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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sir John Hunter my first trip 1977

Joined in Rotterdam 18th Nov after discharging the ship went into dry-dock for 48 hours to repair a leaking stern tube seal after this we sailed to Port Gentil, Gabon to load crude oil. At Port Gentil we went for a walk along the beach and ended up in a small village. The locals were very friendly and we spent some time in the village talking with them or trying to as they spoke French and no English and none of us could speak French still we managed to converse somehow. They said we should come back at night, so that evening a few of us walked back along the beach to the village. They were made us very welcome and we stayed there a few hours. There was no bar but the local village shop had a fridge with cold beer and they also sold draft diesel. There was no electricity supply and the power came from small generators which each house seemed to have. In the corner of the shop was a 45 gall drum of diesel with a hand pump on the top. So the shop sold food mainly canned stuff, beer and diesel. Typical sailors we had very little cash so we chipped in what we had a few Pounds Sterling and few dollars some change some bars of soap nicked off the ship. The photos show the R/O Steve and his wife Karen and a couple of J/Es with the locals in the village. It was a great night and we all managed to make it along the beach and back to the ship.

We sailed from there to Golfo San Matias, Argentina, the SJH was too big to go alongside so we discharged into smaller tankers. We did not anchor, if I remember right, but steamed along very slowly while the small tankers came alongside we then connected the loading manifolds and transferred the cargo. The crew were fishing all the time we were in Argentina and caught a load of strange looking fish even the captain had a go. We were there for a few days before heading to Saldana bay, South Africa

In Saldana Bay we loaded iron ore for FOS in the South of France. We went for a walk into the town for a drink it was during the apartheid days and the bars and shops were clearly marked white and black. It was a Sunday and there were three of us, myself the radio operator and his wife. Most bars were shut but we tried the hotel and they would not let Karen in, no women were allowed in the bar and the lounge where she could get in was closed. It all seemed very strange so we bought a few beers from a local shop and sat on a bench overlooking the sea drinking them before wandering back to the ship.

We arrived and discharged the iron ore in FOS, a couple of the cadets were paying off, an engine cadet and a deck cadet. I was doing the 12 to 4 watch with the cadet and he asked me if it was alright for the deck cadet to come into the engine room after midnight as they had a project to do. The project was to make a skull and crossbones flag out of a bed sheet. I just looked the other way and never saw what was going on but the day they left they ran up the newly painted flag on the main mast. It was actually there a few days before anyone noticed but I got a good photo of it. We also had a few runs up the road where I was introduced to the French Pastis similar to Pernod and had a few sore heads with that.

We then moved back across the Atlantic to Tuberao Brazil to load iron ore for Rotterdam. I had a run up the road with a few guys of the ship. The taxis were VW beetles and five of us squeezed in. The town was great with bars on every corner, I even saw two guys riding horses through the streets and they were wearing revolvers in gun belts it looked like something out of the Clint Eastwood movies. The bars were full of girls of all colours but we were warned that some of them were not actually girls.

I left the ship, 13th March 1978 with the First mate and they took us to Vitoria, nearest town, and put us in a hotel room for the day the flight to Rio was later in the evening. The mate had been working all night and wanted the get his head down, and get some sleep, but I was wanting to go out for a walk around the town. I had a couple of drinks with the mate and then went to explore unfortunately I had a few more drinks and got completely lost, also I did not know the hotel name or address so could not find the hotel, no mobile phone in those days they had not been invented. I was eventually passing a bank with a bureau de change and thought they should speak English so I went in and explained my predicament. The guy was great he knew of a ships agent whom he phoned and eventually got me the address of the hotel and made me a map with directions. I got back to the hotel and the mate was still sleeping. Later that evening we went for a meal and got the flight to Rio, then to Zurich, another flight to London and then yet another to Glasgow.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sorry Vasco apart from the captain Rodney Megran last photo and I think the guy with the long hair under the rudder was Harry I do not remember any of the other guys names apart form Steve the R/O and his wife Karen.
 

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Yes , Jim Craigen , I can see that now .
Sailed with Jim on the Coastal Hercules when I was 3rd mate. Bit of a shock to our systems as we joined together via helicopter near Horsburgh Light anchorage (Singapore Straits). The ships was huge, no handover, just a few words and a shake of hands. Only a few days previous the ship had been boarded by pirates. Some of the guys were roughed up a bit and goods stolen. But no serious injuries. COASTAL HERCULES - IMO 7342627 - ShipSpotting.com - Ship Photos and Ship Tracker

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Malacca Straits used to be bad for pirates I have been through there a few times in the 70/80s and we had extra guys on deck looking out for pirates. No safe rooms and panic buttons in those days.
Think Nigeria is the worst place to day for offshore pirates. I was there off and on for over ten years on all sorts of drilling rigs and worked ashore. On swamp barges we used to have regular pirate drills, basically you got into a safe area locked it down and called for help and waited until the troops arrived, never saw any trouble all the time I was there though, well nothing major.
 

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John, that is one of the best posts I've seen on here. It says so much about going to sea in the 70's which, I believe, was the tail end of the great era of British seafaring. I went to sea in 76 on my first trip - up to Murmansk over the arctic circle - iron ore like you. I also remember FOS where I later joined a Italian VLCC, Vittoria and its shanty towns and so much more. Happy days indeed. All the best mate.
 

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Sir John Hunter my first trip 1977

Joined in Rotterdam 18th Nov after discharging the ship went into dry-dock for 48 hours to repair a leaking stern tube seal after this we sailed to Port Gentil, Gabon to load crude oil. At Port Gentil we went for a walk along the beach and ended up in a small village. The locals were very friendly and we spent some time in the village talking with them or trying to as they spoke French and no English and none of us could speak French still we managed to converse somehow. They said we should come back at night, so that evening a few of us walked back along the beach to the village. They were made us very welcome and we stayed there a few hours. There was no bar but the local village shop had a fridge with cold beer and they also sold draft diesel. There was no electricity supply and the power came from small generators which each house seemed to have. In the corner of the shop was a 45 gall drum of diesel with a hand pump on the top. So the shop sold food mainly canned stuff, beer and diesel. Typical sailors we had very little cash so we chipped in what we had a few Pounds Sterling and few dollars some change some bars of soap nicked off the ship. The photos show the R/O Steve and his wife Karen and a couple of J/Es with the locals in the village. It was a great night and we all managed to make it along the beach and back to the ship.

We sailed from there to Golfo San Matias, Argentina, the SJH was too big to go alongside so we discharged into smaller tankers. We did not anchor, if I remember right, but steamed along very slowly while the small tankers came alongside we then connected the loading manifolds and transferred the cargo. The crew were fishing all the time we were in Argentina and caught a load of strange looking fish even the captain had a go. We were there for a few days before heading to Saldana bay, South Africa

In Saldana Bay we loaded iron ore for FOS in the South of France. We went for a walk into the town for a drink it was during the apartheid days and the bars and shops were clearly marked white and black. It was a Sunday and there were three of us, myself the radio operator and his wife. Most bars were shut but we tried the hotel and they would not let Karen in, no women were allowed in the bar and the lounge where she could get in was closed. It all seemed very strange so we bought a few beers from a local shop and sat on a bench overlooking the sea drinking them before wandering back to the ship.

We arrived and discharged the iron ore in FOS, a couple of the cadets were paying off, an engine cadet and a deck cadet. I was doing the 12 to 4 watch with the cadet and he asked me if it was alright for the deck cadet to come into the engine room after midnight as they had a project to do. The project was to make a skull and crossbones flag out of a bed sheet. I just looked the other way and never saw what was going on but the day they left they ran up the newly painted flag on the main mast. It was actually there a few days before anyone noticed but I got a good photo of it. We also had a few runs up the road where I was introduced to the French Pastis similar to Pernod and had a few sore heads with that.

We then moved back across the Atlantic to Tuberao Brazil to load iron ore for Rotterdam. I had a run up the road with a few guys of the ship. The taxis were VW beetles and five of us squeezed in. The town was great with bars on every corner, I even saw two guys riding horses through the streets and they were wearing revolvers in gun belts it looked like something out of the Clint Eastwood movies. The bars were full of girls of all colours but we were warned that some of them were not actually girls.

I left the ship, 13th March 1978 with the First mate and they took us to Vitoria, nearest town, and put us in a hotel room for the day the flight to Rio was later in the evening. The mate had been working all night and wanted the get his head down, and get some sleep, but I was wanting to go out for a walk around the town. I had a couple of drinks with the mate and then went to explore unfortunately I had a few more drinks and got completely lost, also I did not know the hotel name or address so could not find the hotel, no mobile phone in those days they had not been invented. I was eventually passing a bank with a bureau de change and thought they should speak English so I went in and explained my predicament. The guy was great he knew of a ships agent whom he phoned and eventually got me the address of the hotel and made me a map with directions. I got back to the hotel and the mate was still sleeping. Later that evening we went for a meal and got the flight to Rio, then to Zurich, another flight to London and then yet another to Glasgow.

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Sir John Hunter my first trip 1977

Joined in Rotterdam 18th Nov after discharging the ship went into dry-dock for 48 hours to repair a leaking stern tube seal after this we sailed to Port Gentil, Gabon to load crude oil. At Port Gentil we went for a walk along the beach and ended up in a small village. The locals were very friendly and we spent some time in the village talking with them or trying to as they spoke French and no English and none of us could speak French still we managed to converse somehow. They said we should come back at night, so that evening a few of us walked back along the beach to the village. They were made us very welcome and we stayed there a few hours. There was no bar but the local village shop had a fridge with cold beer and they also sold draft diesel. There was no electricity supply and the power came from small generators which each house seemed to have. In the corner of the shop was a 45 gall drum of diesel with a hand pump on the top. So the shop sold food mainly canned stuff, beer and diesel. Typical sailors we had very little cash so we chipped in what we had a few Pounds Sterling and few dollars some change some bars of soap nicked off the ship. The photos show the R/O Steve and his wife Karen and a couple of J/Es with the locals in the village. It was a great night and we all managed to make it along the beach and back to the ship.

We sailed from there to Golfo San Matias, Argentina, the SJH was too big to go alongside so we discharged into smaller tankers. We did not anchor, if I remember right, but steamed along very slowly while the small tankers came alongside we then connected the loading manifolds and transferred the cargo. The crew were fishing all the time we were in Argentina and caught a load of strange looking fish even the captain had a go. We were there for a few days before heading to Saldana bay, South Africa

In Saldana Bay we loaded iron ore for FOS in the South of France. We went for a walk into the town for a drink it was during the apartheid days and the bars and shops were clearly marked white and black. It was a Sunday and there were three of us, myself the radio operator and his wife. Most bars were shut but we tried the hotel and they would not let Karen in, no women were allowed in the bar and the lounge where she could get in was closed. It all seemed very strange so we bought a few beers from a local shop and sat on a bench overlooking the sea drinking them before wandering back to the ship.

We arrived and discharged the iron ore in FOS, a couple of the cadets were paying off, an engine cadet and a deck cadet. I was doing the 12 to 4 watch with the cadet and he asked me if it was alright for the deck cadet to come into the engine room after midnight as they had a project to do. The project was to make a skull and crossbones flag out of a bed sheet. I just looked the other way and never saw what was going on but the day they left they ran up the newly painted flag on the main mast. It was actually there a few days before anyone noticed but I got a good photo of it. We also had a few runs up the road where I was introduced to the French Pastis similar to Pernod and had a few sore heads with that.

We then moved back across the Atlantic to Tuberao Brazil to load iron ore for Rotterdam. I had a run up the road with a few guys of the ship. The taxis were VW beetles and five of us squeezed in. The town was great with bars on every corner, I even saw two guys riding horses through the streets and they were wearing revolvers in gun belts it looked like something out of the Clint Eastwood movies. The bars were full of girls of all colours but we were warned that some of them were not actually girls.

I left the ship, 13th March 1978 with the First mate and they took us to Vitoria, nearest town, and put us in a hotel room for the day the flight to Rio was later in the evening. The mate had been working all night and wanted the get his head down, and get some sleep, but I was wanting to go out for a walk around the town. I had a couple of drinks with the mate and then went to explore unfortunately I had a few more drinks and got completely lost, also I did not know the hotel name or address so could not find the hotel, no mobile phone in those days they had not been invented. I was eventually passing a bank with a bureau de change and thought they should speak English so I went in and explained my predicament. The guy was great he knew of a ships agent whom he phoned and eventually got me the address of the hotel and made me a map with directions. I got back to the hotel and the mate was still sleeping. Later that evening we went for a meal and got the flight to Rio, then to Zurich, another flight to London and then yet another to Glasgow.

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Very good yarn and great photos. Would have loved to have the prop away.
Stay safe.
Don the Diver.
 

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Sir John Hunter my first trip 1977

Joined in Rotterdam 18th Nov after discharging the ship went into dry-dock for 48 hours to repair a leaking stern tube seal after this we sailed to Port Gentil, Gabon to load crude oil. At Port Gentil we went for a walk along the beach and ended up in a small village. The locals were very friendly and we spent some time in the village talking with them or trying to as they spoke French and no English and none of us could speak French still we managed to converse somehow. They said we should come back at night, so that evening a few of us walked back along the beach to the village. They were made us very welcome and we stayed there a few hours. There was no bar but the local village shop had a fridge with cold beer and they also sold draft diesel. There was no electricity supply and the power came from small generators which each house seemed to have. In the corner of the shop was a 45 gall drum of diesel with a hand pump on the top. So the shop sold food mainly canned stuff, beer and diesel. Typical sailors we had very little cash so we chipped in what we had a few Pounds Sterling and few dollars some change some bars of soap nicked off the ship. The photos show the R/O Steve and his wife Karen and a couple of J/Es with the locals in the village. It was a great night and we all managed to make it along the beach and back to the ship.

We sailed from there to Golfo San Matias, Argentina, the SJH was too big to go alongside so we discharged into smaller tankers. We did not anchor, if I remember right, but steamed along very slowly while the small tankers came alongside we then connected the loading manifolds and transferred the cargo. The crew were fishing all the time we were in Argentina and caught a load of strange looking fish even the captain had a go. We were there for a few days before heading to Saldana bay, South Africa

In Saldana Bay we loaded iron ore for FOS in the South of France. We went for a walk into the town for a drink it was during the apartheid days and the bars and shops were clearly marked white and black. It was a Sunday and there were three of us, myself the radio operator and his wife. Most bars were shut but we tried the hotel and they would not let Karen in, no women were allowed in the bar and the lounge where she could get in was closed. It all seemed very strange so we bought a few beers from a local shop and sat on a bench overlooking the sea drinking them before wandering back to the ship.

We arrived and discharged the iron ore in FOS, a couple of the cadets were paying off, an engine cadet and a deck cadet. I was doing the 12 to 4 watch with the cadet and he asked me if it was alright for the deck cadet to come into the engine room after midnight as they had a project to do. The project was to make a skull and crossbones flag out of a bed sheet. I just looked the other way and never saw what was going on but the day they left they ran up the newly painted flag on the main mast. It was actually there a few days before anyone noticed but I got a good photo of it. We also had a few runs up the road where I was introduced to the French Pastis similar to Pernod and had a few sore heads with that.

We then moved back across the Atlantic to Tuberao Brazil to load iron ore for Rotterdam. I had a run up the road with a few guys of the ship. The taxis were VW beetles and five of us squeezed in. The town was great with bars on every corner, I even saw two guys riding horses through the streets and they were wearing revolvers in gun belts it looked like something out of the Clint Eastwood movies. The bars were full of girls of all colours but we were warned that some of them were not actually girls.

I left the ship, 13th March 1978 with the First mate and they took us to Vitoria, nearest town, and put us in a hotel room for the day the flight to Rio was later in the evening. The mate had been working all night and wanted the get his head down, and get some sleep, but I was wanting to go out for a walk around the town. I had a couple of drinks with the mate and then went to explore unfortunately I had a few more drinks and got completely lost, also I did not know the hotel name or address so could not find the hotel, no mobile phone in those days they had not been invented. I was eventually passing a bank with a bureau de change and thought they should speak English so I went in and explained my predicament. The guy was great he knew of a ships agent whom he phoned and eventually got me the address of the hotel and made me a map with directions. I got back to the hotel and the mate was still sleeping. Later that evening we went for a meal and got the flight to Rio, then to Zurich, another flight to London and then yet another to Glasgow.

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Sir John Hunter my first trip 1977

Joined in Rotterdam 18th Nov after discharging the ship went into dry-dock for 48 hours to repair a leaking stern tube seal after this we sailed to Port Gentil, Gabon to load crude oil. At Port Gentil we went for a walk along the beach and ended up in a small village. The locals were very friendly and we spent some time in the village talking with them or trying to as they spoke French and no English and none of us could speak French still we managed to converse somehow. They said we should come back at night, so that evening a few of us walked back along the beach to the village. They were made us very welcome and we stayed there a few hours. There was no bar but the local village shop had a fridge with cold beer and they also sold draft diesel. There was no electricity supply and the power came from small generators which each house seemed to have. In the corner of the shop was a 45 gall drum of diesel with a hand pump on the top. So the shop sold food mainly canned stuff, beer and diesel. Typical sailors we had very little cash so we chipped in what we had a few Pounds Sterling and few dollars some change some bars of soap nicked off the ship. The photos show the R/O Steve and his wife Karen and a couple of J/Es with the locals in the village. It was a great night and we all managed to make it along the beach and back to the ship.

We sailed from there to Golfo San Matias, Argentina, the SJH was too big to go alongside so we discharged into smaller tankers. We did not anchor, if I remember right, but steamed along very slowly while the small tankers came alongside we then connected the loading manifolds and transferred the cargo. The crew were fishing all the time we were in Argentina and caught a load of strange looking fish even the captain had a go. We were there for a few days before heading to Saldana bay, South Africa

In Saldana Bay we loaded iron ore for FOS in the South of France. We went for a walk into the town for a drink it was during the apartheid days and the bars and shops were clearly marked white and black. It was a Sunday and there were three of us, myself the radio operator and his wife. Most bars were shut but we tried the hotel and they would not let Karen in, no women were allowed in the bar and the lounge where she could get in was closed. It all seemed very strange so we bought a few beers from a local shop and sat on a bench overlooking the sea drinking them before wandering back to the ship.

We arrived and discharged the iron ore in FOS, a couple of the cadets were paying off, an engine cadet and a deck cadet. I was doing the 12 to 4 watch with the cadet and he asked me if it was alright for the deck cadet to come into the engine room after midnight as they had a project to do. The project was to make a skull and crossbones flag out of a bed sheet. I just looked the other way and never saw what was going on but the day they left they ran up the newly painted flag on the main mast. It was actually there a few days before anyone noticed but I got a good photo of it. We also had a few runs up the road where I was introduced to the French Pastis similar to Pernod and had a few sore heads with that.

We then moved back across the Atlantic to Tuberao Brazil to load iron ore for Rotterdam. I had a run up the road with a few guys of the ship. The taxis were VW beetles and five of us squeezed in. The town was great with bars on every corner, I even saw two guys riding horses through the streets and they were wearing revolvers in gun belts it looked like something out of the Clint Eastwood movies. The bars were full of girls of all colours but we were warned that some of them were not actually girls.

I left the ship, 13th March 1978 with the First mate and they took us to Vitoria, nearest town, and put us in a hotel room for the day the flight to Rio was later in the evening. The mate had been working all night and wanted the get his head down, and get some sleep, but I was wanting to go out for a walk around the town. I had a couple of drinks with the mate and then went to explore unfortunately I had a few more drinks and got completely lost, also I did not know the hotel name or address so could not find the hotel, no mobile phone in those days they had not been invented. I was eventually passing a bank with a bureau de change and thought they should speak English so I went in and explained my predicament. The guy was great he knew of a ships agent whom he phoned and eventually got me the address of the hotel and made me a map with directions. I got back to the hotel and the mate was still sleeping. Later that evening we went for a meal and got the flight to Rio, then to Zurich, another flight to London and then yet another to Glasgow.

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Hi John,

Great Post, the ships name rang a bell from days long gone. Looking up my pilotage records I see I piloted Sir John Hunter in and out of Hay Point, Queensland 14-4-1979 - 15-4- 79. The Captain was J.D. Pollock, perhaps you might have sailed with him?

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi Roscoes, I was on that trip you mention above and I have just been putting together some notes and photos of my 2nd trip on the SJH.

Sir John Hunter 2nd trip

Joined at Cape Town 27 Jan 1979, by boat, and discharged Iron ore at Kimitsu, Japan and coal at Nagoya, or it might have been the other way around.

We spent about four weeks in dry-dock in Ulsan at the Hyundai Heavy Industries dry-dock, this is the largest shipyard in the World. In the early morning all work stopped and every single person in the yard would do exercises, see photo. At that time they also had a novel way of securing air, water hoses etc, they would put the hose on the fitting and then wrap what looked like a welding rod around the hose and then twist the ends together no pipe clamps used, I never saw one leaking. A few of the engineers had a go at this but could never get it secured properly so we went back to Jubilee pipe clamps. For you information Jubilee clamps have been banned in the offshore industry for many years and pipe clamps with two bolts are used.

The Hyundai department store was short distance from the dock gates through the town. All the schoolchildren we passed going from the yard to store would try out their English on us everyone was really friendly. You could get specs made here over night, you gave the guy you own specs he checked them out to find the prescription and then could make you a new pair overnight can’t remember the price but it was very cheap. Another thing we got in the store was name tags in the style that the dockyard workers wore, you wrote down your name and they translated this into Korean and engraved it on the name tag. The tags had bars on them which distinguished the grade of worker so of course we got ours at the grade on Engineering Superintendent. There was an ulterior motive for this at night we used to go to the bar in the foreigners compound which was nearby. It was within walking distance but we had to make a detour to go through the foreigner’s gate, there was only one gate foreigners were allowed out of the yard. However we found that if we wore the badge with our names in Korean they would let us through another gate, used by locals, making it a shorter walk to the club. To supplement our expense in the bar we used to take bottles of whiskey to sell in the club, this was hard to obtain in Korea at this time so we got a good price for it and we had loads on the ship. The club obtained by devious means its supplies of booze from the nearby American base PX store. The Americans had no Scotch whisky but plenty of blue label Smirnoff so we sometime just took bottles of whisky and swapped these for vodka.

The next loading port was Haypoint, Queensland, Australia where we loaded coal. The cargo was discharged in FOS (Marseille) and Taranto Italy. I paid off in FOS 1st June 1979



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Hi Roscoes, I was on that trip you mention above and I have just been putting together some notes and photos of my 2nd trip on the SJH.

Sir John Hunter 2nd trip

Joined at Cape Town 27 Jan 1979, by boat, and discharged Iron ore at Kimitsu, Japan and coal at Nagoya, or it might have been the other way around.

We spent about four weeks in dry-dock in Ulsan at the Hyundai Heavy Industries dry-dock, this is the largest shipyard in the World. In the early morning all work stopped and every single person in the yard would do exercises, see photo. At that time they also had a novel way of securing air, water hoses etc, they would put the hose on the fitting and then wrap what looked like a welding rod around the hose and then twist the ends together no pipe clamps used, I never saw one leaking. A few of the engineers had a go at this but could never get it secured properly so we went back to Jubilee pipe clamps. For you information Jubilee clamps have been banned in the offshore industry for many years and pipe clamps with two bolts are used.

The Hyundai department store was short distance from the dock gates through the town. All the schoolchildren we passed going from the yard to store would try out their English on us everyone was really friendly. You could get specs made here over night, you gave the guy you own specs he checked them out to find the prescription and then could make you a new pair overnight can’t remember the price but it was very cheap. Another thing we got in the store was name tags in the style that the dockyard workers wore, you wrote down your name and they translated this into Korean and engraved it on the name tag. The tags had bars on them which distinguished the grade of worker so of course we got ours at the grade on Engineering Superintendent. There was an ulterior motive for this at night we used to go to the bar in the foreigners compound which was nearby. It was within walking distance but we had to make a detour to go through the foreigner’s gate, there was only one gate foreigners were allowed out of the yard. However we found that if we wore the badge with our names in Korean they would let us through another gate, used by locals, making it a shorter walk to the club. To supplement our expense in the bar we used to take bottles of whiskey to sell in the club, this was hard to obtain in Korea at this time so we got a good price for it and we had loads on the ship. The club obtained by devious means its supplies of booze from the nearby American base PX store. The Americans had no Scotch whisky but plenty of blue label Smirnoff so we sometime just took bottles of whisky and swapped these for vodka.

The next loading port was Haypoint, Queensland, Australia where we loaded coal. The cargo was discharged in FOS (Marseille) and Taranto Italy. I paid off in FOS 1st June 1979



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Great photos John. Please keep them coming.
I attended the Cast ships new buildings at the Ulsan Hyundai shipyard in the early 80's and also recall the morning call to exercise. And the English language lessons on the loud speakers during work breaks.
 
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