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Quite right......I only sailed on her for 7 months to finish my sea time for 2nd Mates, will never forget the ship and the good times I had onboard.
 

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Emails between old shipmates
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“Now I sure do remember John Auld, I cannot recall anyone ever saying a bad word about him, I am afraid the same cannot be said for me. Any Mariner who had the privilege to know, better still, to have sailed with him knew he was one of the very best, the ultimate shipmate to have on any voyage bound for foreign parts. He was such good company, both socially and professionally competent.”

If I remember, his first trip was on the Kenuta in about January 1954, he’d later sailed on the ‘Mar’ (Reina Del Mar, not the Pacifico) as a cadet. The chief officer was Jim Bruce, now in a shore job, happily married and living in Quebec City. Jim had invited me to lunch, suggesting I bring any off-duty officers along. What a shock our hosts got when they recognised John from those earlier years on the ‘Mar’. Anyhow, we had a brilliant afternoon.

Apparently back then, just before Fidel Castro took over Cuba, John was a cadet on the final leg of the trip from Havana to Cadiz. Not only had some younger female members of the returning National French Ballet been charmed by his winsome way, but more than one older chaperone and a first trip female purser/writer. (Not many young ladies crewing merchant ships in those days.). One of these ladies in her disappointment complained to the Chief Officer. He decided John’s success/popularity with the ladies was getting out of hand and could affect his own chances with the first tripper, who later became his wife.
He was in a position to have John transferred to a cargo ship, and did so.
 

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I posted the following on another thread about the Reina Del Mar but this one seems more approapriate. (still getting used to the new format of this website - having not been on for several months). But I bought a cine film from ebay which I digitally converted of the Reina Del Mar and uploaded to my YouTube Channel - Capspread

Reina Del Mar approaches Southampton and other liners can be seen in the distance alongside. A couple of Ferries are also seen plus a cargo ship.

But the video is here:

 

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Actually, cruising in the Med & northern Europe in the northern summer, then from South Africa in the northern winter - 2 or 3 from Cape Town to South America, and maybe a couple to the Indian Ocean islands from Durban.

Attached a pic of her departing Cape Town on 25 June 1975 for Taiwan. She was in for bunkers and berthed well away from the normal cargo berths to stop visitors - her presence was not publicised.

A sad occasion.
I was onboard when this photo was taken I was aft as part of the deck crew we thought we may be going to F berth but plans were changed there was a few visitors came aboard they might have come from the Cape Town office to say farewell
 

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Actually, cruising in the Med & northern Europe in the northern summer, then from South Africa in the northern winter - 2 or 3 from Cape Town to South America, and maybe a couple to the Indian Ocean islands from Durban.

Attached a pic of her departing Cape Town on 25 June 1975 for Taiwan. She was in for bunkers and berthed well away from the normal cargo berths to stop visitors - her presence was not publicised.

A sad occasion.
Was there at the time back aft as part of the deck crew we thought we were going to F berth but ended up being tucked away,was in charge of fulling up the the water tanks with the bosun giving a hand a few people did come aboard I think from the office to say farewell and maybe some momento,s
 

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Ahoy,
This is what "Merchant Ships 1956" says:
REINA DE MAR,20,225 tons gross.This new passenger liner, built for the PSNC by Harland & Wolff Ltd.,Belfast,has joined the REINA DEL PACIFICO to maintain the service from the UK,France and Spain to Bermuda,the Bahamas,Cuba,Jamaica,Panama,Colombia,Ecuador,Peru and Chili, and augmented service enables calls at Trinidad and in Venezuela to be added. The REINA DEL MAR ia a twin-screw turbine ship with a lenght o.a 600 ft. 7in,lenght b.p. 560 ft.,breadth moulded 78 ft.,depth moulded to C deck 44 ft,draught 30 ft. In appearence the ship is graceful and has the modern tapered funnel for keeping the smoke clear of the decks. The hull is largely riveted,though butts are welded, and welding has been extensively used inside the ship.
In common with ther new passenger vessels she is fitted with Denny-Brown stabilizers. The propelling machinery consists of a two-shaft arrangement of Parson' double-reduction geared turbines,having a total power in service of 17,000 s.h.p,with propeller revolutions of 112 per minute. Stean at 525lb per sq. in. pressure and 825 degree F. temperature is generated in two water boiler made by the builders to Babcock & Wilcox controlled-superheat three-drum design, The REINA DEL MAR does not reflect the modern tendency towards a one- or two class ship, as she is desigbed for the South American trade where there remains a demand for the conventional three classes. Well-to-do South Americans expect and are prepared to pay for the best possible accommodation and service, and the ship provides for 207 first class passengers. I n the cabin class there is accommodation for 216 passengers in single, tw, three, four-berth rooms. The 343 tourist class passengers are provided for in cabins with one to six berths, and consist largely of emigrants when first leavinf Europe and other returning to re-visit it. A feature of this modern three-class ship is that in effect there is a move up for all three classes,the first class becoming "de luxe", the second class becoming first. and the third class is better than the second class accommodation in older ships. Air condition covers the whole of the passenger accommodation. In addition to passenger accommodation the REINA DEL MAR has a total of 6,000 tons for cargo in five holds. The outward cargo is mostly of manufacturers' goods, but much of the homeward cargo consists of heavy commodities such as metal ores. There are insulated cargo spaces in No. 4 tunnel and lower tweendecks.
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Hope this will clear things regarding the replies,here also added a [HR available] scan of the ships plan,btw Gianpaulo's aka Tanker posted in 2005, picture was a scan from the same booklet.
Water Rectangle Product Slope Font
 
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