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Discussion Starter #1
I was looking at a picture of my old ship, the Arisaig and noticed that on the fore side of the goalposts, plumbing the forecastle, seem to be two stowed derrick's. Some of the other ore carriers seem to have an "ordinary" foremast, instead of the goalposts so I am wondering what purpose these derricks would serve? They were certainly never used in my time!
 

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Must admit that in the hundreds of visits to 'my ore carriers' I never noticed any difference in deck equipment....perhaps someone like Varley can answer you??

Geoff
 

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George, the derricks were mainly used (if there were no shore-side cranes available ) to load heavy stores eg. coils of rope or pallets of paint etc....

Frank
 

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Discussion Starter #4
George, the derricks were mainly used (if there were no shore-side cranes available ) to load heavy stores eg. coils of rope or pallets of paint etc....

Frank
Sounds about right. I have a recollection of a hatch on the forecastle , welded shut but really little more.
Thanks anyway
 

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George, Geoff. Not really my bag. One for the Mates. Only carried ore in OBOs and never saw one of those 'geared' (except PROBO MV Arctic which I take as a special case and those were cranes).
 

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Have sailed on many of the wee ore carriers ( including the Arisaig ) . The forward
derricks plumbed the stores hatch into the focsle but they would be welded in position by rust as I never remember them being topped.
 

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The only time I saw the after derrick rigged on the "Morven" (Denholms Ore carrier) was to load Fingers Fleck (Chief Engineer)'s Organ (piano type),, presento from Mitsubishi Drydock Yokohama, onboard . Sure livened up the parties..
 

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On the Sagamore, the goal posts forward, I believe, were to support the forward mast for the forward masthead light, and also to show where the front of the ship was when the rest of it was submerged in the North Atlantic. (Jester)(Jester)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
On the Sagamore, the goal posts forward, I believe, were to support the forward mast for the forward masthead light, and also to show where the front of the ship was when the rest of it was submerged in the North Atlantic. (Jester)(Jester)
Sounds like some of the Arisaig,s voyages!
 

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They weren't known as "BISCO submarines" for no reason!........................
 

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Discussion Starter #12
We did think about a periscope on the Arisaig!
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It was said that Houlder Bros. insisted that their ore carriers went south in the winter while we went north but I am sure that someone from Houlders would tell it differently.

Joking apart they were good, seaworthy ships. Whatever the weather they got the job done.
 

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We did think about a periscope on the Arisaig!
.
It was said that Houlder Bros. insisted that their ore carriers went south in the winter while we went north but I am sure that someone from Houlders would tell it differently.

Joking apart they were good, seaworthy ships. Whatever the weather they got the job done.
Well George , they may have got the job done but they were
underpowered , uncomfortable and hardworking ships. They suited some because of being back in the UK regularly but they were no
holiday.
 

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We did think about a periscope on the Arisaig!
.
It was said that Houlder Bros. insisted that their ore carriers went south in the winter while we went north but I am sure that someone from Houlders would tell it differently.

Joking apart they were good, seaworthy ships. Whatever the weather they got the job done.
Don't know where that story came from but it certainly was an instruction that didn't reach or was ignored by the Houlder carriers I was on. Frequently from Belle Isle to the Bristol Channel, the outside decks were no go areas and it was normal to look at green water outside the ports for a full week. They were well named submarines. The two bigger ones were no better.
 

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As a former Ship Scheduling Controller of BISCO/BSC fleets I can confirm that no such instructions were issued by any Owners at any time.....and would have been ignored anyway!

Geoff
 

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When I was in the Sagamore in 1964, a huge sea smashed over the bow and ripped both derrick posts out of the deck. The derricks whipped back, and bent the heels by about 90 degrees. One of the posts was bent about two feet out of true at the top. We were outward bound from Newport towards Savona with 4,000 tons of coiled steel sheeting aboard. It all shifted, and a lot of it unravelled. It was an experimental outward cargo. One of the Skyfotos images from the starboard bow shows the broken derricks bent backwards, and dumped into the space in front of Nr1, where they were tied down until they could be cut away in Savona. I never saw the derricks used, and I was there for two years!
Bob
 

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I was in the Pennyworth and the Monksgarth. Both were bad sea ships and very uncomfortable in any sort of sea. Semi submersible with the ability to roll on wet grass would describe them both.
However, they both were good feeders and I first ate a wonderful Geordie dish called Panaskelty or Pan Haggerty on these ships.
One thing I recall was that there was very little opportunity to work out on deck because of the constant foul weather, so we did a lot of sugi and painting in the tunnel and in the accommodation.
 

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I was in the Pennyworth and the Monksgarth. Both were bad sea ships and very uncomfortable in any sort of sea. Semi submersible with the ability to roll on wet grass would describe them both.
However, they both were good feeders and I first ate a wonderful Geordie dish called Panaskelty or Pan Haggerty on these ships.
One thing I recall was that there was very little opportunity to work out on deck because of the constant foul weather, so we did a lot of sugi and painting in the tunnel and in the accommodation.
pat panakelty .lovely from the north east wife was from durham had it once a week keep well tony
 

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The "Large "ore carriers ( Dunkyle etc) were not much better. Same discomforts
only on a larger scale. Was on two of them ; Dunkyle and the "Drunken Duncan".
 

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pat panakelty .lovely from the north east wife was from durham had it once a week keep well tony
That was it Tony, a sort of corned beef bake. We got it a couple of times a week on the Pennyworth, plus corned beef hash cakes for breakfast, delicious!
Regards,
Pat(Eat)
 
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