Ships Nostalgia banner
21 - 28 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Hi Alan,
I know this is a bit late to reply but I am researching the Crouch schooners for a possible DVD story & came across your comments. I need photos of any of them to complete this project. I have that port side view of Ian at anchor in HK. Would it be possible to get some from you please? I have completed two stories based on Annie Watt,One & All, Nelcebee & Falie using movie film. In the case of the Crouch boats it will have to be mainly stills as there is very little movie film of them. I have two photos of Claire loading in Port Pirie but they are shockers. Also have a few of her in her earlier life as Argosy Lemal.
Regards,
Rod Clarke
Hi Rod I am currently in hospital andwont be home till
september. I havecolourshots of both Claire and Jillian taken in Port Adelaide in1967 when they were undergoing survey
These include shots taken from cross trees.Go to Melbourne Herald Archives there are several shots of Argosy Lemal
Reggards
Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
Hi Rod I am currently in hospital andwont be home till
september. I havecolourshots of both Claire and Jillian taken in Port Adelaide in1967 when they were undergoing survey
These include shots taken from cross trees.Go to Melbourne Herald Archives there are several shots of Argosy Lemal
Reggards
Alan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hi Rod I am currently in hospital andwont be home till
september. I havecolourshots of both Claire and Jillian taken in Port Adelaide in1967 when they were undergoing survey
These include shots taken from cross trees.Go to Melbourne Herald Archives there are several shots of Argosy Lemal
Reggards
Alan
Hi Alan.Thanks for your quick response & sorry to hear about your hospitalisation. I will follow the lead to the Herald archives.
This project will take some time so can I get in touch again later in the year for a look at those photos? Do you still have that other Ian Crouch shot you mentioned?
Bet regards,
Rod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Wiki:
9 December 1958: Shackleton MR.1 VP254 of No. 205 Squadron RAF crashed into the South China Sea. All 10 on board killed.
As a 6 yr old child back in 1958, in a northern Ireland village - location of a wartime RAF Coastal Command airfield that much later was named the Shackleton Base when the British Army took it over in the 1970s - I remember once meeting a very young RAF air signaller called Peter Marshall on National Service from England. Shackletons regularly flew North Atlantic Cold War reconnaissance missions in those days, and were a familiar sight flying low over our small coastal village. Peter had just married Hester, a young woman raised in the village. Both must have been in their later teens at most. Soon afterwards Peter, of whom I have a fuzzy childhood memory as a slim, fair-haired, polite young man in His grey-blue RAF uniform, was posted overseas. Just before Christmas 1958, the village was shaken by the news that Hester’s husband Peter was among the air crew lost when the Shackleton aircraft he was on board, had utterly disappeared on a mission over the South China Sea. At the time nothing more was revealed to the wife’s family in N. Ireland - Cold War-era secrecy then being the norm - and my father, their local church minister, ran into a “cone of silence” when he tried to find out more from the RAF authorities on behalf of Peter’s widow, Hester, who soon afterwards gave birth to their only child, a daughter she named Lorna. Hester is long gone, but her daughter still lives in the local area, long married and now in her sixties. Over the decades, now long resident in Pacific Canada, I have often thought of Peter, Hester and Lorna, and wondered what really happened to him. In recent days I’ve stumbled on the online mentions of the December 1958 Shackleton tragic loss, with all her 10 young crew, and the concurrent unsuccessful search off N. Borneo for the missing auxiliary cargo schooner, the Ian Crouch. This website chain has been a revelation too. I gather from one of the comments that a body of a crew member was recovered from the ocean. Online I have just found mention of a memorial to that lost Shackleton crew, including Peter, in a small English church. I’m feeling saddened but appreciative of finding out answers to at least some of the questions that I’ve had in my mind for these past sixty-plus years. Per Ardua Ad Astra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
As a 6 yr old child back in 1958, in a northern Ireland village - location of a wartime RAF Coastal Command airfield that much later was named the Shackleton Base when the British Army took it over in the 1970s - I remember once meeting a very young RAF air signaller called Peter Marshall on National Service from England. Shackletons regularly flew North Atlantic Cold War reconnaissance missions in those days, and were a familiar sight flying low over our small coastal village. Peter had just married Hester, a young woman raised in the village. Both must have been in their later teens at most. Soon afterwards Peter, of whom I have a fuzzy childhood memory as a slim, fair-haired, polite young man in His grey-blue RAF uniform, was posted overseas. Just before Christmas 1958, the village was shaken by the news that Hester’s husband Peter was among the air crew lost when the Shackleton aircraft he was on board, had utterly disappeared on a mission over the South China Sea. At the time nothing more was revealed to the wife’s family in N. Ireland - Cold War-era secrecy then being the norm - and my father, their local church minister, ran into a “cone of silence” when he tried to find out more from the RAF authorities on behalf of Peter’s widow, Hester, who soon afterwards gave birth to their only child, a daughter she named Lorna. Hester is long gone, but her daughter still lives in the local area, long married and now in her sixties. Over the decades, now long resident in Pacific Canada, I have often thought of Peter, Hester and Lorna, and wondered what really happened to him. In recent days I’ve stumbled on the online mentions of the December 1958 Shackleton tragic loss, with all her 10 young crew, and the concurrent unsuccessful search off N. Borneo for the missing auxiliary cargo schooner, the Ian Crouch. This website chain has been a revelation too. I gather from one of the comments that a body of a crew member was recovered from the ocean. Online I have just found mention of a memorial to that lost Shackleton crew, including Peter, in a small English church. I’m feeling saddened but appreciative of finding out answers to at least some of the questions that I’ve had in my mind for these past sixty-plus years. Per Ardua Ad Astra.
Interesting. Thanks for the comment. Long forgotten actions that are still puzzling those left to ponder on another of the sea's great mysteries. The truth may be locked away in secret London
files & the minds of the Chinese "fishermen" who saw the plane go down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Interesting. Thanks for the comment. Long forgotten actions that are still puzzling those left to ponder on another of the sea's great mysteries. The truth may be locked away in secret London
files & the minds of the Chinese "fishermen" who saw the plane go down.
Hi Rod,
Thanks for your comments. The atoll where the only body from the lost aircrew that was recovered was first buried by a local fisherman. In fact he did give an account later of being the sole witness from his boat to Shackleton VP254 from 205 Sqdrn (Singapore) crash headling into the ocean near the atoll, and memorizing the plane’s 205 number on the fuselage before it sank below the waves. No sign of any human activity so the 10-strong crew (plus one civilian, a local Labuan-based senior police officer) may well all have been killed on impact. The Anglican parish church of St. Eval, Cornwall, produced a fascinating booklet of some six or seven pages in 2008 about the lost Shackleton to commemorate the 50th anniversary, when a service was held there which some family members (including Flt. Sgt. Peter Marshall from Nottingham’s sister) attended. Mention is made of how little was done by the Air Force authorities at the time (1958) to communicate with bereaved family members or to connect them with each other. Virtually none had never met up until the 2008 service in the church Cornwall, closely acvinexted with the former RAF Coastal Command airbase there (long since closed, just like the CC sister base Ballykelly, NI). I’ll post the link for downloading that fascinating pamphlet which contains S various contemporary Straits Times clippings about the tragic incident. Truth being often stranger than fiction. Peter’s daughter Lorna is now on her early sixties, I gather, still residing near her village birthplace in Co Derry, NI. The owner of a privately-run Royal Air Force museum association in the village tells me she is a paid-up member and has donated copies of some old photos of her dad (whom of course she never met) with Shackletons that he flew in. I’m hoping to visit the museum next year if travel from Canada to UK is feasible (I’m now among the double-vaccinated of course) and see those. Li Link for downloadable pamphlet about VP254 is second one below. Cheers.


Story of the Cross

RAF Connections
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Hi Rod,
Thanks for your comments. The atoll where the only body from the lost aircrew that was recovered was first buried by a local fisherman. In fact he did give an account later of being the sole witness from his boat to Shackleton VP254 from 205 Sqdrn (Singapore) crash headling into the ocean near the atoll, and memorizing the plane’s 205 number on the fuselage before it sank below the waves. No sign of any human activity so the 10-strong crew (plus one civilian, a local Labuan-based senior police officer) may well all have been killed on impact. The Anglican parish church of St. Eval, Cornwall, produced a fascinating booklet of some six or seven pages in 2008 about the lost Shackleton to commemorate the 50th anniversary, when a service was held there which some family members (including Flt. Sgt. Peter Marshall from Nottingham’s sister) attended. Mention is made of how little was done by the Air Force authorities at the time (1958) to communicate with bereaved family members or to connect them with each other. Virtually none had never met up until the 2008 service in the church Cornwall, closely acvinexted with the former RAF Coastal Command airbase there (long since closed, just like the CC sister base Ballykelly, NI). I’ll post the link for downloading that fascinating pamphlet which contains S various contemporary Straits Times clippings about the tragic incident. Truth being often stranger than fiction. Peter’s daughter Lorna is now on her early sixties, I gather, still residing near her village birthplace in Co Derry, NI. The owner of a privately-run Royal Air Force museum association in the village tells me she is a paid-up member and has donated copies of some old photos of her dad (whom of course she never met) with Shackletons that he flew in. I’m hoping to visit the museum next year if travel from Canada to UK is feasible (I’m now among the double-vaccinated of course) and see those. Li Link for downloadable pamphlet about VP254 is second one below. Cheers.


Story of the Cross

RAF Connections
Thanks Joe for these fascinating clips. Just reading the Wikipedia article on the ownership of Itu Aba is bewildering to say the least. None of those newspaper cuttings (story of the cross) seems to mention the helicopter men who were landed on the island from an aircraft carrier, to investigate. I watched a great talk by one of the retired crew landed there trying to explain what they found & saw. None of this really gets to explaining the cause of the Shackleton crash, where it is, or the mystery of Ian crouch. Secrets of the seas! Lovely that those families were able to get together to commemorate the loss of their families....which usually requires a great effort by families against the sluggish authorities. I am talking to decendents of the captains of the Crouch schooners who offer me photos & log book pages of their life in these little ships. History must not be thrown into the bin of passing years.
I hope you do get to visit the museum but I worry about the state of the world & future international travel. My wife & I are fully vaccinated too & love our travel but flights coming in to Australia are causing mayhem with infected air crew & passengers.The new variant is going wild with no one able to control it. C'est la Vie......
Cheers, Rod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Thanks Joe for these fascinating clips. Just reading the Wikipedia article on the ownership of Itu Aba is bewildering to say the least. None of those newspaper cuttings (story of the cross) seems to mention the helicopter men who were landed on the island from an aircraft carrier, to investigate. I watched a great talk by one of the retired crew landed there trying to explain what they found & saw. None of this really gets to explaining the cause of the Shackleton crash, where it is, or the mystery of Ian crouch. Secrets of the seas! Lovely that those families were able to get together to commemorate the loss of their families....which usually requires a great effort by families against the sluggish authorities. I am talking to decendents of the captains of the Crouch schooners who offer me photos & log book pages of their life in these little ships. History must not be thrown into the bin of passing years.
I hope you do get to visit the museum but I worry about the state of the world & future international travel. My wife & I are fully vaccinated too & love our travel but flights coming in to Australia are causing mayhem with infected air crew & passengers.The new variant is going wild with no one able to control it. C'est la Vie......
Cheers, Rod
I do wonder about that helicopter landing omission from the church leaflet too, Rod - perhaps they just didn’t know about it. I think their clippings came from a family member of of one of the lost Shackleton crew who researched the local news reports out there. Maybe the Kew PRO in London which I gather has all the official RAF records now from that era, has done answers. Don’t know when I’ll be back there - as you say, the new Covid variants and the low rate of vax among the younger generation (who remember nothing about the terrible real fear of polio and smallpox) give one pause over long distance travelling. If I find out any more, I’ll post you another message. Haven’t viewed that Spratlys YouTube video yet, eating for a quiet moment to do that. Cheers.
 
21 - 28 of 28 Posts
Top