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Spongebob
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Usually the bane of a hot summer but this one was welcome.
A Mosquito night fighter - bomber built during WW2 has been fully restored at an Auckland workshop on behalf of a weathly American collector and flew the skies yesterday.
Memorable for many , especially you older members that lived in the U.K. During that war.
The owner vows to get behind the joystick as soon as six test flying hours are completed.

Bob
 

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Saw the work on TV here short while ago...brilliant stuff...I used to draw them, and Lysanders, in my days in the Air Scouts...

geoff
 

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Knew a WW2 Mossie pilot who later flew Spitfire for the Buckhouse fly-past.
Whether purely sentimental reason or two Merlins are better than one not many can or would state their preference over the Spitfire.
 

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The prototype Mosquito is on display at Salisbury Hall near St Albans. It still has the repair to strengthen its fuselage that was done by De Havilland craftsmen when it crashed during trials at Farnborough during the war. It was hidden away in a barn for years so that it couldn't be scrapped. There are only a couple of very minor differences between this prototype and the planes that went into production, which proves that the design was technically sound, and the method of construction viable.

https://www.dehavillandmuseum.co.uk/

Click on "Gallery",and see image No.1. and 6, and scroll through the Aircraft and Exhibits tab to find the prototype DH98 machine for comparison.
 

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Nostalgia. In my eyes the most beautiful aircraft ever built, an early example of composite and just in time construction and production techniques. Ground breaking in every respect. If only the UK could achieve at this level today.
But thank goodness NZ are re-creating them again. I do hope the next one off the line finds its way back to the UK.
Well done NZ.
 

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Spongebob
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Discussion Starter #6
We had a local traffic officer during the late forties / early fifties that flew RAF Mosquitos during WW2 and received a DFC and bar for his efforts .
His surname was Winslow and he Knew every local lad by sight and kept us all in check be it bicycles, motor bikes or old cars , we call him the 'Winslow boy' behind his back but had huge respect for his due to his war record.
He finished up as traffic supervisor on the new Auckland Harbour bridge.

Bob
 

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We had a local traffic officer during the late forties / early fifties that flew RAF Mosquitos during WW2 and received a DFC and bar for his efforts .
His surname was Winslow and he Knew every local lad by sight and kept us all in check be it bicycles, motor bikes or old cars , we call him the 'Winslow boy' behind his back but had huge respect for his due to his war record.
He finished up as traffic supervisor on the new Auckland Harbour bridge.

Bob
Did he play a part on Mrs Bucket Bob.(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)
 

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The Military aviation museum here in Virginia Beach has a rebuilt Mosquto and it is beautiful. It was built in NZ and shipped over to the states. I believe there is a second in Western Canada too. When the US one first flew at a warbirds open weekend the wife got into conversation with a lady in the gift shop,while the wife was buying a Mossie polo shirt. The woman said oh my dad was a Mosquito pilot and he is here. He was 93 and looked better than me at 62. She took us over to meet him. Wing CommanderTom Horton DFC, DSO is an amazing person. A Kiwi by birth but lived many years in UK and USA. There is a radio program in Kiwi where they interview him and his stories make you wonder how he ever survived. He flew Fairy Battles on ship strikes when most got shot down, he flew a Blenheim to Gibraltar and one of the props came off just as he was landing, flying Mosquitoes he nearly died when they used to lob bombs into railway tunnels, except the first time he did it the bomb came out the other side just a he came over the top. He joined the Pathfinder squadron and made many trips. A most unassuming and noble man you could ever want to meet. A web search will bring up all you need to know about a truly remarkable man. He said he came to England on a passenger ship and was met by an RAF officer whose face was severely burned and wondered what he had let himself in for. I believe he also took part in the raid on the Oslo gestapo building but the bombs went right through and hit a Norwegian building.
 

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During the 1950s, as a member of the school Combined Cadet Force (RAF Section) I enjoyed the summer camp at RAF Shawbury, Shropshire which is now the RAF's Navigational School I believe.

One of the high points was that there was a dump of D-H Mosquitos awaiting disposal. A delight for avid teenage aircraft enthusiasts.

The low point was the compulsory life-saving and swimming tests in an outdoor pool at nearby Wem. How water could be that cold without a layer of ice on top escapes me but it was almost impossible to breathe once in the water.

Happy days
 

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Posts #10 and #13
The wing spars and ribs were made from carefully selected spruce and skinned with plywood.
The fuselage was built in halves on moulds. Plywood inner, balsa core and another outer plywood skin. Composite construction.
The concept, materials, design and production methods were all novel and the end results exceptional in all respects.
The phrase 'If it looks right it is right' has never been more apt.
Latest tv clip; https://www.facebook.com/133710429995732/posts/2441644509202301/
 

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One of the benefits of the build material was that it brought a whole pool of wood-working craftsmen into the aircraft industry.
 

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The glue used in the construction of them was Aerolite . If memory serves was made in Duxford in the U.K.
Used it on a couple of boat building projects, brilliant 2 part adhesive consisted of a white powder that was mixed with water and a acidic hardner.
Davie
 

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Spongebob
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Discussion Starter #18
The glue used in the construction of them was Aerolite . If memory serves was made in Duxford in the U.K.
Used it on a couple of boat building projects, brilliant 2 part adhesive consisted of a white powder that was mixed with water and a acidic hardner.
Davie
Yes Davie, that product preceded the later two-pot epoxy glues but Aerolite certainly stood the test of time.
In 1955 I built an eight foot plywood dingy using Aeorlite fastening and it certainly stood the test as when thirty years later the timber frames began to seriously rot and I safeguarded the kids by burning the craft on Guy Faux night . At that stage not a single glue joint had failed.
If a couple of vibrating Merlins couldn't loosen the bond nothing else could.

Bob
 

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The glue used in the construction of them was Aerolite . If memory serves was made in Duxford in the U.K.
Used it on a couple of boat building projects, brilliant 2 part adhesive consisted of a white powder that was mixed with water and a acidic hardner.
Davie
That's right Davie, they went on to produce Cascamite, and Cascafen which was used on boats, especially those built of multi layered skins of thin ply and veneers. Cascamite is still made, but now rebranded as Polyvine.
Interestingly, (or not,) the German aircraft industry had also started to develop an aircraft built using similar construction methods to the Mosquito. It was the Focke Wulf Ta 154, named Moskito. It was designed by Kurt Tank, and was also twin engined. Unfortunately for the Luftwaffe, the factory making the adhesive was bombed, possibly by accident, and they weren't able to make any more. Forced to use an inferior substitute, the planes built with this different adhesive tended to break up in the air.
 

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I laminated some major bits of a car body using 1/8 ply and cascamite, boy that was strong.
 
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