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Kiwi,
An astute analysis with which I concur. I believe, and this from a "family" tradition person, that all went out of the window when it stopped being Holts or China Steam and became "Ocean Transport & Trading" with the sea side becoming "Ocean Fleets". Maybe I was too young to realize it then.......! Well, I was just a pimply faced 17 year old Eng Cadet in 1980!! Looking back, I expected more and didn't find it.

Thx and Rgds.
Dave
 

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I think that honour goes to a Middy called Safi-el-Din (son of a Suez canal pilot). Spent most of his time in port exercising his equipment which reached to just short of his knee. :)
my guess it might be Safi Samil , same connection (no chain locker ), lived at Aulis while taking his 2nd mates in 1966 but spent most of his time near by in a towerblock. He often complained that "she" just wouldn't leave him alone.(Thumb)
 

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Sailing Day
Panic in the restaurant,no fixed seats, the longer you could keep your table occupied the better. From Liverpool we had all been for a final bevvie, Cunard men used the Stile House CPR frequented the Pig & Whistle
 

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sailing days

sow-sow-la,where was i when all this palava was going on? i did 21 trips deep sea with B.F.as ab ls, and i didn,t see any of this. i just signed on got aboard got my cabin,my bed linen,met up with the rest of the deckies,and "socialised",till it was time for stations.i think the bosun would come round with the watch list.we just made the most of our last few hours,and i enjoyed every trip regards yorkie meekin
 

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Exactly my experience John. It tended to be a bit quiet, most people lost in their own thoughts. My main concern was trying to nab the bottom bunk.
Pat
 

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Jeepers!

Sailing Day again!

A sailing-day soogee and scrub-down
Was a helluva start to a cruise,
After all the wine and women,
And not to mention the booze!

Generally a dreadful experience for all hands, required to make things shipshape after some time languishing alongside in port, with all the cleaning, checking and double checking necessary (long before any such nonsense as a thing called a "check-list" or a "risk assessment"), done and dusted by rote; and we got to sea. And we survived and made good.

The details - the bridge, the engine room, the deck and the galley - are too well remembered to require any recitation here.

We followed our fathers, wearing trousers made of blue sky in the morning. We knew that we were doing everything which was right and proper and we knew bugger all else. Most of us still know bugger all else. Anything else which I might have learned in the intervening sixty years (almost) takes second place to the things known to have been right and proper on sailing day.

Would I do it all again? I'm afraid so.

PS

As an apprentice in pilotage I rose through the ranks and in due course became bosun aboard a sea-keeping pilot-cutter, at sea for two weeks at a time. I learned the philosophy (I doubt that it was my own) that nothing should be cleaner than a ship at sea.

I had listened to my father (who underwent a similar experience before me) and tried my best to remember the things which he had taught me. I developed thoughts of my own and was grateful that, many years later, my Dad and I could chew the fat as equals (although the old bastard would never admit that he might ever have been wrong).

Yes, I would do it again.

PPS

Later I became a Senior First Class Pilot, but that is a different story altogether.
 
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