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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is the list of Oberon class subs.
Regarding the british one, I would like to know their actual fate.
Thank you.

O-class submarine
Royal Navy
Oberon
Ocelot
Odin
Olympus
Onslaught
Onyx
Opportune
Opossum
Oracle
Orpheus
Osiris
Otter
Otus

Royal Australian Navy
Onslow
Orion
Otama
Otway
Ovens
Oxley

Royal Canadian Navy
Ojibwa
Okanagan
Onondaga
Olympus
Osiris

Brazilian Navy
Humaita
Riachuelo
Tonelero

Chilean Navy
O'Brien
Hyatt
 

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Onyx was until recently part of the historic ships collection at Birkenhead.
I'm not sure what's happened to her now that they have lost their berth and the Trust which ran them has gone bust.
 

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Otway

The “Otway” has surfaced.

Ron

Holbrook
New South Wales

You tend to see some surprising things while on a long drive in the country, but few could beat coming into a town that has its very own submarine.
Even more surprising when you consider Holbrook is more than 200 kilometers inland and on the Hume Highway between Sydney and Melbourne.
The vessel isn't the full submarine, but it is the above-waterline structure of the HMAS Otway.
The Otway was one of six Oberon-class subs built for the Royal Australian Navy between 1966 and 1979.
It is 90 meters long, some eight meters wide, and was powered by diesel/electric motors.
The Otway was usually crewed by at least 65 men.
The sub was brought to Holbrook by local fundraising, although the widow of the Victoria Cross-winning Commander Norman Holbrook, donated the bulk of the moneys - some $100,000.
In World War One, the then Lt Norman Holbrook took submarine B-11 into the Dardenelles Strait and torpedoed the Turkish battleship Messoudieh.
Upon the vessel's safe return he was awarded the first naval VC, while his crew earned the Distinguished Service Medal.
Near the submarine final resting spot is a small museum that is worth popping in to see. Plans are underway to reconstruct the control area of the Otway.
Meantime, the Otway is much beloved by local children - and parents desperate for a break in a long drive.
And fancy being a truck driver heading into town for the first time in a fog - it would make the person wonder if he'd taken a wrong turn somewhere!
 

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Royal Canadian Navy

Ojibwa
Okanagan
Onondaga

Above three Paid Off and laid up in Halifax, Nova Scotia, awaiting decision on sale or scrapping.


Olympus
Osiris

Long gone, will check disposition and let you know.

Submarines are not the most popular topic here since we bought the four, new to us, Trafalgar class from Britiain. Only one, HMCS Victoria partially working on the West Coast, two. HMCS Cornerbrook and HMCS Windsor in refit to do work that we should made part of the deal before we bought them and HMCS Chicoutimi hidden in a shed out of the media's sight in Halifax after the disasterous fire off Northern Ireland. Good old Joseph Lucas strikes again. Now using her for spare parts to keep the others afloat.

Still think we got one hell of a deal albiet badly built and then badly maintained to our "expert" Ottawa desk Admirals specifications while in lay up in the UK. Our policticians didn't want to announce the purchase for 2 years.

BAE built them and guess what, just been awarded the contract to maintain them for the next five years. The mind boggles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you very much.
Actually, my question comes from a text I read some time ago stating that two ex-brit O-Class were sold/transfer or given to Egypt.
But I can't confirm.
Keltic Star said:
Royal Canadian Navy
Submarines are not the most popular topic here since we bought the four, new to us, Trafalgar class from Britiain.
I believe you mean Upholder. The T-boats are not for sale.
Well, their fate is half yours.
I was living in Canada at that time.
They took ten years to take the decision, couldn't find the arguments to pass the bill.
Sade thing some had to pay that mistake with their life...
 

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Thank you very much.
Actually, my question comes from a text I read some time ago stating that two ex-brit O-Class were sold/transfer or given to Egypt.
But I can't confirm.

I believe you mean Upholder. The T-boats are not for sale.
Well, their fate is half yours.
I was living in Canada at that time.
They took ten years to take the decision, couldn't find the arguments to pass the bill.
Sade thing some had to pay that mistake with their life...
My mistake Francois5, should have been Upholder class, probably just wishful thinking on my part that we had Trafalgar class.
Yes, no doubt about it, we are equally to blame but as I said, I stil think they were the deal of the Century despite the ongoing costs.
Cheers
Bob
 

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The thing about the Upholder class is that they were designed from the start to have the stern machinery spaces cut off and a reactor compartment added in a lengthened hull which would have made them almost identical to the Trafalgar class SSN's. They're also very strong , built from the same steel as SSN's so they have a far greater diving depth than most SSK's. The fire onboard and the sad loss of life was totally avoidable too , the captain decided to surface in poor weather and when they opened the hatch ( think it was part of a drill too ) the sea poured in shorting out the main distribution panel causing the fire.

She should be repairable but depending on cash it could take a long time to see her back at sea. They were initially going to have a full AIP ( Air Independant Propulsion ) system fitted similar to the Swedish SSK's but thats been put back by 8 years at least.

Davie
 

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Davie Tait said:
The fire onboard and the sad loss of life was totally avoidable too , the captain decided to surface in poor weather and when they opened the hatch ( think it was part of a drill too ) the sea poured in shorting out the main distribution panel causing the fire.

She should be repairable but depending on cash it could take a long time to see her back at sea. They were initially going to have a full AIP ( Air Independant Propulsion ) system fitted similar to the Swedish SSK's but thats been put back by 8 years at least.

Davie
Davie:
I have to jump to the Captain's defence here, he was not held accountable in the Official Inquiry which was conducted by professional mariners who were in possesion of detailed facts that we in the public are not aware of. Furthermore I have not heard any scuttlebutt from those on the mess decks to suggest a cover up.

Quote by the CBC on May 5th. 2005 with extracts from the Inquiry report as follows:

* An air vent in Chicoutimi's tower wasn't working because a nut had fallen off, just 24 hours into the vessel's first trip to Canada. Crewmembers had to leave two hatches open to fix the problem, and were working on it when a wave broke over the vessel, flooding the compartments below.

* A series of electrical connectors in the captain's room that were soaked in the flooding had only one layer of waterproof sealant instead of the three layers that British navy specifications required.

The investigation also found that the British navy upgraded its specifications for insulating the electrical connections on Upholder-class vessels in the 1990s. Two additional layers of sealant were recommended to provide "backup protection." The sealant was added to the other three British subs as they were being built, but not to HMS Upholder, the vessel that would later be named HMCS Chicoutimi and sold to Canada.

On May 5, 2005, a Canadian naval board of inquiry released a 700-page report on the accident. It found that no one was to blame for the series of events that led to the fire.

"This was a combination of human, technical and operational factors that led to a tragic death," said Admiral Bruce MacLean, commander of the Canadian navy, at a news conference in Halifax.

The report concluded that Luc Pelletier, the Chicoutimi's captain, made rational and reasonable decisions the day the fire broke out.

Pelletier's decision to leave both hatches on the submarine open because of the mechanical problem with their vents was at the root of the inquiry. The board found that there was no way he could have predicted that a rogue wave would wash in, flooding the submarine with 2,000 litres of water and cause the events that led to the fire.

Remember the shelter deck design, we never expected that to leak into the lower decks because it was designed and built properly in the first place. Neither do I remember considering that a rogue wave might swamp the ship when deciding to open a watertight access for emergency maintenence purposes, in what, in my judgement was reasonable weather,

Just my two cents worth
Bob
 

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Here is the list of Oberon class subs.
Regarding the british one, I would like to know their actual fate.
Thank you.

O-class submarine
Royal Navy
Oberon
Ocelot
Odin
Olympus
Onslaught
Onyx
Opportune
Opossum
Oracle
Orpheus
Osiris
Otter
Otus

Royal Australian Navy
Onslow
Orion
Otama
Otway
Ovens
Oxley

Royal Canadian Navy
Ojibwa
Okanagan
Onondaga
Olympus
Osiris

Brazilian Navy
Humaita
Riachuelo
Tonelero

Chilean Navy
O'Brien
Hyatt
I think ovens was cut up at the old ASI shipyard in Henderson WA,now hanseatic marine.One of them is on display on land at the maritime museum in Fremantle,not sure which one.I think one is in reserve for the Collins class which replaced them,built at ASC outer harbour Adelaide.six Collins class.
 

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HMS Onslaught.

Hms Onslaught was a frequent visitor to my home town of Blyth in Northumberland, I beleive her crew were given "Freedom of the Borough".
She was held in great respect in Blyth, so much so that when she was decommissioned her Conning tower name plaque was presented to the town and now hangs up in our local community hospital.
One sad point was that with the demise of the "O" class subs the replacment class were deemed too large to visit Blyth, hence now no subs visit Blyth a town with such strong Submariner traditions.

Peter
 

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The OTAMA..now moored at Crib Point in Westernport Bay Victoria is to come ashore at Crib Point where the ship and an associated Interpretation Centre will be built ..The site will be named Hastings Cerberus maritime Memorial Centre ...Collin
 

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Hi

Thank you very much.
Actually, my question comes from a text I read some time ago stating that two ex-brit O-Class were sold/transfer or given to Egypt.
But I can't confirm.

I believe you mean Upholder. The T-boats are not for sale.
Well, their fate is half yours.
I was living in Canada at that time.
They took ten years to take the decision, couldn't find the arguments to pass the bill.
Sade thing some had to pay that mistake with their life...
The two Submarines offered to Egypt were, I seem to remember reading somewhere, where two of the Porpoise Class subs. I will try to find out more.
In the meantime, have a look at this site: http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/rn/submarine/oberon/ and this one: http://www.hazegray.org/navhist/canada/postwar/oberon/ and while you are at it, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oberon_class_submarine & http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/oberon_class.htm
Regards
Karl
 

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I'm a little late to this party but I'll add some pictures.

HMCS Onondaga, HMCS Ojibwa, HMCS Okanagan and the Olympus in Halifax, Summer 2004.

Sorry - I don't know which is which (except Olympus, with the older sonar, is 2nd from the dock).

Two Restigouche class DDEs as well - I believe HMCS Gatineau alongside with HMCS Terra Nova rafted to her. Terra Nova was used to film K-19 - The Widowmaker, playing a USN destroyer.





 

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Porpoise Class
Cachalot - Scrapped Blyth 1980
Finwhale - Scrapped Cantabria (spain) 1988
Grampus - Lost whilst in use as a target 1980
Narwhal - Sunk as a dive / salvage training site 1983
Porpoise - Sunk as a target 1985
Rorqual - Scrapped Plymouth 1977
Sealion - Sold to Inner Action charitable group in 1988 and later scrapped Blyth.
Walrus - Sold to Humber Ship Repairers 1987

Oberon Class
Oberon - Sold to Humber Ship Repairers 1987
Odin - Scrapped Aliga Turkey 1991
Orpheus - Scrapped Pounds 1994
Olympus - Sold to Canada 1989
Osirus - Sold to Canada 1992 and stripped for spares then scrapped Garston
Onslaught - Scrapped Aliga Turkey 1991
Otter - Scrapped Pounds 1991 (stripped for spares to Chile)
Oracle - Sold to Pounds 1995 (resold for scrapping Aliaga but foundered off
Gibraltar 2004
Ocelot - Museum Chatham 1992
Otus - Sold Pounds 1991 later resold to become museum in Germany
Oppossum - Scrapped Pounds 1995
Opportune - Scrapped Pounds 1995
Onyx - Museum 1991

With regards to the sale of subs to Egypt, Humber Ship Repairers hoped to refurbish and resale the Walrus and Oberon which were renamed Seaforth A and Seaforth B to the several interested parties including the Egyptians. No deal was forthcoming and the subs were eventually broken up at Grimsby (as seen in the earlier posted pictures).
 
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