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Ahoy,

I don't want to forget our "Iberian crew members",as they came in the Dutch MN in the early '50's, and I've served them a lot of:

Feijoada[black beans and pork stew]
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Cozido's[different meat dish]
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Bacalhau à Portuguesa[codfish fish dish]
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Caldeirada à Fragateira[different fish dish]

And still make them nowadays, for friends. You just have to try it once!!!
 

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Best feeders in BP were in my opinion the Indian crew ships. The tables (not just on these ships) were always properly laid, silver napkin rings etc. and for every meal starting with breakfast the Chief Steward had prepared a menu typed on the Company Menu card. Full English breakfast with juices, egg choice, hot cakes followed at midday by, you guessed it, a curry (Kopta, Madras, Dahl.....) with trimmings or/and English Fayre finishing off with dessert and cheeses. And if that wasn't enough an omelette for tea @ 17:00? No problem. To imagine I sacrificed all this for cereals and hard-boiled eggs, gristle with Sauerkraut and Rote Grütze followed at teatime by yes, black or grey bread and sliced sausage. German Merchant Marine Fayre A.D. 1978. Mind you, some of the Stewardesses weren't bad. ;-))
 

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Hi Folks,
When I sailed with Blue Star Lines the Food was fairly good when we had passengers aboard,but when in port it went downhill,nobody ate aboard. We used to have a salad called Russian Salad,no wonder Russia was such a happy country, During the voyage they would have on the menu a dish called colonial goose,it was always legs,we called it Blue Star centipede? They never gave you fresh milk but watered down condensed milk--yuk!
Cheers,
Neil Mac.
 

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The list that was displayed on board ships was a copy of the ships agreement (articles) and that showed the minimum (chief stewards thought it was maximum) food allowances with permitted substitutes. Commanly know as your wack.
Not many went to these extremes but I all depended on whither the chief steward had enough saved to buy his retirement pub
 

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The Nautical Cookery Book

John Cassels said:
Anyone ever heard of the book I mentioned in my introduction and if so where
I can get hold of a copy ?.

JC

Here you are John - 2nd hand at £12.50 from www.abebooks.co.uk

The Nautical Cookery Book - for the Use of Stewards & Cooks of Cargo Vessels
C H Atkinson

but I see it/was (ISBN: 0851741916) a title from - Brown, Son & Ferguson - the famous nautical publisher's - so maybe worth getting in touch with them in Glasgow ....

(red text is direct links)


b.rdgs


ps I'll expect an invite - Nasi Goreng with peanut sauce was always nice :)
 

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DMA said:
What about Currie & Rice at breakfast that of course after around of eggs & bacon.
This was Harrisons [ two of fat one of lean Harrisons ],who said they were hungry.
Have had me hooked on currie ever since. (Thumb)
hi dave you forgot the griddle cakes and syrup my favourite cheers lofty
 

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In Brocklebank we had a coasting chief who always came into the duty mess at lunch time, "Boy, let me see the menu" Chief-"Nothing I fancy, just send some rolls and butter to my cabin"
Behind his back we engineers and the mess boy were silently mimicing the same words as he had ordered the same every lunch time!
Mind you it was nothing for us growing boys(then!) to go through the whole menu, soup, curry(every day of course), main course, sweet, cheese and biscuits etc etc

We had a 2nd eng,. who ordered eggs at breakfast, "Mess boy- how you want your eggs sahib?"
2nd- "Not too soft, but not too hard, but just right"
Mess boy- " Acha sahib"
Needless to say he got them the same each day!
 

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"They" used to say in Brocklebanks that you got a Sunday Dinner every day ans a Christmas Dinner every Sunday.
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Tony C
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Great to see all the input to this thread.
In Denholms it seemed (no matter what ship you were on) that the Sunday menu
main courses were roast chicken for lunch and steak & chips for dinner.
I retrospect , I think we had it good for those days. Still hoping to be able to find
out how to make devilled kidneys the way I remember them.
David, thanks info re the nautical cookery book - it's the first solid lead I've had in a long time.
Ruud ;next time your cooking on of your MN banquets , give me a call. I can't be too
far away from you.

rgds to all.

JC
 

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John,

You've gone posh. What's all this 'devilled kidneys on toast' nonsense? Didn't the 'top table' refer to this entrée as 'sh*t on a raft', like the rest of us? (Thumb)
 

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Alas! Some Cooks of old still try to follow the tradition? Fridays= Curry & Fish & chips. Sunday= seafood cocktail + Steak et al. One to remind you it was the weekend, so on the pi**, the other to remind you "Its Monday tomorrow-Turn too". These days its Scotch Pies, Beefburgers (Where's the beef) But Omelettes are still in there with Cheese & Spanish still the favourites!! S.O.S.+ Same Old Sh*T? (Thumb)
 

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Baked Beans

Sunday morning on the Stag Line had the biggest breakfast que as this was the only day Baked Beans were served - definetely a delicacy
 

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Then there was the Hamburg Steak Malabar. What the kids call a beefburger before that name was invented, with a fried egg on top. That name may be peculiar to Brocklebanks, but the hamburgers put most of todays offerings to shame.

Later in the day our brand new PRC Chinese cook took New Yorks finest frozen hamburgers and reconstituted them. Twice the size, four times as good.

Coney Island Quail, Scotch woodcock, Eggs Florentine, Golden Buck Rarebit, Welsh Rarebit; Never said no as apprentice.
 

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Curry-munching

A great thread, gentlemen!
My most remembered meals on the City boats in the fifties (Colchester, Edinburgh and London) were the endless variations of curries (Bombay, Madras,Calcutta,Delhi etc etc, a totally new world for the young lad from post-war Brixton!
 

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Chris Field said:
A great thread, gentlemen!
My most remembered meals on the City boats in the fifties (Colchester, Edinburgh and London) were the endless variations of curries (Bombay, Madras,Calcutta,Delhi etc etc, a totally new world for the young lad from post-war Brixton!

So why do we only call it Delhi belly when we get the runs
 

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With all this food about on the forum almost makes me want to get a can of Condensed Milk for a spot of tea.
What more could one ask for after a run ashore. (Pint)
 

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The poor old catering department were often the 'whipping boy' if things wernt going too well aboard. It was a hard job especially when stores were running low homeward bound. Trying to turn out SOS (same old ****) on a daily basis was not a job I would relish.The humble potato would appear in many guises, boiled, roast, mashed(or creamed if you were P &O!), parsley,
stove, chipped, garfield, wafer, straw, croquette, lyonnaise, boulangere,
saute, I'm sure there are others?. Swede would also make a regular appearance homeward bound.

On one ship we had a particularly revolting cheese aboard which was served for ever on a daily basis, needless to say it was very unpopular. One day a diferent cheese appeared and was eaten and enjoyed by all. The next day we were back to the old revolting cheese. I asked the Chief Stewrd if there was any of the popular cheese left, he replied 'Oh yes plenty, the trouble is,
if I put it on the menu then everyone eats it!'

regards
Dave
 

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I also remember Palm Oil Chop (the chop stands for food) in Palm Line. It was served to we officers only on a sunday, in port. down the coast and was made with ingredients bought by the said officers and prepared by West African crew members (rather than the ships cook). It was preceded by a few gin & Tonics and was the most wonderful meal in the world. To cut the oil after the meal one always drank a neat gin.
A restaurant in Liverpool (the Bears Paw) used to provide this dish with four days notice and a minimum of 8 persons to serve.
This all took place in the 1950's. I often wonder how long it lasted.
Peter Baker.
 

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We used to get good food on the Accra in the early sixtys,I remember goig down to the seamans galley to beg the soup at smoko and if anybody sailed with E,d,s they will remember the palm stew that the kroo boy,s mamy,s used to make
 

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re: Colonial goose

neil maclachlan said:
Hi Folks,
When I sailed with Blue Star Lines the Food was fairly good when we had passengers aboard,but when in port it went downhill,nobody ate aboard. We used to have a salad called Russian Salad,no wonder Russia was such a happy country, During the voyage they would have on the menu a dish called colonial goose,it was always legs,we called it Blue Star centipede? They never gave you fresh milk but watered down condensed milk--yuk!
Cheers,
Neil Mac.
Hi Neil, I may have missed something, what was Colonial Goose. Ken. (Ouch)
 
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