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First of two ore carrier ordered from William Grey,by Ore Carriers ltd ,Manager
Houlder Bros.11632 g,t.doxford diesel by C.M.E.,5500 b.h.p. 13 knots.(old pic collect.)
 

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tanker said:
First of two ore carrier ordered from William Grey,by Ore Carriers ltd ,Manager
Houlder Bros.11632 g,t.doxford diesel by C.M.E.,5500 b.h.p. 13 knots.(old pic collect.)
Great to see a photo of my first cargo ship - sailed on her in 1969. Judging by the tug, Erimus Cross, she is sailing from my home town Middlesbrough, where I joined her. Maybe this was my trip! Thanks "Tanker".

She was one of about 100 ships from numerous companies on BISCO (British Iron and Steel Co) charters. Iron ore loaded in ports from Vitoria to Murmansk and from Monrovia to Sept Isles was discharged in steel producing ports all round the UK.

In the mid-70s, the rationalisation of the steel industry and the introduction of the large bulk carriers led to the closure of many of the ports and the demise of the small bulkers in the iron ore trade.

Sadly, Captain Boothby, Master of Mabel Warwick during my time, was killed soon afterwards in the disastrous fire on Houlder's Royston Grange when she collided with a tanker in the River Plate.

John.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well john, after a lot of years an Italian enthusiast of merchant ships remember you, the first your ship M.Warwick.I am happy!!!
Gp (Wave)
 

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I sailed in JOYA MCCANCE, sister ship to MABEL WARWICK in 1962, had a great time despite awful run to West Africa (Pepel & Conakry) and once across to Seven Islands, Canada. That would not have been so bad but it was fog all the way and horn going every few minutes, then loaded 15,000 tons in less than two hours and back to sea again where we returned to newport and layup. I went to an Everard's Yellow Peril after that and had an even better time.
 

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trotterdotpom said:
Great to see a photo of my first cargo ship - sailed on her in 1969. Judging by the tug, Erimus Cross, she is sailing from my home town Middlesbrough, where I joined her. Maybe this was my trip! Thanks "Tanker".

She was one of about 100 ships from numerous companies on BISCO (British Iron and Steel Co) charters. Iron ore loaded in ports from Vitoria to Murmansk and from Monrovia to Sept Isles was discharged in steel producing ports all round the UK.

In the mid-70s, the rationalisation of the steel industry and the introduction of the large bulk carriers led to the closure of many of the ports and the demise of the small bulkers in the iron ore trade.

Sadly, Captain Boothby, Master of Mabel Warwick during my time, was killed soon afterwards in the disastrous fire on Houlder's Royston Grange when she collided with a tanker in the River Plate.

John.
John, I joined her in 1970 - all of your comments are extremely accurate.

I remember her as a lovely ship, one of the happiest I sailed on, and Captain Boothby was a true gentleman, very much missed.

Tonga
 

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The Joya McCance became the ST. Margaret and continued the BISCO charter, my first ship in 1968 Middlesboro to Monrovia with Paddy Slevin. She was also my first ship as 2nd Mate in 1973. She would roll on wet grass. Remember leaving Glasgow New Years Eve '73 for Seven Islands and loading in 35 minutes, good news it was -40!!
 

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Saw both those ships on the slip being built in Grays yard as I stayed there when on leave sometimes in those days and also spent some time on the Baltic timber run to Union dock Hartlepools so we passed through the Middle dock . Hartlepools was a very busy small port, they were also building for Livarnos in those times,pity those times never stayed with the UK
 

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chadders said:
The Joya McCance became the ST. Margaret and continued the BISCO charter, my first ship in 1968 Middlesboro to Monrovia with Paddy Slevin. She was also my first ship as 2nd Mate in 1973. She would roll on wet grass. Remember leaving Glasgow New Years Eve '73 for Seven Islands and loading in 35 minutes, good news it was -40!!
Ah yes.. and Paddy Slevin was an interesting man, very kind and hugely able in his own way and if I remember him well, tee-total during his time on board, but not so once en-route back home in his own time, which journey usualy took some time. - Having checked my records I can see I was on board the St Margaret in 1968 and the sister ship, in 1970.
 

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Tonga, your posting on Paddy Slevin made me laugh and brought back wonderful memories. I sailed with him when he was C/O on the Imperial Transport under Capt.Valentine. We became firm friends and in those days we lived less than 100 miles apart in N.I. On a couple of occasions we travelled over there together or at least we started out together! He usually fell foul of the evil booze not long after leaving the ship and, like you said, his trip took some considerable time. I learnt from his sister that on one occasion he did not make it at all! Was very fond of him.
 

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The Joya McCance became the ST. Margaret and continued the BISCO charter, my first ship in 1968 Middlesboro to Monrovia with Paddy Slevin. She was also my first ship as 2nd Mate in 1973. She would roll on wet grass. Remember leaving Glasgow New Years Eve '73 for Seven Islands and loading in 35 minutes, good news it was -40!!

Looking back I found this one - I reckon the 35 minutes would definitely be a record.

ps. In case anyone is wondering, I have just moved all the recent general comments to the main Houlders Ore Carriers Thread, in keeping with scheme of things and the fact they were all about several of the Ore Boats and I will also copy this one across to provide some continuity.
 

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It must have been 1973 or 74 when I was on the MW. We lost a crew member overboard in Vitoria, Brazil. A really nice guy who worked in the engine room. I think he was called Alex, a Geordie who had served in the war feeding German POWs at Haltwhistle. He had a passion for hating Germans. He was buried at a site near the port at a ceremony attended by all of us from the MW.
 

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Joined her prior to her sea trials. Capt.Neil was the master and second time I sailed with him. I think the Orelia was the other vessel. Nice guy. I eventually fell off the funnel while in Conakry. I landed on the thermotank unit on my feet and wore a pair of plaster of paris trousers for six months. The things that happen!!!
 

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Actually, I didn't bounce at all! Broke every metatarsal in both feet as well as a few other bones and for good measure broke both legs, one of them in two places. The elderly French doc., in Conakry x-rayed me with a relic of the past that looked like an iron standard lamp. He then anmounced that I was badly bruised and gave me a crepe bandage. Chippy made me crurches out of broom handles and I spent the trip home not only in agony but gainfully employed painting all the lifebelts in my cabin. Newcastle Royal Infirmary put things into perspective. Not sure if my memory serves me correctly, possibly not, but the mate may have been Jimmy Whitley. Whoever it was, together with old "Granny" Neil, they looked after me well. I can't remember what befell the guy on the other end of the painting stage. I believe he ended up hanging off the monkey island with a bad headache!
 

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No need to be embarrassed at all. I dine out frequently on the event. I seem to have made a habit of falling off things - white leading the forestay of the mainmast on the Imperial Transport when the hitch on the bosun's chair came undone. Fell flat on my face on the flying bridge in front of the old man who was covered from head to foot in white lead. Fell of a stage on the Orelia in La Goulette while painting the starboard name. In my attempt to save myself primarily, and secondly, to save the yellow paint from spraying all over the black hull, I got a one inch splinter of rotten wood into a finger. Having emerged dripping from the sea, Ch.Steward Reagan pulled it out but left the poison in. Two days later it was red hot and the size of a balloon. Old man Neil lanced it and I disappeared at the end of the trip into Neath General hospital with blood poisoning. I'm still around and laughing about it. Sometimes I feel I could write a book but who the hell would read it??!!
 

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Looks like we were on board together in Vitoria, Brasil, I knew Alex well, down in the engine room, will never forget when he jumped overboard I was drinking a beer with him at the time.
I was the R/O, Tom.
 

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What a wonderful place Vitoria was, went there on the Orotava, was rather too big a vessel and the loading arm would not fully span the hatch, ended up sitting on the bottom, waited several days for a high tide to float us and then went down to Tubarao, finished loading in a matter of hours then off to Kure Japan. But had a wonderful extended stay in Vitoria.
 

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Those two ships appear to have been very popular, I sailed in the MABEL WARWICK for 5 months in 68/69. Most memorable trip was with "Dixie" Dean, another fine gentleman, sadly now deceased, we arrived in Seven Islands on Boxing Day 68, the Chief asked if he could shut the Aux. Boiler down for an hour, Capt. Dean said OK, but make it quick. Not quick enough, everything froze up solid. All the deck crew crowded into one cabin, and other depts the same, trying to keep warm. The showers froze, the valves smashed, the toilets froze, pipes split everywhere. We had to get a gang of French Canadians out to help unfreeze the ship. Can't remember the temperature, but it was bl***y cold. After loadind, on the way back to Newport, we found water in the holds, Capt.White attended in Newport, we did a hose test on the hatch lids, he needed oilskins on standing in the holds.
 
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