who can confirm that the place wasn't a figment of my imagination....?

Martin (POP)
I was there during the 1950/s it was called The London Telegraph Training College , The Instructors were Mr Bell , real Gentlemean and ex Post Office Dollis Hill , Mr Ivor Savage who taught the Practical as well as Morse, The principal of the College at that time was Maurice Childs a Chartered Engineer. The Radio Equipment in the College at that time was Siemans Marine Equipment designed and built like a Brick Battleship, The Aviation Equipment was Marconi. There were two intakes of students one for the PMG Certificates and the 2nd one for The Flight Radio Officers Certificate. I believe that they were issued Civil Aviation Authority or Perhaps the Air Ministry . From Memory there were only two students for the latter course as Flight R/Os were becoming obsolete, both students qualified but I am not sure whether they ever got employment after they qualified.

The only Person I can remember from my days at the LTTC was Trevor Howard who hailed from Barnet , Six months into the PMG Course we both sat the City and Guilds Radio Amateur Certificate and were awarded with a pass.

I ended up with two PMG Certificates , there was a Shipping Slump at the time and qualified people had to wait one year to eighteen months to get a Ship. In the interim period of waiting I was lucky to be employed by LTTC teaching Morse and Rules and Regs . I can remember in desparation applying to the Falkland Islands as there were R/Os positions available there. I was shortlisted and did not hear anything back for over two years! by then I had already taken up employment,

Marconi, Siemans,IMR had waiting lists as long as your arm so I ended up going Free Lance with Niarchos Shipping , Jobs were so scarce that people in a job remained for long periods away without leave in case they had no job when they returned off leave , It was quite tough in those days but the remuneration was excellent , Marconi/Siemans/IMR rates of pay were about £26 a month all found whereas the Free Lance Employers the pay varied between £90 to £130 depending upon the Shipping Company. There were certainly benefits in working for a Radio Company ,whilst the pay may not have been so attractive at least you were guaranteed pay whether there was a ship available for you or not as the case may have been. With Free Lance work it was very much hit and miss and you could be laid off at a moments notice, thankfully that never happened to me.

Subsequently I worked Free Lance on Scandanavian Ships ,British Ships, Greek Ships , South African Ships until the demise of the Marine Radio Officer came along.

In latter years the LTTC was taken over by the British School of Wireless Telegraphy which were originally located down near Plaistow in London . They carried on the training for the PMGs and eventually the General Certificate and I believe that shortly afterwards they folded completely. Have I any regrets no , none at all , it was a marvellous time in Career advancement .
 

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I was there during the 1950/s it was called The London Telegraph Training College , The Instructors were Mr Bell , real Gentlemean and ex Post Office Dollis Hill , Mr Ivor Savage who taught the Practical as well as Morse, The principal of the College at that time was Maurice Childs a Chartered Engineer. The Radio Equipment in the College at that time was Siemans Marine Equipment designed and built like a Brick Battleship, The Aviation Equipment was Marconi. There were two intakes of students one for the PMG Certificates and the 2nd one for The Flight Radio Officers Certificate. I believe that they were issued Civil Aviation Authority or Perhaps the Air Ministry . From Memory there were only two students for the latter course as Flight R/Os were becoming obsolete, both students qualified but I am not sure whether they ever got employment after they qualified.

The only Person I can remember from my days at the LTTC was Trevor Howard who hailed from Barnet , Six months into the PMG Course we both sat the City and Guilds Radio Amateur Certificate and were awarded with a pass.

I ended up with two PMG Certificates , there was a Shipping Slump at the time and qualified people had to wait one year to eighteen months to get a Ship. In the interim period of waiting I was lucky to be employed by LTTC teaching Morse and Rules and Regs . I can remember in desparation applying to the Falkland Islands as there were R/Os positions available there. I was shortlisted and did not hear anything back for over two years! by then I had already taken up employment,

Marconi, Siemans,IMR had waiting lists as long as your arm so I ended up going Free Lance with Niarchos Shipping , Jobs were so scarce that people in a job remained for long periods away without leave in case they had no job when they returned off leave , It was quite tough in those days but the remuneration was excellent , Marconi/Siemans/IMR rates of pay were about £26 a month all found whereas the Free Lance Employers the pay varied between £90 to £130 depending upon the Shipping Company. There were certainly benefits in working for a Radio Company ,whilst the pay may not have been so attractive at least you were guaranteed pay whether there was a ship available for you or not as the case may have been. With Free Lance work it was very much hit and miss and you could be laid off at a moments notice, thankfully that never happened to me.

Subsequently I worked Free Lance on Scandanavian Ships ,British Ships, Greek Ships , South African Ships until the demise of the Marine Radio Officer came along.

In latter years the LTTC was taken over by the British School of Wireless Telegraphy which were originally located down near Plaistow in London . They carried on the training for the PMGs and eventually the General Certificate and I believe that shortly afterwards they folded completely. Have I any regrets no , none at all , it was a marvellous time in Career advancement .
I joined them in Sept 1959 in Plaistow and they moved to Penywern Street Earls Court in January 1960. I believe that they subsequently changed their name to LEC run by Joe evans and his son and they kept going into the seventies.
 
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