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Recently I've been researching the voyages made by NZ coastal tankers and have come up with a number of overseas ports they have called at. I'm hoping that some Members may be able to help with the actual location of these ports and perhaps even some photos of them.
The ports concerned are:

Teluk Semanka
Labuan Amuk
Tg. Berlayer
Pulau Bukom
Kurnell
Westernport
Kwinana

Thanks.
 

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NZ Tankers

Flyer,
Kwinana is in Western Australia, a few miles south of Fremantle. There is a BP refinery there. Last went there in 1963.
I'm sure someone else on the site will help with the others.
Kind regards,
John F
 

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Spent some time in Indonesia with Djakarta Lloyd, so can help with;-
Teluk Semangka - Pertamina owned terminal in Teluk Semanka Bay on south-western tip of Sumatra in Sunda Strait. Scene of frequent pirate attacks. In history, place was wiped out by Krakatoa eruption.
Labuan Amuk - on Sumbawa Island. Think BP had a hand in operating this refinery for the Indonesians.
Tanjong Berlayer - refinery port for BP on Singapore Island
Pulau Bukom - site of Shell refinery on Singapore Island

Regards, Dennis.
 

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Terminals

Hi David

Kurnell is the Caltex refinary in Botany Bay, across the bay from Sydney airport and a few hundred metres from the spot where Capt Cook landed and opposite to the site where Capt La Perouse landed to bury on of his crew. La Perouse arrived first, Cook arrived later. Can't remember to the dates, 17???.

Regards

Blair lagerstedt
 

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NZ tankers overseas

Hi David

I don't have information on too many overseas trips by NZ tankers but I did operate the coastal tankers here from 1975 to 1992 and had an involvement before that. Two trips on which I have a bit of information were the Kotuku to Indonesia under co mand of Fred Kelner and the Amokura to Hawaii under the late David Lochhead. I've included both stories in a book I'm writing called Stormy Petrol?, the story of the joint venture in shipping in refining in New Zealand from 1964. Fred sent me pictures of Kotuku alongside the VLCC into which she pumped her entire cargo. She scarecly reached the VLCC's rail.

Regards

Mike

PS Of course there were many trips to Oz and Singapore etc when they went off the coast for survey. Also truips to Oz to take condensates from here or occasiobnally to collect inport cargoes. In 1985 we had the big expansion at Marsden Point refinery and all four ships made trips offshore.
 

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Westernport Bay isnt Port Phillip Bay. There are two bays , Port Phillip and Westernport. I have heard it said by a few that Port Phillip is the ******** of the world and Melbourne is 40 miles up it!! Western port is East of Port Phillip and is very much shallower and very tidal, although there is access to a BP refinery there and an LP gas installation.
 

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re Westernport

There are actually 3 Bays in the Port Phillip area,Westernport,Port Phillip, and Corio Bay ,which hosts the Port of Geelong.i worked in Westerport on the Tugs,for 3 months in the mid 1970s,and recall that the Channel was quite deep, to enable the big gas tankers and oil tankers to berth.Westernport was often "touted"as being the replacement Port for Melbourne,once it reached full capacity,but every time the matter was raised the "Green Movement" were "up in arms."
 

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Melbourne is on Port Phillip Bay not Western Port Bay. Western Port, or the Hastings Port proposal to take the overflow predicted from the Port of Melbourne, whenever that occurs, is still very much on the cards and, to the best of my experience, is widely preferred by the Green movement to the dredging proposal for Port Phillip Bay. That is not to say that the two are necessarily mutually exclusive, of course. The concerns for the environmental, or Green movement, is that depending on the water depths wanted by the operators, there may stjill be some dredging required in sensitiive areas. But it certainly wouldn't be as drastic as the the Port Phillip Bay dredging proposal.
CBoots
 

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Western Port is two words, not one, and it is deeper than Port Phillip. Dredging the The Rip, South Channel, Port Melbourne Channel the lower Yarra River and the berths, is not drastic and it has been done many times over the last 100 years, so what the fuss is about now God only knows. It appears that people forget the very reason for the existance of Melbourne - it is a port! Only a few years ago they blasted the limestone pinnacles at The Rip with hardly a murmer heard apart from the silvertails living at Portsea who suddenly found small cracks in their swimming pools.If the Greenies don't like living close to ports, they have an option. It is a bit like buying a house next to an airport and then complaining about the aircraft noise
 

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David, I will try to find out a bit more on these vessels upon my return (now off for nearly 2 months a you know).

Waimea, I agree with you on this point, however, a lot of people don't.
The dredging is required in order to see progress in the Port of Melbourne as otherwise all mega container vessels will have to be diverted to e.g. Adelaide and feeder ships will need to take over and the reputation of Australia's largest port would then be at stake.
I think the protests against this dredging has momentarily disappeared, yet the 600 million dollars investment to dredge the Channel in 2007 has yet to pass the local State Government.
For some dredging activities, i.e. the trial run, with the "Queen of the Netherlands", refer to: Main page -- dredgers -- first page Queen.....
The Channel requires deepening from about 11.5 metres to 13.5 metres and that won't even be enough to receive the next generation of container ships unless they only arrive with part cargo.
Jan
 

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Before Waimea starts making disparaging remarks about "greenies", whoever he imagines they might be, a quick appraisal of the facts may be to his benefit. The proposed dredging of the bay to allow access to vessels drawing up to fourteen metres is far more drastic than anything that has been done, or even contemplated before. The effects that this may have on the unique environment that is Port Phillip Bay are, frankly, unknown. That is why a fortune has been handed out to consultants to endeavour to forecast what the results might be and, as is to be expected, there is a great deal of controversy over the various findings. The current delay is largely the consequence of the discovery that the supporters of the proposal, headed by the port authority, ignored (some maintain suppressed) important findings in the major study that they themselves commissioned that did not suit their case. The State Government of Victoria entered the fray and insisted on further work being carried out. As well as being concerned for the environment I am an economist and I am simply unconvinced by the commercial arguments in favour of this project, especially as its advocates are not proposing spending their own money on it but rather expect the public purse to dig deep for their benefit. The largest container vessels trading at present are not engaged on the Australian trade, the volumes are simply not there in a small population such as ours. Container shipping has boomed in the last couple of decades because it has been able to offer cheap transport to an increasingly internationalised economy which has been happy to take advantage of it. But this could all come to a crashing halt with the end of cheap fuel. In short, why risk an environmental disaster to be left with an economic lemon?
I would note that this thread started as an enquiry on NZ coastal tanker ports of call. The Bay dredging proposal would make an extremely interesting thread provided that we refrain from a "Herald Sun" type of insult swapping and stick to the arguments.
CBoots
 

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Didn't realise that people who have the ego to descibe themselves as "gentleman" ever sailed with Furness Withy.

I know a Greenie when I see one, and you sound like one to me. Thanks for the leasson but I've read it all before! If the thread was originally about NZ tankers, then why have you felt obliged not to stick to it and, having suggested we refrain from insult swapping, why have you the then got the arrogance to insult me? Thank God I never sailed with you, but then again perhaps I did.
 

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Waimea, are there any prejudices that you do not possess? Greenies, Furness Withy people, those who dare to point out your ignorance to you, the list appears to be endless.
CBoots
 

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lagerstedt said:
Hi David

Kurnell is the Caltex refinary in Botany Bay, across the bay from Sydney airport and a few hundred metres from the spot where Capt Cook landed and opposite to the site where Capt La Perouse landed to bury on of his crew. La Perouse arrived first, Cook arrived later. Can't remember to the dates, 17???.

Regards

Blair lagerstedt
You're right about Kurnell and Cook's landing place, Blair, but Cook's arrival predated that of La Perouse by 18 years. Cook landed at Botany Bay in 1770. The First Fleet, under Captain Arthur Phillip, arrived in January, 1778, and La Perouse turned up a few days later on January 26th, just as Phillip and Co were leaving Botany Bay for Port Jackson. La Perouse's ships "Astrolabe" and "Boussole" were lost later the same year in a storm in the Solomons.

Rule Britannia.

John T.
 
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