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In an earlier thread I discussed a ship I'd seen in Liverpool docks during the war called the Felix Roussel, I have now come across an old photo of her, it may be of interest to Jan.Tell
 

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Thanks Tell,
The graciousness of the ship totally disappears with those poor looking funnels.
You wonder what was in the mind of that naval architect.
 

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Jan Hendrik said:
Thanks Tell,
The graciousness of the ship totally disappears with those poor looking funnels.
You wonder what was in the mind of that naval architect.
Perhaps he was ahead of his time Jan.....looks like the prototype for the
first on board heli deck.......
 

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Well if so I hope he had some decent on board sensors to help him come down through the smoke to land, even the RN wouldnt be that silly, would they??.
Doug
 

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Jan Hendrik said:
Thanks Tell,
The graciousness of the ship totally disappears with those poor looking funnels.
You wonder what was in the mind of that naval architect.
I believe that the only reason was economy. Is much easier and cheaper to build a square funnel, welding together straight plates, than roll and fair them in a more streamlined shape. I wonder if it was worth to spoil the appareance of the ship for a little money saving.
Piero
 

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Arosa Sun

Bruce Carson said:
She was one of a series of square funneled ships built for Messageries Maritimes in the late twenties and thirties.
Refunneled in a post war refit, she is probably better known as Arosa's Arosa Sun.

There's a really super Messageries Maritimes site online and they have a pictorial history of the ship:
http://www.es-conseil.fr/pramona/felix.htm

Here's a pic of Arosa Sun in late Fifties.
Her line is indeed much bettered by the single streamlined funnel and raked bow.
After the collapse of Arosa Line in 1958, she became an accomodation ship for Royal Dutch Steelworks, Broken up al Bilbao in 1974.
P.
 

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Messageries Maritimes

The reason for the very odd looking funnels on the 1930s Messageries Maritimes ships was apparently entirely due to styling. The funnels were known as Nautonaphtes and were fitted on 6 MM ships. No one else used them. They looked a little better when they were painted white later in the lives of the ships.

Fred
 
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