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Discussion Starter #1
Good day All
Can anyone help me with a muster roll "Maria Soames" convict ship that ended up in Mauritius after a hurricane and then towed to a port in the Cape Colony about 1846.

https://books.google.co.za/books?id...ECAoQAQ#v=onepage&q=maria soames ship&f=false

I am looking specifically for an Edward Cavanagh who was on this ship and wondered what position he held as he was not a convict.
Thanking you in advance.
Trixie
 

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Sorry I can't help but I recommend that the book This Fatal Shore will give readers an insight to the horrors of transportation,maybe the researchers of this book can help you.
 

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Hello and welcome,
MARIA SOMES This is the spelling in Lloyds Register and the Mercantile navy List was registered in London UK. She was owned by J Somes. Built at Yarmouth in 1841 a Barque of 786 GRT. Her Captains name is given as Baker.
If they have survived, her Crew Agreements and Logbooks for 1846 Should be in the British National Archive. http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C4065373
These should tell you all the Crew onboard.
According to contempory newspapers reports, MARIA SOMES was transporting Troops, not convicts. (The 90th Regiment, under the command of Captain Mann, returning from Ceylon) Their names will not be recorded in the Logbook or Crew Agreement. I can find nothing in Army records at TNA.

regards
Roger
 

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Hi Roger
Much appreciated - okay that makes sense as he became a gaoler once he was on land and another person who I am looking for was also on similar ship who was shipwrecked.
kind thanks
Heather
 

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MARIA SOMES’[1st voyage] Built 1841 at Yarmouth. Wood barque of 786 Tons. She carried 264 male convicts to Hobart and had two deaths en-route. She departed London on the 25th of April 1844 and arrived at Hobart on the 30th of July 1844. Master: Captain John Baker. Surgeon: J. Osborne.

comprehensive history as below;

https://www.shipindex.org/ships/maria_somes - subscribe.

the JOSEPH SOMES (same owner) built 1845, made two voyages carrying male convicts otherwise they were 'British EastIndiamen' - troops and general traders.
 

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MARIA SOMES’[1st voyage] Built 1841 at Yarmouth. Wood barque of 786 Tons. She carried 264 male convicts to Hobart and had two deaths en-route. She departed London on the 25th of April 1844 and arrived at Hobart on the 30th of July 1844. Master: Captain John Baker. Surgeon: J. Osborne.

comprehensive history as below;

https://www.shipindex.org/ships/maria_somes - subscribe.

the JOSEPH SOMES (same owner) built 1845, made two voyages carrying male convicts otherwise they were 'British EastIndiamen' - troops and general traders.
thanks so much indeed
much appreciated
 

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thanks so much indeed
much appreciated
Deary me verneukpan, that was some trip your relation made back then.

full record of diaster as below;

https://sites.rootsweb.com/~pbtyc/Gazette/Misc/Maria_Somes.html - Dreadful Gale Encountered by the Maria Somes

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/683037 - typical as reported in Australian newspapers

After surviving the tempest off Mauritius the Maria Somers was towed by the tug HMS Thunderbolt to Port Elizabeth. HMS Thunderbolt (1842) was a wooden paddle sloop launched in 1842 and wrecked off South Africa in 1847.
In April 1846 part of this regiment is detained at Capetown (see below) when on their way home from Ceylon via Port Elizabeth, and in July of the same year the remainder is detained at Port Elizabeth where the Maria Somers is undergoing repair. In January 1848 Maria Somers finally leaves for England.

The Military's instructions;
“Before leaving Capetown he gave instructions that if any
troops should happen to call they were to be detained and
sent to the frontier with all possible speed. On the 3rd of
April the transport Mariner, from Colombo bound to
Portsmouth, put into Simon's Bay for refreshment. She
had on board nine officers and two hundred and eighty-three
rank and file of the 90th regiment, who were immediately
forwarded to the front. Every effective soldier was sent up
from Capetown, a volunteer guard taking their place at the
castle and forts".

https://www.spink.com/lot/18002000229 - The 90th (Perthshire Volunteers)

That's a voyage your relation wouldn't forget and as likely as not, a nightmare for the troops and their families thinking they had been on a 'homeward bounder'.
 

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