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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Shell tanker HALIA is seen above in the Mersey soon after leaving the entrance to the Manchester Ship Canal at Eastham. The two black cylindrical objects on the port side are rubber fenders used during 'lightening' work when cargo was transferred from larger tankers in Lyme Bay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The Halia

Fairfield said:
:lol: A favourite at Ardrossan where she used to come regularly.Fond memories of her.Have some shots and must dig them out and post them.
Boy, when I was a kid in Glasgow Ardrossan was one of the holiday resorts. I guess everybody goes to Spain these days and all these great ol' Scottish resorts must be pretty depressed. Used to have good time at Ardrossan, Wemyss Bay, Largs, Ayr, Dunoon, Helensburgh etc. etc. Only problem was the weather, of course!!! Many times walking along the sea front in pouring rain and trying to play 'pitch put'!!!
Ian (Admin).
 

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Halia

I was an apprentice at Hawthorn Leslie, Hebburn when the Halia was built and deliverd in 1958. She remained in the Shell fleet until she was scrapped in 1985. The last survivor of the 30 "H" Class. Amazingly her final commander was Captain Fred Coxon, who had been one of her crew members when she was delivered to Shell 27 years earlier.

Fred
 

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Hyalina

To Oldbosun

No. The 18,000 dwt Helicina (1946) and Hyalina (1948) were a pair of experimental 16 knot turbo-electric powered tankers built by Swan Hunter at the time when Shell was absorbing its 19 American T2s. Halia was one of the 30 strong H class delivered by Cammell Laird (5), Smiths Dock (5), Hawthorn Leslie (4), Swan Hunter (4), Lithgows (4), Vickers (3), Harland & Wolff (3), J L Thompson (1) and Odense (1) from 1953 to 1957. Other units were built in Holland for Royal Dutch as their K Class. Although the H class were also 18,000 dwt, they had a different hull form to Helicina and all bar 2 were steam turbine, with a speed of about 14.5 knots.

Regards

Fred
 

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Hyalina

Thanks for the info re Hyalina Fred. I sailed AB in her early 50s

We knew she was a 'fast' ship. (For a tanker, for the day) We knew "Helecina" was her sister, but never heard of all those other "H" class ships.
We also thought she was quite big too. Then when I was in Curacao on Shell's "Patella" (Asphalt to Perth Amboy, New Jersey, back and forth to Curacao) Along came Shell's "Velutina" 28,000 tons. We thought she was an absolute monster, not realizing that here was the writing on the wall.
I guess us simple seamen didn't realise it then. We didn't look ahead for change. Our perfect world was never going to end was it. But it did come crashing down. Half a million ton tankers and container ships.....Ugh! (Cloud)
 

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my first ship as a deck apprentice in 1965. joined in Stanlow, coastal and northern europe, one trip to Curacao and back, drydock in Cardiff, then mediterranean, round to the Gulf,Abadan to Singapore.we did a couple of trips to Saigon and paid off after six and a half months. hard up, happy days!
 

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Halia

Went aboard the Halia a couple of times in the early 1960s when she was in port with the San Florentino. Whenever people came back aboard the San Florentino from the Halia (or other Shell 'H' boats) they always commented on how much better our accommodation was than theirs. Clearly people thought that Eagle Oil's quality and interpretation of an 18,000 dwt tanker was far ahead of Shell's. Perhaps that is why Shell Tankers survived and Eagle Oil was swallowed up.

Ron Stringer
 
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