Ships Nostalgia banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,034 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever worked on the so called "ships of shame", the ones that carry live sheep etc around the world?

I have seen media reports of the conditions on these ships and was wondering if things are really as barbaric as the media presents them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
thunderd said:
Has anyone ever worked on the so called "ships of shame", the ones that carry live sheep etc around the world?

I have seen media reports of the conditions on these ships and was wondering if things are really as barbaric as the media presents them.
Derek
If you put in a search for SHIPMENTS OF LIVESTOCK at the top of the page (search forum's) Zelda started a forum on this subject a short while ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
It looks like the majority of info in this thread has disappeared.
I posted some nice pictures of the loading of sheep in Fremantle.
Can one of the moderators please inform where this went??
Jan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have watched sheep and cattle being loaded onto the rusty crap heaps which will take the poor little buggers to a death we just cannot imagine--all in the name of greed and money. The LIVE TRADE SHOULD BE BANNED NOW!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,439 Posts
Dexter said:
I have watched sheep and cattle being loaded onto the rusty crap heaps which will take the poor little buggers to a death we just cannot imagine--all in the name of greed and money. The LIVE TRADE SHOULD BE BANNED NOW!
Wow, that's a bit generalistic. Whilst I dare say there are some cowboys (excuse the pun), as in all shipping trades, Dutch owner Vroon has a very good reputation for livestock transport. I wouldn't call it greed and money either, more like simple supply and demand.

Phil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
This is getting a little hot, But I for one can not understand why the animals can not be slaughtered here (uk) and then frozen and shipped.

Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
I am not sure whether sensative issues like this should be discussed in this forum as how far do you go?
Have you ever thought the life of that chicken before you bought the frozen
part in the supermarket, mostly such chickens never felt proper soil or grass and yet you line up at KFC without thinking.

Anyway sticking to the subject, then I can only confirm what Phil is saying.
I inspected many livestock carriers and some have 7 or more levels of cargoholds, yes I crawled from one to the other, taking hours/days and must say that Vroon, and also others, do their utmost to keep the ships in top condition and of course I have also seen some badly maintained ships, like you have them with other cargoes.

There has been arguments about this topic earlier but that thread has been removed by the administrator ( I expect).
Yet I started the thread again - special purpose vessels - cormo express-, here also I state that these vessels are kept in excellent shape.
Jan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
382 Posts
Once took a dozen Calves down to BA for breeding purposes they where carried on deck & if my memory serves me where better looked after than the crew
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
All,
we carried 3000 sheep on deck from Freemantle to Singapore - the vessel was a General cargo ship with derricks.
Shepherds were suppsed to be employed but the voyage was made without them. The cadets, 4 of us, worked 12 hour shifts watering feeding and generally patrolling for the well being of the sheep.
We looked after them the best we could but I am sure some of them did not get enough food or water. We did the best we could but it was not a perfect passage. I remember having to put overboard 1 or 2 when they died.

I can still see them now.
As a matter of interest we got £20 bonus each for the trip.

I still eat lamb and mutton though
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,304 Posts
Ships of Shame

As a lowly 3/0 I once, unwillingly, had to look after a tiger. The nasty tempered blighter was fed better than I was!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,927 Posts
As a lowly 3/0 I once, unwillingly, had to look after a tiger. The nasty tempered blighter was fed better than I was!
On a rather lighter note perhaps. A whale tranport calling at the Cape to refuel and take provisions en route to South Georgia shipped a load of pigs for the Island breakfast tables. An A.B. was appointed by the mate as cattleman to look after them. He was instructed by the mate to be sure he wore a hat when in the pen. On asking why ?, the mate replied "so we can identify you". The A.B. was rather plump and not exactly handsome.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
968 Posts
In 1961 Royal Mails' "Pardo" carried 7 cows and a huge bull(all Herefords) to Brasil.The two cadets were paid 5 bob(25p) a day extra to look after them.We returned with a cargo of corned beef!! Regards Arch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,762 Posts
These animals are carried live and slaughtered in their buyers religious customs.
i.e. jews muslims hindu's etc.
They will not accept frozen animals as they have to met their religious beliefs.
I do believe that this has been observed in some countries hence they ship frozen animals.
As an aside I was on a ship that took live horses to Europe so they could be slaughtered and sold for their meat.
If you have a weak stomach or are concerned about how animals are treated before slaughter become a vegitarian or maybe cabbage sqeek!!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
0 Posts
It seems strange to me that we have regulations for the "humane" slaughter of animals and then allow those regulations to be broken in the name of some religion or another. It doesn't make economic sense to cart life animals around the cost of feeding and high stowage factor are far more than refrigeration.
When I was a cadet in the Cape York we used to carry sheep on deck for Xmas Island the cadets used to get 10/- a day for feeding and watering them. I realise now that we were only doing this so that they could be ritually slaughtered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
987 Posts
As I posted on the previous thread on this topic, my understanding is that a large part of the reason for shipping the animals live is that many poorer parts of the world do not have the refrigeration necessary to cope with frozen meat in large quantities. Australia has been a participant in the trade and it has caused much controversey here. I have an open mind on the topic, provided the ships are appropriately designed and equipped, and adequate provision made for their care, I can't really see how this differs from any other type of animal transportation and slaughter. As someone else has already mentioned it would not do to inquire too deeply as to the lifestyle satisfaction of any animal remains that you purchase in your local supermarket; so unless one is an organic vegan, and they have their own questions to answer, best to keep out of this argument.
CBoots
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
I am sure, in any event, that these animals are better looked after than those when the SS Suffolk was lost in 1886; they were kept on deck; and when she struck the coast at the Lizard, they were left on board; eventually they were washed overboard by massive seas, and left to fend for themselves, and eventually being drowned or severely maimed on the rocks, and left to die a horrible slow painful death; thankfully one gentleman broke the laws of the time and shot them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
94 Posts
livestock carrier

For my sins I was sent, as 2/O in May 1979, to join the "Farid Fares" which ended her days ablaze somewhere in the Indian Ocean. She was a 5 hatch midships accomodation cargo liner originally called the "Lions Gate" I think she was Swedish built around 1957 and was on her way to be scrapped when she was bought and converted into a sheep carrier.

In her day she was a beautiful vessel, lovely lines, twin engine, twin screw and good sea keeping in heavy weather. As officers we had the passenger accomodation which meant we each had our own bathroom complete with bath! The interior was wooden bulkheads, false fireplaces etc and there was even the plinth and glass dome where, it was said, the ticker tape machine was situated.

The ship's crew had the officers accomadation, all midships, and the shepherds where housed in the crew quarters aft. Despite the accomodation the conditions were not that great considering we were in the Gulf in June/July/August without and A/C and surrounded by wool.

The whole business of transporting the sheep was not for the faint hearted. It could take up to 4 days to load the 45,000 sheep into pens that were average about 20' x 20', some much bigger and some much smaller. The pens were about 3'6" in height and floored with fiberglass. Each set of pens could be connected by portable 'bridges' to allow the ship to cross from one set of pens to another. The shepherds came from Pakistan and were skilled at sheep handling and being able to get them to go where we wanted.

About 2/3rds of the sheep were below deck with the rest above deck. Below decks ventilation was provided by large fans, those above deck relied on any passing breeze. On loading the sheep were fed dried grass pellets and water which had to be manhandled to the troughs that were attached to the bars of the pens. The stronger or more wiley sheep would stay by the troughs throughout the entire voyage.

The sheep stood the whole way. Any that lay down or that had fallen were in danger of being trampled upon. The sheep's waste eventually dried and allowed a softer and usually less slippery surface to stand on. The head stockman was from Argentina, a very plesent chap called Carlos whose job it was to go round every day with a long pole and poke any sheep that were not standing and if they didn't get up they had usually died. The sheep would usually start to die after day 4 or 5 of our 15 day voyage from Fremantle to Bandhar Khomaine(?) ex Shapur). The number of deaths usually peaked about day 12 and it was common on this particular ship to loose about 4,000 each voyage.

As it was high summer discharge was done from 1900hrs right through to 0700hrs when the temperature was cool.

On the return voyage and once clear of the coast any bodies remaining on deck were heaved over the side and the process of cleaning the ship began. It was recokened that over 200 tonnes of sheep waste was hosed, brushed, scrubbed and pumped into the sea. The entire inside of the cargo holds were repainted and on arrival off Fremantle we had to wait for the inspector to come out to pass the ship clean before being allowed to enter the harbour. Once alongside the ship's complement had to leave the ship while it was fumigated, accomadation included. This provided a great excuse to visit the local mission but we had to stay in one room for the duration as our clothes reeked.

I understand that in 1980 the ship caught fire when fully laden and was abandoned with the loss of 2 of the shepherds and all the sheep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
Quite a story.
Rached Fares (Fremantle) was an exporter of live sheep those days but went into receivership in the early 2000's if I remember.
In 1980 some 45.000 sheep perished during a massive fire on board the "Farid Fares" which sank on her way to the Middle East.

There is a bit more unpleasant reading about sheep that got lost during trips on the following site:
http://www.naturewatch.org/campaigns/australia/Background.asp
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top