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Spongebob
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Discussion Starter #1
For some time now I have been receiving emails from other parties that were clearly not intended for me and using the exact xxxxxxxx @gmail.com address that I was allotted perhaps 19 years ago.
Googling the problem reveals that it is impossible for two parties to have the same address and sending one out myself results in the message boomeranging into my inbox straight away.
My Duplicate obviously lives in the London area and must have a few bob judging by the value range of real estate the Agents are inviting him to view and the motor vehicles proposed and offered for test driving.
In every case I reply to the senders advising of the wrong address and suggesting they draw their client's notice to the error but no comment or reply.
The most recent incomes is From Pavestone UK Ltd confirming his order for some paving tiles and the delivery address in Waltham Cross Hertfordshire so I now have a physical address at which to nail my double.
What puzzles me is that the people using this erroneous email address are all well established companies but none have bothered to contact me -or are my messages just disappearing into the ether?
A definite long term risk I imagine, any thoughts from the Buffs!

Bob
 

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You won't stop it, and by replying you are only confirming to the sender that your email addy is real.
Best bet would be to change your email addy.
 

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If you don't want to go that route, then I'd suggest contacting your email service provider and see what they make of it. I know it's not technically allowed for 2 identical email addresses, but bugs in their nature defy the rules

Kevin
 

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Change the password on both off your gmail accounts, then even if you get emails somebody cant get into it and send. Whenyou do go into this other account, check to see if you can see any user details, especialy if they are yours,
 

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Spoofed email address

Your email address has been spoofed and is only using the appearance of coming from your address.
The worst thing you can do is reply to these emails or attempt to contact the sender as this just confirms that you are a real person and will increase the number you receive.
Gmail can not help you as they have no control over these people, the only thin you can do is delete without opening and just ignore them.
 

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Spongebob
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thanks Norm and others,
I have established that this near namesake is an established business man living just North of London and the acknowledgement received from Pavestone UK quotes a bonifide physical home address outside of which gooole earth shows what is very much like the Peugeot 3008 quoted in another message re service from car dealer Robin and Day.
The security danger probably lies in his court when Pavestone Ltd quotes his credit card supplier and is last four digits.

All this now leads me to believe that he had issued some business cards with a misprinted email address or some other defect that incorrectlydiverts just some of his electronic mail my way .
At least it will give the man an opportunity to clarify the matter and ,hopefully leave me in peace

I will let you know the outcome.

Bob
 

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Phony E-mail addresses.

Hi Bob,
Over the past two years I've received a double figure of e-mails supposedly from friends but the e-mail addresses used have something not quite right in them so I ignore them and e-mail my friends asking if they have indeed sent them. The answers have been "NO". I never search for them or reply.
Phil.
 

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If you don't want to go that route, then I'd suggest contacting your email service provider and see what they make of it. I know it's not technically allowed for 2 identical email addresses, but bugs in their nature defy the rules

Kevin
Unfortunately it is not difficult for a spammer or other fraudulent user to spoof someone's email address (see: https://lifehacker.com/how-spammers-spoof-your-email-address-and-how-to-prote-1579478914. No, I haven't tried it! (Jester)

Thanks Norm and others,
I have established that this near namesake is an established business man living just North of London and the acknowledgement received from Pavestone UK quotes a bonifide physical home address outside of which gooole earth shows what is very much like the Peugeot 3008 quoted in another message re service from car dealer Robin and Day.
The security danger probably lies in his court when Pavestone Ltd quotes his credit card supplier and is last four digits.

All this now leads me to believe that he had issued some business cards with a misprinted email address or some other defect that incorrectlydiverts just some of his electronic mail my way .
At least it will give the man an opportunity to clarify the matter and ,hopefully leave me in peace

I will let you know the outcome.

Bob
It would seem that this user is not trying to do anything fraudulent, but his email address is very close to yours. Since addresses are very precise it only takes something like a full stop missing to send a mail off in the wrong direction. The sort of incidences that I have seen are, for example, Joe Public has an email address of joe.public, but someone emailing him might type joepublic. It is not at all uncommon for people of the same name (and world-wide that could be a lot of people) to have very closely similar email addresses, and so in the above case the second Joe could receive emails intended for the first simply by the sender having failed to insert a full stop.

Hi Bob,
Over the past two years I've received a double figure of e-mails supposedly from friends but the e-mail addresses used have something not quite right in them so I ignore them and e-mail my friends asking if they have indeed sent them. The answers have been "NO". I never search for them or reply.
Phil.
Some time ago I started to receive emails that purported to come from me into my business account. The account had clearly been spoofed with the intention of expecting me to open the mail out of curiosity. Since I did actually know when I sent emails to myself (sometimes for testing) I never opened them and just deleted them. A change in the password for that account using a password generator and 12 digits got rid of the problem, so the spoofer had perhaps obtained my password. Changing email account passwords is easy to do and is worth doing quite often. I also set up a filter that diverted and emails supposedly from myself to my junk folder.

Given that the Internet is about as secure as a boat made from a colander with all of the data leaks from Internet sites it is also worth an occasional check with a service like https://haveibeenpwned.com/ to see if anyone has hacked your data. (Thumb)
 

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There's a program called Mailwasher from Firetrust which lets you check your your emails on the Firetrust server before you download them
You can tick off which ones are spam and which ones are good and delete the rubbish. Then you just open your email client and download the legit ones
It's free for one email account but if you want to control multiple accounts you have to pay for the programme
https://www.mailwasher.net
 

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I have found that if you ignore the spam (don't open it) it eventually stops, that is until the next spammer decides to have a go..........

Frank
 

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Make the problem their problem then they'll do something about it. Like ordering the Peugeot in day-glo orange and say you want it delivered to the Cape Verde Islands.
Then just order all kinds of fake stuff like square pistons and titanium fan belts etc.
 

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Spongebob
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Discussion Starter #13
Using the address from the Pavestone UK invoice emailed to me in error I sent an airmail letter to the addressee which was cleared from our local Bethlehem post box on Tuesday evening 7/5/19 and I have received an email in reply from Britain dated 6.30 am 11/5/19.
Who said old fashioned services are falling apart!
That problem is now solved , free of sinister connotations, as my name sake confirms that the commercial senders have been careless in omitting a letter between his first and last name .
He will bollock them accordingly especially as they did not action or acknowledge my emails pointing out the address error and if there are future oversights I can simply forward the messages on.
The terror of scammers and evil interlopers have evaporated and peace reigns in our little corner of the earth once again on this Mother's Day Sunday.

Bob
 
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