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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wonder if anyone can help me identify this ship. It is an image painted on a ceramic soup tureen
Going by the ensign, it was part of the German Imperial Navy and I thought it might have been one of the Bremen or Gazelle class ships.
I would really appreciate any help with this as it’s a mystery I’m struggling to solve.
Boat Watercraft Water Vehicle Naval architecture
 

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I wonder if anyone can help me identify this ship. It is an image painted on a ceramic soup tureen
Going by the ensign, it was part of the German Imperial Navy and I thought it might have been one of the Bremen or Gazelle class ships.
I would really appreciate any help with this as it’s a mystery I’m struggling to solve. View attachment 691887
I wonder if anyone can help me identify this ship. It is an image painted on a ceramic soup tureen
Going by the ensign, it was part of the German Imperial Navy and I thought it might have been one of the Bremen or Gazelle class ships.
I would really appreciate any help with this as it’s a mystery I’m struggling to solve. View attachment 691887
This was an auxiliary ship of the German Imperial Navy and served as yacht for the kaiser.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both so much. I’ve also learnt that the serving dish it’s painted on was called a ‘Kaiser Cup’ a souvenir of British Aristocracy travels in Europe since the Kaiser was related to the King.
 

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SDenn

A bit more for the. Cup. Your information for Kaiser Cup was way off. The 'Kaiser's Cup' was a yachting race trophy!

More later on the painting itself.

Stephen



Kaiser's Cup
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Kaiser's Cup was a yachting race across the Atlantic between Sandy Hook, New Jersey (USA) and The Lizard (Cornwall, England). This was a famous sailing race of the day, and was won by the yacht Atlantic which held the record for nearly a century[1][2]
In 1905 out of eleven contenders, it was won by the yacht Atlantic, which set a time record for the crossing the Atlantic ocean. The race was the subject of the 1905 silent film Start of Ocean Race for Kaiser's Cup, and the book, Atlantic: The Last Great Race of Princes. Second place was won by the yacht Hamburg. Third place went to the RSY Valhalla who despite being by far the largest participant, came in a respectable ‘’easy third’’. She crossed the Atlantic under sail in 14 days and 2 hours.[3]
The yacht Atlantic won the race with a time of 12 days and 4 hours.[4] News of the race was published in the New York Times and the London Times newspapers.[4] A report of the race was also published in the Los Angeles Herald newspaper.[5]
The Imperial German cruiser Pfeil greeted the competitors at the end of the race, and the yachts crossed between land and the ship.[5] The Atlantic was captained by Charlie Barr and directed by navigator and tactician Frederick Maxfield Hoyt, who also helped design her[6] and was sailed to victory with a clear lead and the next contender did not come in for another day.[5][7] This was roughly a 3000 nautical mile race, and Atlantic had averaged about 10 knots across the ocean.[7] The record for sailing monohull on this route stood until 2002.[7]
Some of the back history of this type of racing go back to the 1860s, when some sailing yacht clubs raced across the Atlantic ocean.[5] So this kind of thing had some popularity, and yacht racing was also popular among European heads of state.[5] In this case, the Kaiser of Germany wanted to sponsor a race of this type and his entry would be the yacht Hamburg (previously known as Rainbow).[5] He put no restrictions size, rigging, and there was no handicap either.[5] In this type of racing, it was done by a yacht and crew sponsored by the patron and they did not necessarily go on the voyage, rather their boats and ship crews were competed against each other.[5] The yachts were not necessarily stripped down racers, but they were racing their yachts; one contender had amenities such as a grand piano with a dining room for 30, and fireplaces.[5] Even the Atlantic, which was commissioned in 1903 was intended for taking the owner for trips around Europe- fast but also well equipped with steam heating and refrigeration, steam-powered winches, a mahogany interior, and three interior bathrooms supporting a crew of about 40.[8]
 

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Re SMY HOHENZOLLERN II. This vessel was built as the Kaiser's yacht. She is not part of the Gazelle or Bremen class vessel. From photos etc there are similar features, but that is just because the yacht and the cruisers were ordered from the German's navy.

The painting you have shown is likely by German marine artist Willy Stower.... 99.99% correct. Stower was a pal of the Kaiser. He did many paintings of the Kaiser's yachts as well as other naval vessels. Stower sailed in the yachts and also painted the Kaiser himself.

The tureen is a fine example of his work.

Stephen
 
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