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Did they manage to stiff you with staging as well, Ron?

Got arrested in DD at TDE for (amongst other things) wrong frequency of hooter. Mast just destaged after painting - had to be restaged again just for the new typhon a similar job I was expected to do alone off the foremast ladder (not quite alone - Chief Eng John Benn shouting encouragement from the deck).
 

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Discussion Starter #22
The Leith Nautical College installation on my joining was the Oceanspan MkI with two rotary transfomers for the ht one for the dc ships mains input (DC courtesy Edinburgh Tram Corp) and the other for the 24v battery emergency supply.
The CR300 receiver, Type M auto alarm and Lodestone DF receiver supplies were vibrator packs built into the Oceanspan cabinet.
In my limited experience and for it's time I rate this as one of the finest MF/HF marine transmitters ever made.
 

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Thanks very much for the youtube link.

Wonderful.

I joined my first ship in 1980...at the end of the British MN.

It must have been fantastic to have so many ships to choose from in the 60s...
 

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The Reliance had the 600 volt line fed via simple plug and socket. One RO was killed by the 600 volt as he bent over to clean the motor commutater. When I joined the sister ship in late 59 was given a talk regarding cleaning commutators on the 600 volt Reliance motor, and that it was totally verboten so to do.
Obviously did not attempt to do this.
 

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The Reliance had the 600 volt line fed via simple plug and socket.
The line had to be disconnected to withdraw the transmitter for maintenance (the unit was hinged at the bottom and swung forwards and down to withdraw). Clearly this was not something to be done whilst the unit was powered up.

At Brooks Bar, we were being given instruction during preparation for 2nd Class PMG (in what we called "the gear room") on the Reliance transmitter by the owner of the college, Mr Woods. Woody was a somewhat thespian character, fond of bow ties and suits with silk handkerchiefs flowing from the breast pocket. He was also fond of theatrical gestures to emphasise points during lectures - well during any conversation, actually.

He had run up the Reliance with the front cover removed and was standing in front of it, slightly to one side. While stressing the danger of the HT supply, without looking he waved his arm to the side to point to the hazard. Unfortunately for him, he was closer to it than he thought and his hand came into contact with it.

The results were spectacular and just like a Tom and Jerry cartoon as he was propelled backwards across the room, still in an upright position, until he hit the wall with a thud. He stayed there for a fraction of a second and then his feet slid forwards and his body slid slowly down the wall until his buttocks reached the floor.

The whole class was overtaken by fits of laughter and I confess that nobody moved to help him for several seconds. He came round after a minute or so and took the rest of the day off. We went to the pub as it was after 11 o'clock and they were open!

It certainly demonstrated the dangers of carelessness when working on the Reliance but after all this time I believe he went over the top to get his message across.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
One RO was killed by the 600 volt as he bent over to clean the motor commutater.
Would this mean the rotary transformer was actually running as he was about to clean the commutator?
I remember the Reliance power switch slot was especially shaped so that the front panel could not be removed with power to on but cannot remember if the rotary transformer was integral or external. I think the latter.
 

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I think the ship the RO was electrocuted on was the Border Regiment. I think he was cleaning the commutators with a commutator cleaning rod. It was hot wx and as far as I was told as he reached into the unit his chest came into contact with with the plug/ socket 600v line. The mates tried the resusitation procedure but after a while had to give up. Was warned about this by GTZM techs and the superintendent of Commons.
Very sad story, I understand that he was not very old.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Yes it is very sad and I have to admit this is the first instance I've ever heard of a R/O fatality like this.
 

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We lost an R/O in Australia in a similar situation - he was working on a ships telephone exchange and went across the a/c mains...
 

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I had a 600v shock via the isolating transformer of an O'span being open circuit, the 600v was on the aerial, and as the tx kept tripping went onto the monkey island, grabbed the wire and was flung across the island. Not a good experience.
Since that time, was very wary of touching aerials with the ac on.
The Regiment was the only loss of life I was aware of, it just shows how lucky we all were sorting out eht problems etc!
 

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Sorry just noticed erase open, substitute short circuit. Senior moment!
Now I know why they call you "Yorkysparx", Yorkysparx.

On "Anna von Bargen" the Debeg Main Transmitter wouldn't tune. I switched it off and pulled out the heavy PA and Aerial tuning unit. The PA section was connected to the aerial by a length of wire and a jack plug and the jackplug had fallen out. I reached across the valves to get hold of the plug and .... Zappo! I saw sparks flying between the valve anodes and my arm! I leapt back and the unit, which I 'd been supporting with my chest, came out and hit the deck, missing my big toe by a whisker and digging a slice an inch deep in the
composition deck. Talk about a comedy of errors! Hearing the commotion and squeals, the Mate came off the bridge into the wireless room. Surveying the situation, he pointed to a sign on the power unit of the transmitter and carefully enunciated in German: "Hoch Spannung!" "F*** Off", I replied in carefully enunciated Anglo Saxon.

I've still got the scars on my forearm if I get a tan, but, luckily, Ive still got my big toe too.

John T

PS There was a lot to be said for those Z connectors at the back of Oceanspans - they could be a nuisance, but they disconnected everything!
 

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.

I've still got the scars on my forearm if I get a tan, but, luckily, Ive still got my big toe too.

John T

Very simialr experience on "La Loma"/GPEF. Crusader top drawer out and the only way to measure with AVo from it's right side was to sit on the MIMCo console, by pass the micro switch (yes I know!!!), and get stuck into the drawer. Left shoulder made contact with the EHT, burning a hole in arm, and exited through left buttock to ground via the steel of the console edging, leaving yet another hole. Meantime I was unconcious butTrainee R/O Brian Garrigan gave me a hefty kick to clear me from the volts as I was about to go in for another dose. Still have the scars at either end from 20 years ago. Could I be the only R/O with 2 stern tubes??(Cloud)(Cloud). Replies in pencil on used £10 notes please.
 

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Talking of shocks:
My last ship was the Shell tanker DORCASIA/GSZE.
Off the wheelhouse was a small cabin containing all sorts of gear including the gyro compass and the radar gubbins.
On the bench was a weird looking thing which resembled a fencer's (swordsman's) metal gauze face protector.
I knew not what it was until much later.

One afternoon ploughing across the Indian Ocean the radar display failed.
I remember it had double doors on the cabinet housing the PPI CRT & etc.
I was crouched down on the deck trying to measure some innocuous voltages when my forehead touched the anode top caps of the modulator (or summat) valves.

What followed was worthy of a Brian Rix farce.

According to the OOW who was in the chart room I gave out a load groan and when he looked, there was I slumped unconscious on the deck, white as a sheet.
After a quick check to make sure I was not still touching the radar he returned to the chart room to telephone the OM.

While he was doing that I came to but was obviously away with the fairies and not thinking straight.
I staggered unobserved out to the wing of the bridge and made my way down two decks of exterior companionway to my cabin.

Meanwhile, the 2nd Mate, having called the OM, came back into the wheelhouse - no Sparks to be seen.
Panic! Where was I? Had I jumped over the wall?

The OM arrived and sent the 2nd Mate out onto the bridge wing to look and then down the same exterior companionway to try and find me.

By this time I had recovered somewhat and decided I had better return to the bridge - which I did via the interior companionway, two decks up.

The 2nd Mate looked in my cabin - no Sparks, further panic.

When I arrived back on the bridge - still as white as a sheet apparently - the OM was mightily relieved,
as was the poor old 2nd Mate when he got there!

Suffice to say that there was an entry in the ship's log that in Lat/Long the R/O received a near-fatal electric shock and was relieved of his duties for the rest of the day.

I had a nasty burn on my forehead and my left thumb was numb as the return path to the metalwork.

It then dawned on me the purpose of the epée face guard.
A previous R/O had removed the protective guard and failed to re-install it after servicing the display unit.

Obviously I lived to tell the tale.
 
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