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My ship carries refrigerated containers and the electricians look after them, with assistance from fitter when needed.
Record so far is 1620 reefer boxes carried, with 2 electricians to look after them.
 

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Hello Bob, your right about Reefers not posting. I did many trips on OCL Bay Ships with the Chief Fridge, Graham Santi, he was the best Fridge Eng in the MN ( well he said he was ! ) Graham went onto the P&O Cruise ships and has now retired, what a brilliant bloke tho, never a dull moment on any ship he was on, doubt he will read this, he doesn't have Email, Facebook and doubt if he uses a Mobile phone. Best regards, Pete Axon ex 3/O/E
Sure it wasn't Mike Santi?
We had a Chief Freezer from P&O passenger ships join Blue Star mid '70's and he was quite a character. Never saw him dirty. Think he used to supervise the fridge and mains greasers to do any dirty work.
 

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On a Whitco reefer Orchidea we were anchored in Tokyo bay in a heatwave.The air con was down and we were putting damp towels in our cabin fridges in an attempt to keep cool.About 2 am on a sleepless night my missus and i wandered down to the bar to find it packed as we drank cold beers and complained the Reefer wandered down,looking surprised he asked why we were all down at that hour of the night.When we told him he said`That`s funny it`s cool in my cabin`
 

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Refrigeration Engineers

My memory frequently plays tricks with me nowadays but I'm sure that on the big Houlder meat boats, there were three frig.engineers. As I recall they were men of long service in the company and always appeared to be a satisfied bunch. I never gave them much thought as they simply "got on with the job".
 

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8 February 1968 3 A/E me joined a C3 SS Pecos in Yokahama - it was a fly-out job to replace an engineer with a broken leg. 3 April 68 promoted to 2 A/E I signed on another voyage. The vessel had been owned and operated by Matson for decades under three different names. Oriental Exporters/Ogden Marine was operating her in 1968.

The vessel had freezer boxes outboard of the square of the hatch in the upper and 'tween cargo decks. We loaded frozen foods at the Alameda Reefer Dock in San Francisco Bay. Once the reefer was aboard we shifted over to OAT [Oakland Army Terminal]. Where we loaded POV's [Privately Owned (US Military members) Vehicles] in the square of the hatch of the upper and 'tween cargo decks.

Outbound we stopped first at Pearl Harbor US Navy Base for two days then shifted over to Honolulu to complete discharging the POV's. Then we would go on to Midway Island where we discharged the entire reefer. This contract for the reefer and POV's came with the ship.

US flag ships that I sailed the tanker pump men, stick ship general cargo electricians, and reefer refrigeration engineers were unlicensed personnel. Being Hawaii is an American port and we were in there for a weekend we engineers were relieved of watch keeping by local union members ie: Night Engineers.

I don't know where the idea came from but our first 24 hours in Pearl the two reefer engineers, who worked six and six, were given 24 hours off; with we engineers standing our regular watches in the reefer machinery space. I stood two watches there and I had NO knowledge or experience of what I was doing. I was nervous as a cat. I adhered to the advice given - don't TOUCH anything. In the end everything ran like clockwork but I was glad to get out of that space. We engineers then had the weekend off having to return to shift from Pearl to Honolulu.

We had rented an open with a canvas top, four place, tiny, imported from Japan Jeep like vehicle, and a Honda three wheeler motorcycle, with a pair of black leather seats in back facing aft. We five shall we say 'feeling-no-pain' engineers showed up for the shift. We got the mates to load our rental vehicles on deck, we WERE set up for handling vehicles. It took all five of us to make the shift -- the C/E was on the throttle - none of us even put on our work clothes. Soon as our Night Engineer reported for duty - he had driven his car from Pearl - we left. The mates stuck out toys on the pier and off we roared.

Once the reefer cargo was gone in Midway, the two reefer engineers worked for the 1 A/E days on reefer room and engine room maintenance and repairs. After Midway we went on to Japan and Vietnam returning to Eureka CA 10 June '68 where we loaded a deck cargo of wooden timbers. I paid off 14 June '68 at OAT in Oakland.

Greg Hayden
 

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I joined the RMS Deseado as 4th Engineer on her last trip up the West Coast. At voyage end she was dry-docked in Hamburg and was converted to a fully refrigerated vessel for the South American meat run. With a full cargo she had 3 Freezers, Chief, 2nd, and 3rd.
We would travel from London to Buenos Aires empty, with a Chief and 2nd Freezers in place who would be basically both be on day-watch duty. The engine room would carry an extra junior engineer outward bound who on arrival in BA would become 3rd Freezer, and homeward bound with full cargo of chilled and frozen meat the 3 freezers would resort to regular watch-keeping.
I spent 2 years on the Deseado during which time I did 2 voyages as 2nd freezer keeping the 8 - 12 watch homeward bound and on days outward bound.
My first trip as 2nd freezer was a disaster, the Chief freezer was new to the ship and proved to be a drinker and socializer, and spent little time showing me the ropes, especially on how and when to defrost.
Homeward bound the Chief spent little time keeping his watch and it was left to me and the 3rd, also on his first trip as freezer, to try and keep things going. Unfortunately our inexperience was costly and temperatures went all to hell. Swear to God when they unloaded the cargo in London some of the carcasses were walking off on their own. Lost about half the cargo.
Chief freezer was canned but the 3rd and I did the next voyage with a new more experienced Chief. Don't think that bad cargo voyage hurt my reputation as after my second trip as freezer I was promoted to Junior 3rd Engineer on the Deseado.
 

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I did two trips working in the Freezer Department. First as a Junior Engineer on Shaw Savill's Corinthic and then as 2nd Freezer on the Cretic. I found it a bit boring and went back into the Engine Room.

However on the coast the 16 on 32 off watches were good for the socializing part of my sea going career.
Hi. We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos on the SS Corinthic and developed an asbestos related condition. Are you able to assist?
 

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SS Corinthic

Did anyone work on the SS Corinthic? We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos, and sadly died as a result. We are looking for anyone who was on the Corinthic between 1954 and 1957. Look forward to hearing from you.
 

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As an engineer cadet with Blu Flu we all spent time during our apprenticeship working alongside personel from SG Dobsons refrigeration engineers from Wallasey.Stan Dobson was a great bloke with a wealth of refrigeration and his second in command Mr Tiplady(tip)All of Tips gear went into the back of an old Morris Minor Traveller which amazingly never seemed to break down despite the weight of said gear.Happy days.
 

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Did anyone work on the SS Corinthic? We act for the family of a gentleman who was exposed to asbestos, and sadly died as a result. We are looking for anyone who was on the Corinthic between 1954 and 1957. Look forward to hearing from you.
I sailed in Shaw Savill's Corinthic from October 1964 until February 1966, initially as 3rd Engineer then 2nd Engineer. Raybnz (post #70 ) was also on board for some of that time.
I was diagnosed as suffering from asbestosis a few years ago and my solicitors made a successful claim against Shaw Savill's insurers.
Please send a private message and tell me what information you require to make a claim on behalf of your client. I will be pleased to help
 

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Refrigeration Engineer

Our client sailed on the following ships during the following periods:

SS Himalaya Feb 1953 - Sept 1953
TEV Queen of Bermuda Oct 1953-Dec 1954
MV Nottingham Sept 1954 - June 1955
SS Corinthic Sept 1955-Oct 1956
MV Cedric March 1957-Jan 1958
MV Canopic March 1958
Southern Cross 1958

Did you or anyone you know sail on any of these ships at that time.

We look forward to hearing from you.
 

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Ian! Your "footnote" re "the rain getting in".

You don't think it's anything to do with the damage CFC's have done-----do you(*)). Salaams, Phil(Hippy)
Ah yes, could be...we would loose literally tons of R22 each voyage...
 

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Our client sailed on the following ships during the following periods:

SS Himalaya Feb 1953 - Sept 1953
TEV Queen of Bermuda Oct 1953-Dec 1954
MV Nottingham Sept 1954 - June 1955
SS Corinthic Sept 1955-Oct 1956
MV Cedric March 1957-Jan 1958
MV Canopic March 1958
Southern Cross 1958

Did you or anyone you know sail on any of these ships at that time.



We look forward to hearing from you.
I am in Australia and my husband died of Mesothelioma but prior to his death he had a claim in UK USA and Australia. I still get funds form the USA from different trusts when they pay out. He got a disability pension and a very good one from the UK until he passed and had a large settlement in Australia. Ryan Carlisle did our case

As it stands here it does not matter who people work for its the diagnosis of mesothelioma that is the key.
 

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One of the "wild" boats I sailed on (can't remember which one) picked up frozen lamb in (you've guessed it) NZ, bound for Japan. They had side doors to allow the fork lifts to drive straight in. On completing the loading, said doors were shut and off we went. Now my memory is a bit woolly, but I think it was Aukland. We hit a bit of "sleeping weather" straight away, with the waves coming on the starboard bow (I'm an engineer). Anyway, sometime during the night, the frosty got an alarm from his temperature sensors. Apparently this was quite usual so ignored it until the morning. When he checked, it was genuine and the temp. was high. Further checking, with me taking my shoes off and crawling over the cargo resulted in me hearing a nice "sloshing" sound. The starboard door seal was leaking water in to the hold. About turn and back to Aukland. The cargo was transferred to another hatch. An oil drum was filled with brine and a pump and lance on the end of a hose used to chop out the frozen water in the air space.This was done by the officers as the crew wouldn't touch it. Everything was sorted, the door seal fixed and off we went.
Now I'm not sure of the authenticity of the rest, but apparently I think the crew had a dislike of the mate. Don't know why as he was a great bloke, played the chair sax i believe. They wrote a letter to the union informing them that they had told the mate that the wasn't properly fitted. It was signed by all even the first trip galley
boy.Apparently the union took one look and decided that in essence they had accused the captain of taking an unseaworthy ship out. It would appear that the crew hadn't realised the seriousness of their insinuations. I think the mate was flown home and various committees attended.
As far as I know, the BOT or whoever decided that the letter was a malicious one and no further action was taken.
I must admit, if it had been me the solicitors would have been taking the crew members apart one by one, stripping their bank accounts.
If anybody knows the exact details, please contradict me if I'm wrong.
Regards and be safe at this time.
 

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Those side doors on the later Reefer ships were Banana Doors for loading by hand at places like Guyaquilla, were labour was cheap. They used to put wooden planks up to the doors with slats on and the ship would be loaded by the locals with 2-3 boxes of bananas on one of their shoulders, it was a like 2 streams of ants at each door. The ship went down bodily on an even keel. Perhaps a 3 day load working round the clock.

I would have thought fork lift trucks loaded with pallet loads of lamb would have damaged the special wooded gratings (warkause or something) on reefer ship holds. Loaders like at Bluff , cranes and derricks would have been far quicker, as it was open stow, just stacked up by the wharfies. Head room would have been a problem in the tween decks.
 

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Scythia, late 70,s chief mates retirement voyage - insistant there would be NO pilferage from mixed fruit cargo, all the nice stuff, grapes oranges, etc. Oddly enough Brit crew saw this as a challenge and within 2 days deck dept had run out of padlocks for booby hatches. One access hatch was located in crew cross alleyway. So loss of cargo larger than normal!
Same vessel, chief reefer was old guy who was up at 4am,down cargo holds logging temps etc. 2nd frosty was qualified reefer engineer from Dobsons. When he took over as chief, he merely clicked all the settings on the control panel and said I'll be in the bar. He had spent his couple of weeks as second frosty making sure all the automation worked and was quite happy with it, wheras older guy did not understand it!
Dannic
 

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Refrigeration engineers

After a year on this site I have never come across a post by a refrigeration engineer mariner. There are posts from Captains, Mates, Radio officers, Medical staff, Engineers, Electricians, Boy, Ordinary and Able seamen, Bosuns, Greasers, motormen, Firemen, Trimmers, Cooks and Stewards to name a few but apart from myself no one has posted a thread about frozen cargo stories.
Where are all the J & E Hall men that came from Darby and Dartford plus other sources to serve on the hundreds of ships that carried the frozen meat, dairy and fruit cargoes from Australia, NZ, SA/Argentine and the West Indies all the way back to Britain?
Surely there must have been a few tales worth telling, lost or rotting cargoes or what ever
I did a round trip NZ/UK/NZ as a third freezer and it was the cushiest job I ever had. I must write about it some time.

Bob
 
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