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My sister worked with a girl whose father worked for McAndrews on deck running into Seaforth in the 70's. I think his surname was Musson.
 

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Ellerman & Papayanni Line

As I remember some of the small City boats were also swapped between the MacAndrew's trades and what was left of Ellerman Lines (also owned by Weirs).
The Ellerman & Papayanni Line Lucian sailed regularly from the old London Dock on the Oporto run in 1963/’64 whilst we in the MacAndrews Pozarica ran to Lisbon from the same Dock.

Keith
 

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The Ellerman Pappayanni (Happy Paps !) Market Boats
LUCIAN CROSBIAN PALMELIAN MERCIAN in the early 60s usually ran Liverpool (or London) to Lisbon, Oporto and Leixoes on a 2 week turn-around.
Rough-ride on those vessels outward-bound through the Bay, but usually a lot smoother on the way back.
Happy Days !
Roger
 

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Currie Line

I should have mentioned Lisbon as a main port of call for the Lucian. The early 60s also saw Currie Line’s Scotland and England sail from the old London Dock on short-sea routes – can’t recall which ports, though.

Keith
 

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Pozerica

Sorry to intrude, but seeing reference to the POZERICA rang a bell in my mind. Late 50's when on leave from the Bank Line and living in the London suburbs, I cycled down to London docks and shared a beer or two with the mate of (I believe) the Pozerica late at night. The only thing is she was then loading for Baltic ports for UBC, and I wonder if you or any viewers can confirm that this indeed took place? Did UBC occasionally use McAndrews vessels and vice versa?
Thanks
Here she is
 

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The Bosun and Carpenter on "Pinto" lived on the ship.
Theo, the Bosun, was from Poland and the Carpenter (Forgot
his name) was from the Maldive Islands.
Their only address was a c/o a Seaman's home in Liverpool.

Alan’s picture of the Pozarica brings to mind the Poles we had on deck in that ship; the Bosun and three ABs. These East Europeans understandably retained wartime memories – the ABs had reservations about the Bosun, claiming his Russian was rather better than his Polish. The elderly Estonian Carpenter would have truck with none of them, preferring to eat alone in his cabin rather than share a table.

One quiet Sunday forenoon with the ship shut down and alongside the North Quay, a terrible screaming sound arose from a lower alleyway. As the only Mate on board the Londoners having gone home, and fearing the worst, I rushed below to find Chippy, a man wedded to the vodka, in the throes of a howling attack of DTs. A few of us stayed close until he quietened down but sadly he was paid off the next day to face an uncertain future.

A typical part Crew List from the GSNC Heron is attached.

Keith
 

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Sailed with a Polish cook in ubc by the name of Joe - cannot remember his surname - he had his Nazi concentration camp id number tattooed on his arm, probably passed on by now.

Mike
 

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Ref Alan's note about turn arounds, nothing to do with MacAndrews. I was in a Bank boat, think it was Testbank, in Bs.As. when I met an old schoolmate "up the road". He was in Royal Mail's "Drina". We had nearly finished discharge and were about to go up river when I met him again. When we sailed, loaded from Rosario and Bs.As., who should come up the river from Recalada? Drina. She did two and a half round trips while we were in the Plate. Good times.(Thumb)
 

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What was the typical round trip time in McAndrews?!
The Liverpool ships "Pinto" and "Velarde" in the early 1960's had a round trip of 6 weeks, two weeks in Liverpool and four weeks away to the ports that
cruise passengers now spend thousands to visit.

As we were on a "Running agreement" the time in Liverpool counted as full sea time even though we may have gone home for a few days!!

"Too good to be true", yes it was!!
 

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The Liverpool ships "Pinto" and "Velarde" in the early 1960's had a round trip of 6 weeks, two weeks in Liverpool and four weeks away to the ports that
cruise passengers now spend thousands to visit.

As we were on a "Running agreement" the time in Liverpool counted as full sea time even though we may have gone home for a few days!!

"Too good to be true", yes it was!!
The Vives was on a similar run although we only had a week in Liverpool, during which we had to work by but could go home at 5.00 and return at 08.00 just like regular commuters. I enjoyed that.(Thumb)
 

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On "Pinto" we would go first to the South End Docks to discharge
Onions, Oranges,from Spain and Tinned Tomates from Italy.
This took the first week and then we moved down to Canada Dock SW3 to load general cargo outward.
Occasionally the load would not be completed by Friday so we got a third weekend in Liverpool.
 

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On "Pinto" we would go first to the South End Docks to discharge
Onions, Oranges,from Spain and Tinned Tomates from Italy.
This took the first week and then we moved down to Canada Dock SW3 to load general cargo outward.
Occasionally the load would not be completed by Friday so we got a third weekend in Liverpool.
Much the same on Vives. We discharged in Queens Dock, then shifted to Bramley Moore to load.
The captain on Vives was a martyr to sea sickness and spent much of his time "calling for Hughie" over the lee side, as I did, on that seagoing roller coaster.(EEK)
 

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lucky so n so's

The Liverpool ships "Pinto" and "Velarde" in the early 1960's had a round trip of 6 weeks, two weeks in Liverpool and four weeks away to the ports that
cruise passengers now spend thousands to visit.

As we were on a "Running agreement" the time in Liverpool counted as full sea time even though we may have gone home for a few days!!

"Too good to be true", yes it was!!
To think we got excited if joining a Bank Line ship on the copra run with the prospect of 6 months away, down to Australian or N.Z. ports from the US Gulf, and back through the islands with copra, more often than not to Bromboro dock. Thought we had won the jackpot, although some of us sad cases liked the idea of a full 2 years away!
 

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When I was on the Vives outward we only went to Genoa and Leghorn where we fully discharged and a little back loading, homeward we went to many Spanish ports the main ones were Valencia and Malaga. We also called at a number of minor ports, one where we berthed with about twenty carts drawn by donkeys waiting with oranges to be loaded, I think it was a dream now, as it's difficult to believe it, due to now everything has to be done yesterday.
We used to berth in Carriers dock to discharge then move to the Queens to load as Pat said we used to work by with a job and finish soogieng the funnel on Saturday morning. Can't recall the Old mans name but he was from Somerset, the mate from Belfast, 2nd mate was from Pakistan, bosun was Gerry Lasaga, she was a good job but the tiller instead of a wheel was a pain.
 

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"Pinto"'s outward ports were Savona, Genoa, Livorno, & Naples every trip and occasionaly Palermo and Catania in Sicily.
We used to load an unbelievable ammount of tinned tomatoes in Naples then to all the Spanish Mediterranean ports to load.
We only did one trip to Cadiz and Seville when the Bitter (Marmalade) Oranges were harvested.

on "Ponzano" we did the Spanish "Biscay" ports, Bilbao, Santander, Pesajes, then down to Cassablanca and Kenitra
then Seville and Cadiz homeward. A round trip of 4 weeks.
 

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Sailed with a Polish cook in ubc by the name of Joe - cannot remember his surname - he had his Nazi concentration camp id number tattooed on his arm, probably passed on by now.

Mike
sailed with joe the polish cook on baltic valiant mid 70s i was 4/e he was a good baker used to make his own bread ( colin)
 

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Much the same on Vives. We discharged in Queens Dock, then shifted to Bramley Moore to load.
The captain on Vives was a martyr to sea sickness and spent much of his time "calling for Hughie" over the lee side, as I did, on that seagoing roller coaster.(EEK)
I had my finest moment on the Vives, when crossing Biscay one dark and stormy night.
She was doing her customary somersaults while I was on look out on the monkey island.
On spotting a light through the murk, I lifted the lid of the voicepipe to report it to the wheelhouse, just as my stomach gave up, and I threw up neatly and precisely into the open voicepipe.
My dinner hit the helmsman squarely in his upturned face. (EEK)(EEK)
 

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sailed with joe the polish cook on baltic valiant mid 70s i was 4/e he was a good baker used to make his own bread ( colin)
Yep that's him, don't think it was the Valiant then. Looking at disch book it may have been the Jet. Vague memories of chatting to him in the galley seem to have the galley situated on one side of the ship as opposed to the center line.
Not that it is important of course !

Mike
 

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I had my finest moment on the Vives, when crossing Biscay one dark and stormy night.
She was doing her customary somersaults while I was on look out on the monkey island.
On spotting a light through the murk, I lifted the lid of the voicepipe to report it to the wheelhouse, just as my stomach gave up, and I threw up neatly and precisely into the open voicepipe.
My dinner hit the helmsman squarely in his upturned face. (EEK)(EEK)
I sailed with a Mate in Bank Line who suffered badly from sea sickness even in fairly moderate seas.
The same man also became easily inebriated – a “sniff of the barmaid’s apron” sufficed.
I don’t know whether or not these two afflictions were connected. (Jester)

Keith
 
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