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Discussion Starter #1
I have a copper lamp, similar to an anchor light, which has been in my garage, uncared for, for decades.

I would like to clean it and polish it. I have made a start by giving it a bath in bleach, which seems to be quite useless.

Any better ideas, please? Duraglit works, but the task is monumental, as I know that it would also be be with Brasso and bunting. What I really need to know, please, is the name of the right chemical to shift the worst of the decades of tarnish?

Best wishes,

BY.
 

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Household ammonia in the first instance Barrie and then Antiquax Copper and Brass Bath. If it is lacquered something to remove that first.

I have just done this with some brass lamp holders found in a 1959 military engine telegraph. On the same project the casting and what was in it got vapour blasted. Some brass bits and components were left inside, being then difficult to remove. This has resulted in a beautiful finish.
 

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Vinegar and salt: Rub a mixture of 1 tablespoon of table salt and 1 cup of white vinegar onto the copper with a soft cloth and rinse. Or, immerse the tarnished copper into a pot of 3 cups of water and the salt-vinegar mixture, bring to a boil and boil until the grime and tarnish comes off.

Also try....

Acetone
Citrus juice


Try any of these to get the grime off then go for the Brasso for the polish.

If you don't want to do the work yourself... go to a professional cleaning company... they will strip anything. I took a beautiful brass binnacle to the stripper. Perfect. If you don,t want to do all over again every couple of years, get them to put a lacquer on the piece.

Stephen

PS Here is the binnacle. Must be 80 years old... came of a small local ferry. It used to be in my office when I was Harbour Master. Cleaned it up a treat. No one had ever bothered before. When I left I took it home to keep it for safekeeping. I did the job myself byt the last time I took it to the stripper.
 

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If possible remove the glass.

Get a large plastic bucket and fill with hot water

Dissolve some household soda in the water

Put some scrunched up aluminium foil in the mixture

Immerse the lamp

Watch it come clean

Rinse off and polish.

Rubber gloves, goggles and old clothes are advised.

If you manage to take the glass out "Brasso" works well on this (Found that out on boiler gauge glass covers - now use it on the gas fire and oven windows)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Very many thanks, Chaps, for all advice.

Am going away for the weekend and will report again in a few days.

Repeated thanks,

B
 

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Barrie,
I can only tell you what wont work, after much bitter experience on the focsle bell of Achilles when I was deck boy....Roses Lime Juice applied with wads of cotton waste.
Regards
Pat(EEK)
 

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The secret is to do it every couple of it every couple of days.. before it gets gungy!

Why didn't I think of that! I could have spent every other afternoon on the focsle, wearing oilskins and seaboots, shackled to the windlass, while she shipped mountains of green water all the way from Lynas to Gibralter.(Jester)
 

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Magic!

Very many thanks, Chaps. It shineth as the brightest star in the galaxy!

I removed the glass and then followed Stephen's recipe, his ingredients being readily to hand. I needed to double-up on volume in order to fit all into the pan. I then boiled the whole shebang for a good hour and the result is as stated.

I look forward to putting it all back together.

Repeated thanks!

B
 

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colza

I have a copper lamp, similar to an anchor light, which has been in my garage, uncared for, for decades.

I would like to clean it and polish it. I have made a start by giving it a bath in bleach, which seems to be quite useless.

Any better ideas, please? Duraglit works, but the task is monumental, as I know that it would also be be with Brasso and bunting. What I really need to know, please, is the name of the right chemical to shift the worst of the decades of tarnish?
colza oil and bathbrick,worked on old merchant ships(Thumb)
Best wishes,

BY.
colza oil and bathbrick,,from the old merchant ships(Thumb)
 

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colza oil and bathbrick,,from the old merchant ships(Thumb)
That is from the old seamanship 'Handbook'. I'll search for it.. somewhere in the house!

Had colza oil available on the ship... used in the canvas bag full of oakum soaked with colza oil... attach it out to the sea anchor to help calm in the sea. Never found 'bathbrick'. Had I had some I could have passed the time in my lifeboat to polish the oil lamp!

Same book.... to clean a clock. Soak a small amount piece of cotton soaked in turpentine. Set it inside the lower part of the casing. The fumes of the turps will oil attach to the dirt and dust in the 'works'.

Lot's of things. How to mix 'red lead'.... red lead powder with linseed oil!

While searching the shelf found a hard bound copy of SEA BREEZES.. January to June... 1952! also a copy of SHIP'S ANNUAL for 1957. Also a copy THE P&O POCKET BOOK (Fourth Issue)… 1926! THE MERCHANT SERVICE TO-DAY by Leslie Howe, published 1941. Ah well, I'll find the other book somewhere along.
 

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We were in----

---Jeddah, anchored, and waiting our turn to go alongside, (remember "Hank the Yank", anyone who went there?), and the Chief asked me if I fancied taking the motor-lifeboat for a "run", a "request" I readily agreed to.
We headed for one of the many sunken wrecks which littered the area, mainly because it wasn't as deeply sunk as most were.
Went aboard, (I think it was ex-Moss-Hutchison), headed for the engine room and there, bolted to the bottom of a 'tread' on the engine-room ladder, was a brass bell 6" deep and 6" across the mouth.
As ever I had my shifter with me so liberated the bell, took it back to the ship and set-to with "Brasso" 'til it shone like the proverbial 'tanner-up-a-sweeps a**e'.
The 'rope' had rotted-away so asked one of the QM's, (Willy McKay), if he could make a new one, which he did, producing a beautifully intricate example of a bell-rope, finished-off with a 'larger-than-the-main-rope' ball.
Doubtless some "readers" will be musing, "How the ferk can the old f**t remember such detail from 56 years-ago?" because, chaps/chapesses, said bell is hanging from the bracket I made for it and which is screwed to the chimney breast in my front room!
The one sad thing, about the bell, is that the name of the ships isn't on it so it's 'just another brass bell'.
However it does have a yarn attached to it! Phil
 

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Magic!

Very many thanks, Chaps. It shineth as the brightest star in the galaxy!

I removed the glass and then followed Stephen's recipe, his ingredients being readily to hand. I needed to double-up on volume in order to fit all into the pan. I then boiled the whole shebang for a good hour and the result is as stated.

I look forward to putting it all back together.

Repeated thanks!

B
Excellent, can we have a photo please?
 

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Why didn't I think of that! I could have spent every other afternoon on the focsle, wearing oilskins and seaboots, shackled to the windlass, while she shipped mountains of green water all the way from Lynas to Gibralter.(Jester)

Ahhh. That is not how it is done. At the end of the voyage take the bell off the foscle and put it INSIDE the foscle. Clean and give it a coat of Vaseline. Next port... wipe it clean and you are ready to ring the bell. If you are caught in some nasty weather, just go as you are told. Polish the bell... dry under foscle. OK, perhaps a bit of 'motion' but no one (as in bosun) will bother to check you until it is time for your lunch pint.

Stephen
 

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Ahhh. That is not how it is done. At the end of the voyage take the bell off the foscle and put it INSIDE the foscle. Clean and give it a coat of Vaseline. Next port... wipe it clean and you are ready to ring the bell. If you are caught in some nasty weather, just go as you are told. Polish the bell... dry under foscle. OK, perhaps a bit of 'motion' but no one (as in bosun) will bother to check you until it is time for your lunch pint.

Stephen
You have missed the fact that I was a deck boy at the time. I did as I was told. "Polish the bell on the focsle with lime juice and cotton waste".
It didnt work, it would never work in a million years. It was sadistic bosun v 16 yr old peggy.(EEK)
 

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You have missed the fact that I was a deck boy at the time. I did as I was told. "Polish the bell on the focsle with lime juice and cotton waste".
It didnt work, it would never work in a million years. It was sadistic bosun v 16 yr old peggy.(EEK)
Better known as 'character building'. When you were rated on the next ship as JOS or AB you should have gone to the Bosun ( a better one hopefully) and volunteered to polish the bell.... UNDER the focsle to do the work!
 

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I have a copper lamp, similar to an anchor light, which has been in my garage, uncared for, for decades.

I would like to clean it and polish it. I have made a start by giving it a bath in bleach, which seems to be quite useless.

Any better ideas, please? Duraglit works, but the task is monumental, as I know that it would also be be with Brasso and bunting. What I really need to know, please, is the name of the right chemical to shift the worst of the decades of tarnish?

Best wishes,

BY.
Brown sauce!! While working on Waverley, talking to an older lady passenger she stated she was responsible for her church candle holders and always used brown sauce.....seemingly cheaper than brasso!
Dannic.
 

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Probably works too! Vinegar or citrus is same.

I use 'Duraglit'. Special cotton with 'a chemical' impregnated. Works well but your hands get black. Recently I tried to use surgical gloves to keeo the hands clean. Within of a minute's use the latex gloves dissolved! Useless.
 
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