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In the 1960s Clan Line built, I think it was 4 or 5 ships which had RR generators. They were mounted in the middles, ran at around 1800 revs (I think)

They did not in theory require any maintenance, apart from oil and water topping up if required. Bendix type electric starters were used. Above them was mounted a monorail which exited, via a removable plate in the after engine room bulkhead, into a cargo hold

The theory was that after so many hours they would be exchange for one which had been previously overhauled.

I only stood by one, but I did see the engine room serang prising the bits out of the acoustic barrier after one ran to destruction. The accident report was very brief., along the lines of "I was in the control room, pressed the starter button then watched the revs come up to normal, then off the scale, then drop to zero"

Were they ever brought into general use?
 

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The Uiterwyk reefers (Polar this and that) had had them early on. All that was left of them was two (?)of their alternators which doubled as a BLM for the Siemens shaft generator system. Those and the rails from which the lead curtains which had been installed to catch the higher velocity pieces of scrap into which the engines converted themselves on regular intervals. E-S will tell us of the EM D/A on the Texaco Denmark but I would have no idea if of the same mark although I am fairly sure they were of the same 'Marque'.
 

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Oh it was a Rolls Royce alright and we engineers were ever so proud of it. A Merlin on our ship.
But a Merlin it was not, if ours had been fitted in a Spitfire wir würden heute Abend alle Deutsch sprechen.

And Varley would be striding around Douglas in a fetching pair of Lederhosen.
 

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In the 1960s Clan Line built, I think it was 4 or 5 ships which had RR generators. They were mounted in the middles, ran at around 1800 revs (I think)

They did not in theory require any maintenance, apart from oil and water topping up if required. Bendix type electric starters were used. Above them was mounted a monorail which exited, via a removable plate in the after engine room bulkhead, into a cargo hold

The theory was that after so many hours they would be exchange for one which had been previously overhauled.

I only stood by one, but I did see the engine room serang prising the bits out of the acoustic barrier after one ran to destruction. The accident report was very brief., along the lines of "I was in the control room, pressed the starter button then watched the revs come up to normal, then off the scale, then drop to zero"

Were they ever brought into general use?
We had them as 2 x auxiliary generators (about 450kW each?) on the ACT 1 class of steam container ships in 1970. I had an injector blow out of the head and fill the generator flat with diesel mist. Fortunately I had just put my *** out before opening the generator flat door to investigate the issue of one of them loosing power(Smoke)
I seem to recall that someone told me the engines were originally designed for the Centurion tank. If true, it's a good job we never have to rely on them to defend the UK(EEK)
 

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We had them as 2 x auxiliary generators (about 450kW each?) on the ACT 1 class of steam container ships in 1970. I had an injector blow out of the head and fill the generator flat with diesel mist. Fortunately I had just put my *** out before opening the generator flat door to investigate the issue of one of them loosing power(Smoke)
I seem to recall that someone told me the engines were originally designed for the Centurion tank. If true, it's a good job we never have to rely on them to defend the UK(EEK)[/QUOTE
I sem to remember them fitted to Atlantic Causeway and Conveyor - G2 Roro container ship around 1969.

Howard
 

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In the 1960s Clan Line built, I think it was 4 or 5 ships which had RR generators. They were mounted in the middles, ran at around 1800 revs (I think)

They did not in theory require any maintenance, apart from oil and water topping up if required. Bendix type electric starters were used. Above them was mounted a monorail which exited, via a removable plate in the after engine room bulkhead, into a cargo hold

The theory was that after so many hours they would be exchange for one which had been previously overhauled.

I only stood by one, but I did see the engine room serang prising the bits out of the acoustic barrier after one ran to destruction. The accident report was very brief., along the lines of "I was in the control room, pressed the starter button then watched the revs come up to normal, then off the scale, then drop to zero"

Were they ever brought into general use?
Port Chalmers & Caroline had 5 DV8 Rolls Royce V8 DGens, 1800 rpm which was max revs to get 60 Hertz. No flywheel, close coupled to alternator, no indicator cocks, individual coolers. Cramped into a large engineroom and third engineers nightmare. Original intent was every time back in UK 1 engine would be exchanged but understandably in the early 70's that didn't happen. So lifted up on deck if weather good or down No.7 hatch to do overhauls.
Atlantic Conveyor, emergency diesels were 2 x straight 8 RR.

Dannic
 

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Brocklebanks had the first RR generator on one of our steam ships . Then Mahout and Markor both were fitted with RR Generatos as new builds > I found them very good . Derek
 

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Yes Mahout, Markor and the Cunard mickey mouse boats all had RR generators. Just needed looking after with very regular oil changes ,only downside was the cooling stack needed regular cleaning when in Calcutta and similar locations.
 

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Oh it was a Rolls Royce alright and we engineers were ever so proud of it. A Merlin on our ship.
But a Merlin it was not, if ours had been fitted in a Spitfire wir würden heute Abend alle Deutsch sprechen.

And Varley would be striding around Douglas in a fetching pair of Lederhosen.
Something like:
 

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Fix the second step down or, "Humbly ask the Heavenly Father to remove my shortcomings", otherwise 'embrace humility'? I think you would agree that without my shortcomings your eye would have been distracted from the step by my gaily decorated undercomings.
 

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Note guest eyes already distracted away from offending “shortcomings”. Perhaps would advise he be offered some of that Riesling you’re chugging, in case “gaily decorated undercomings” come into view.
Whatever - suggest timely fix of second step down. (Then maybe Step 8 not reqd).
 

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Port Chalmers & Caroline had 5 DV8 Rolls Royce V8 DGens, 1800 rpm which was max revs to get 60 Hertz. No flywheel, close coupled to alternator, no indicator cocks, individual coolers. Cramped into a large engineroom and third engineers nightmare. Original intent was every time back in UK 1 engine would be exchanged but understandably in the early 70's that didn't happen. So lifted up on deck if weather good or down No.7 hatch to do overhauls.
Atlantic Conveyor, emergency diesels were 2 x straight 8 RR.

Dannic
Atlantic Causeway also had 2 emergency RR diesel generators.

Howard
 

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I "fondly" remember the RR generators on the Manipur ex Cunard Ivernia. As you said John G. needing constant attention. How many did we lose in the States, before we sailed along with the Chief Engineer. Power wise they where not bad, I had one continue to make power with a rod flapping out on the crankcase, before it shut down on loss of oil pressure,but that's another story.
Cheers,
Nick Jones.
 

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The Danish class has RR emergency alternators up on the old man's deck {"D" deck I think], on my first trip the RR alternator had 86 running hours on the clock, when we went to dry dock in May {I think} the roller was used as shore side power and we all stayed on board.
 

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The Danish Class were a bit troublesome but less so than the Hamburg Class, which were really Shell M Class.
A story about the Denmark from an old shipmate;
from Jim Smith Engineer Officer "
On a nice sunny early May day 1972 in Lisbon in the company of a number of well refreshed engineers we proceeded to join this vessel. As we neared the vessel low and behold we could see a great yellow monster astride the poop. It had four stubby legs and a long silver snout, it was being held in position by great wires. A huge lead came from the aft accommodation and also held the monster. A quick pull on the hipflasks and we could see the legendary words on the monster K O N G. A surge of excitement went through us, they had caught the legendary King Kong of movie fame, albeit it was not big and hairy, but yellow with a long snout was fine.

"We had visions of cruising the African coast exhibiting the monster, what money we would make, permanently overflowing hipflasks, a lady or two and other nice things. As we neared the vessel we could make out further writing on the monster "Kongsberg Gas Turbines" it said,what a let down.

"We got aboard the vessel and met the other engineers who were leaving in a hurry. They muttered words concerning spacial turbo alternators, which in our condition meant new technology afoot.
No wonder men of our calibre had been specially selected to join this vessel, it said so on the letter.

"We got down below agog to see this new alternator and Tommy Copeland 2nd Engineer directed us to it. It was a bloody big empty space. Tommy said we don't have any trouble with it, its the only thing on the ship we don't have any trouble with. It does not give out much power as its in a parallel universe. I started to worry about this vessel.

"Tommy asked if any of us had motor qualifications and I foolishly said I had a class 2 motor and I had been on motor ships in Blue Funnel. He turned me around and there was a banging abortion, The Headless Moron. I started to worry more about this vessel. We were set for a horror story King Kong vs The Headless Moron with us in between. Tommy had a direct approach to engine room management and he said if you have a motor ticket you must know about gas turbines. I will give you the book and you can get on to King Kong in the morning. You look like a fine sober engineer. I was about to dispute these matters when Tommy mentioned he had a bottle or two of four bells and a case of cold ones in his cabin. I decided to postpone any dispute and told him he dripped common sense.

"When I awakened in the morning we were in the middle of the ocean. I went out to inspect King Kong in the cold light of day, I did not like what I saw. It was a great yellow tin box on two axles with four wheels, it had a towing mechanism, over run braking and was restrained on the deck with shaped plating to contour the wheels. It was wired down. A large cable tray was positioned between the box and the aft accommodation with the power and control cables. Central heating piping ran water to a lube oil cooler about the size of my w-lly. I was now distinctly worried about this vessel.
On consulting the tome I was astounded to discover the machine was for Arctic use only.

"All the lights went out and some one in the engine room run up King Kong, I run up as well, up the bloody deck, past the manifold and took cover behind the windlass. With the whining and screaminig I thought I was being chased. With King Kong running the poop deck was like a Heathrow runway.

"As I approached aft on my way back a message came that Tommy wanted me on the Hedemora, it had collapsed. I thought what have I got myself into..."
 

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You will note that none of these tales of woe are plumbing and not battery stacking. I can believe you have recognised the benefit of braces and probably of a belt or two as well.
 

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Yes Mahout, Markor and the Cunard mickey mouse boats all had RR generators. Just needed looking after with very regular oil changes ,only downside was the cooling stack needed regular cleaning when in Calcutta and similar locations.
Going up to Calcutta was a problem and we had the 2 Chinese fitters stand by and clean the duplex sea water filters fitted on each generator on a regular basis to prevent overheating . The filter mesh was very fine as the cooler stack tubes were of small diameter .
The worst problem was when at anchor in Calcutta at dusk and dawn the shrimps would rise up towards the surface and the duplex filters had to be continually cleaned for about an hour ; as soon as one was cleaned and put back in service the other had to be opened up and cleaned with an air hose to blow out the tiny shrimps ; quite a pile after about an hour ( had to be cleaned up right away or an awfull stink of rotting shrimp in the hot generator flat .

To prevent potential black outs while navigating the Hoogly one of our Chief Engineers ; Bill Sherett can up with a great solution which worked perfectly . While in Cal we had a pipe fitted to the swimming pool drain line overboard with suitable valves . The procedure was to fill the swimming pool with clean water before navigating up to Cal
or down from Cal and when it was shrimp time or a lot of debris in the cooling water the Auxiliary salt water cooling was shut off and the valves opened to let the swimming pool water gravitate down through the coolers . Worked perfectly with the adequate pressure head from the pool and as I recollect we had enough in the swimming pool to last for about 6 hours.

Magic Derek
 
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