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A Mate who I sailed with had previously sailed on the Southern Cross and he told me that, during a call at Tahiti, a group of crew members were chased back on board the ship by a gang of locals - one of the crew had thrown a baby into a cement mixer. Nice!

John T
 

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A Mate who I sailed with had previously sailed on the Southern Cross and he told me that, during a call at Tahiti, a group of crew members were chased back on board the ship by a gang of locals - one of the crew had thrown a baby into a cement mixer. Nice!

John T
I expect the cement mixer was moonlighting...they were not particularly well paid on the islands.
I think passenger crew/local battles were the norm in those parts; I remember a skirmish, when we stopped over on the Akaroa one time, with some gung-ho passengers joining in, (on the crews side that is). Quinns was a venue noted for vigorous debate.
barry mac
 

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Hello I hope you still post. I am looking for anyone who was on that ship at that time until it returned to southampton in march 1971, as I am researching my family tree and a bit of a puzzle has appeared in it. I would very much like anyone who was on her to contact me if possible at [email protected]. I would be very grateful as I have hit a concrete wall and cannot find out any more.
 

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Hi ~ I was not on board Southern Cross arriving Southampton March 1971 - but maybe able to assist ~ are you looking for a passenger or crew member?
Cheers Jamie, Shaw Savill Society NZ Branch
 

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Joined her as Bathroom steward around 65 as a 17 year old. Drunk in every port where they paid us which was little around Australasia as so many were jumping boat. Our Chief steward was a drunken Scotsman that terrorised us all with a meat cleaver he kept in his suitcase. Life was so different then--harder but I loved it. Jumped boat after getting legless in Las Palmas on a German freighter and returned to the Port of London DBS on the Rosylin Castle Orange Boat.. I am an avid Kayak fisherman now and when I anchor off Southend with my rods I think back to those days. Oh to be that fit again..or that green
 

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I sailed from Cape Town to Southampton in early 1969 and I am trying to find information about that trip - even what dates and times it sailed. Can anyone help with that? (I think departed Cape Town about 20 April and arrived about 5 May 1969.)

My memory of the trip is very positive; my Mother's isn't! There was a big crossing the equator party. I would love to see photos of that party if any exist. I particularly remember someone dressed as a tube of toothpaste (Colgate I think).

My sister and I caused the electric fuse for our deck to go by swinging the lamp between the bunks.

What was it like on board?
 

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As a youngster in 1955 I travelled on the maiden voyage of the Southern Cross from Southampton to Wellington. I am keen to find out what do***ents exist from that period. Are any logs in existence?

I remember that when we arrived in NZ we travelled down the east coast to Wellington. The land was deserted. I suspect that we had made landfall at Castlepoint light which was classed as a landfall light. I would like to see a log to confirm this.

I have an interest in celestial navigation and would like to discover what technigues were used on the Southern Cross. For example long by chron and noon sights or intercepts? How were the sights worked - e.g. using one of the many tables available or maybe the hard way with Norie/Burton and haversines? In the age of gps this is now a lost art.
 

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As a youngster in 1955 I travelled on the maiden voyage of the Southern Cross from Southampton to Wellington. I am keen to find out what do***ents exist from that period. Are any logs in existence?

I remember that when we arrived in NZ we travelled down the east coast to Wellington. The land was deserted. I suspect that we had made landfall at Castlepoint light which was classed as a landfall light. I would like to see a log to confirm this.

I have an interest in celestial navigation and would like to discover what technigues were used on the Southern Cross. For example long by chron and noon sights or intercepts? How were the sights worked - e.g. using one of the many tables available or maybe the hard way with Norie/Burton and haversines? In the age of gps this is now a lost art.

Maybe a lost art but as long as you still remember how to calculate your P/L , not so lost.
 

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We returned from Wellington in 1963 arriving at Southampton on Novemeber25th 1963.A lovely ship the Southern Cross. My father flew back to New Zealand in 1964 and returned about 1 year later on the Northern Star.
 

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A photo of her as 'Calypso' taken in Rotterdam in late October 1976.

I was cadet on 'Megantic' at the time; we were loading in Rotterdam for NZ.

686888


I sailed with two of the engineers mentioned in post #44; Donald Mcdonald was relief C/E on 'Megantic' prior to the ship sailing on the trip I was on her, and I later met him around 2010 at an exhibition in Southend.

I think John Mcfarland was C/E on 'CYS Mariner' when I was 3/0 in 1981.

Martyn
 

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I sailed from Cape Town to Southampton in early 1969 and I am trying to find information about that trip - even what dates and times it sailed. Can anyone help with that? (I think departed Cape Town about 20 April and arrived about 5 May 1969.)

My memory of the trip is very positive; my Mother's isn't! There was a big crossing the equator party. I would love to see photos of that party if any exist. I particularly remember someone dressed as a tube of toothpaste (Colgate I think).

My sister and I caused the electric fuse for our deck to go by swinging the lamp between the bunks.

What was it like on board?
Hello TimLee

I was working on board Southern Cross on your voyage from Capetown to Southampton, in the Purser's Office, only date I am certain of is arrival date in Southampton 5th May 1969 being the day I paid off according to my Seaman's Discharge Book. Its just over 3 days sailing from Las Palmas to Southampton so would have left Las Palmas 2nd May, and 10 days sailing from Capetown to Las Palmas, so would have left South Africa on 23 April or possibly 22nd depending on time of departure, according to my records, the ship usually overnighted in Capetown and sailed 0700 the following morning, so I would day if we sailed 0700, it had to be 23April.
I do have cine film of the Crossing the Line Ceremony but not necessarily taken on your voyage.
If you use FB then I suggest you join Northern Star & Southern Cross link on FB, and you will see some on my photos and cine film taken on Southern Cross, mostly taken in 1968 but some may have been 69. I have a couple of photos of the Crossing the Line ceremony which I can post, but do not see any Colgate toothpaste!
Cheers Jamie Shedden, Auckland NZ (ex Asst Purser, Southern Cross 1967-69 & '71).
 

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Castlepoint;

I don't know what was used for sights on the ship at the time you are interested in, but when I joined SSA as a cadet in 1976, everyone I sailed with used Marc St Hilaire, and that was the only way I was taught.

All done with 'long' tables, Nautical Almanac, Nories, Burton's, etc; logarithms; when I qualified as 3/O in 1980, personal hand held calculators were beginning to be come common.

Typically, the 4-8 would do 'stars' at morning twilight; 2/O and 3/O do a morning Marc St Hilaire during the early part of the 8-12; 2/O and 3/O do the 'mer alt' to get the latitude at 1200 local time, with the morning sight run up to the 12 o'clock position to give the longitude; and either 4-8 (usually) or 8-12 (rarely-I probably only did it less than twenty times) did stars again at evening twilight.

At least some ships had the Air Sight Reduction tables, which gave a quicker method for calculation the 'stars' position.

When I was first 3/O in the early 80s, either Venus or Jupiter was at 'mer alt' around 1030 ship's time for a few months, so I took it if possible; this gave a second accurate latitude and a good cross check with the noon position.

I only remember once taking a moon sight; having not seen the sun or stars for about four days in a westerly gale/storm with rain during an Atlantic eastbound crossing, and approaching the Scilly Isles, I was able to get one which gave us a reasonable longitude, as it was almost due west at the time. Subsequent terrestrial fixes showed our DR latitude was a bit out.........

In the Northern latitudes, a 'quick' star sight for position could be achieved by using Polaris (latitude) and two other stars to give a NW-SE p/l and NE/SW p/l to give the position triangle, and hence the longitude. I know that a number of mates would work out about five individual stars to give a cocked hat for the position.

I sometime mixed a planetary sight with the stars, if one was around.

HTH

Martyn
 

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The trick was to angle it forward and down. That way you got a steady breeze (but avoided whatever was chucked overboard) and didn't get caught out if you ran into a shower/squall. Only ever sailed on two ships with air-con and found the scoops a God-send on the others.

On one ship without air-con I had a cabin with 'sash windows' that slid up and down like those that used to be common in railway carriages. No such things as scoops on there and it could be stifling in the West Indies in both Summer and Winter. The Radio Room was worse - it was inboard, with just a skylight and no portholes at all.
 
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