Ships Nostalgia banner
61 - 80 of 91 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,453 Posts
Hear hear twogrumpy. The (crews cook)Bhandaries curry was good also as long as you did not watch the preparation. Every part of the fish went in when we caught fish or shark.
And very trustworthy.
Right, best not see the prep work, same goes for the chicken, every bit goes in.
Used to watch the Bhandari rolling out his curry paste on the old stone slab.

Deep fried chapaties were great as well for breakfast al fresco on the poop + a beer as well if on the 4-8.

2G
 

· Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
The penny has only just dropped that I sailed with 'Barnsey' a couple of times (the Reliance and extra 2/0 possibly on the Kestrel). David, you persuaded me that the best way to deal with an especially nasty cold that I had was to drink hot whiskey toddies whilst listening to your Strauss Waltz records (or was it Gilbert and Sullivan?). I felt great.....until the next morning.

Nice to see your smiling face on your profile.

Sorry to go off thread!!
I'm not sorry you "Went off thread" Bill ...just following up the various threads where you are mentioned ... missed following this one up. Yup The "Reliance was the ship where I ceased drinking Whiskey .....never touched it since would you believe? Ooooooh that night we anchored at Kawasaki (?) it was cold and after hours on the bridge we needed warming up .. Whisky and Greens ginger wine ...went down a treat but ... as you remember the night and next morning was terrible ....hence never again has the stuff touched my lips ...got half a bottle of Black Label in the store, my mate has been battling away trying to drink it.

David
 

· Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I'm not sorry you "Went off thread" Bill ...just following up the various threads where you are mentioned ... missed following this one up. Yup The "Reliance was the ship where I ceased drinking Whiskey .....never touched it since would you believe? Ooooooh that night we anchored at Kawasaki (?) it was cold and after hours on the bridge we needed warming up .. Whisky and Greens ginger wine ...went down a treat but ... as you remember the night and next morning was terrible ....hence never again has the stuff touched my lips ...got half a bottle of Black Label in the store, my mate has been battling away trying to drink it.

David
Hi David, and thanks for the reply. You are right about the location, and for all that I felt rough I still managed a run into Tokyo next day with our Celtic dancing, bagpipe playing 4/E Vic Black. Interesting to learn that you haven't touched a drop of Whisky since!

Kawasaki was cold, but New Jersey towards the end of our trip was much colder still. We were close to Philadelphia. My not so reliable memory tells me that the name of the town was Belle Air, but I could be very wrong on that one. It was colder than any run up the Baltic.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Hi David, and thanks for the reply. You are right about the location, and for all that I felt rough I still managed a run into Tokyo next day with our Celtic dancing, bagpipe playing 4/E Vic Black. Interesting to learn that you haven't touched a drop of Whisky since!

Kawasaki was cold, but New Jersey towards the end of our trip was much colder still. We were close to Philadelphia. My not so reliable memory tells me that the name of the town was Belle Air, but I could be very wrong on that one. It was colder than any run up the Baltic.
Morning Bill from a bright sunny Westport NZ ...now that the radiation fog has burnt off!!

We went right up to Philadelphia, anchored a little higher than the airport between two bridges while we filled in those masses of silly forms, got finger printed and generally kept an army of civil servants in a job for the afternoon. Then we went on up above the city to a berth just before a railway bridge.

Very slow discharge for some reason ... lack of steam? Thick cargo? High back pressure? ..... I think Graham hopped up on a table and had a dance with a disco lass???

Can't remember where we went after there but I do remember crossing the junction of the Gulf Stream and an area of "Sea Smoke" .... we also visited some South American Port .....maybe to load the cargo for Philadelphia ....???

Yup, she was a happy ship and trip .... paid off in Liverpool.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
666 Posts
Hi David, and thanks for the reply. You are right about the location, and for all that I felt rough I still managed a run into Tokyo next day with our Celtic dancing, bagpipe playing 4/E Vic Black. Interesting to learn that you haven't touched a drop of Whisky since!

Kawasaki was cold, but New Jersey towards the end of our trip was much colder still. We were close to Philadelphia. My not so reliable memory tells me that the name of the town was Belle Air, but I could be very wrong on that one. It was colder than any run up the Baltic.
Think we went to this berth near Philadelphia on British Industry in 1969. The district was Delair, Pennsauken, New Jersey. Some of us went to have a look around one of the new shopping mall's just down the road at Cherry Hill. Bought a Steppenwolf and Chicago LP - still have them in very good condition! Very large and impressive in those days. It is still marked on the map; also I note that there is still an oil terminal at Delair.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Morning Bill from a bright sunny Westport NZ ...now that the radiation fog has burnt off!!

We went right up to Philadelphia, anchored a little higher than the airport between two bridges while we filled in those masses of silly forms, got finger printed and generally kept an army of civil servants in a job for the afternoon. Then we went on up above the city to a berth just before a railway bridge.

Very slow discharge for some reason ... lack of steam? Thick cargo? High back pressure? ..... I think Graham hopped up on a table and had a dance with a disco lass???

Can't remember where we went after there but I do remember crossing the junction of the Gulf Stream and an area of "Sea Smoke" .... we also visited some South American Port .....maybe to load the cargo for Philadelphia ....???

Yup, she was a happy ship and trip .... paid off in Liverpool.
You are a wise man living in NZ. A lovely country.

Having spent just 6 years at sea the memories of some of the individual trips are still reasonably fresh. Thanks to Gadgee I now know that the berth in New Jersey was Delair, not Belle Air. Thank you Gadgee.

We visited Uruguay and La Plata before going up to Delair, and then Venezuela before returning to the UK. We had also spent time earlier in the trip ferrying cargo to Porto Marghera near Venice from Milazzo in Sicily. Throw in a visit to Karachi and it was a pretty interesting voyage. Plenty of hog wash in between mind you.

Best wishes with your retirement David Regards Bill H
 

· Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Batley Bill have,nt thought about DELAIR NJ it was my first time in the US (all be it on a SHELL tanker the ANADARA) sorry boys no offence implied ......as a boy it was an experience and a half we came from PUNTA CARDON

PS I however did sail on 3 BPTC ships one was the birdy boat "BRITISH MALLARD "
 

· Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Batley Bill have,nt thought about DELAIR NJ it was my first time in the US (all be it on a SHELL tanker the ANADARA) sorry boys no offence implied ......as a boy it was an experience and a half we came from PUNTA CARDON

PS I however did sail on 3 BPTC ships one was the birdy boat "BRITISH MALLARD "
Hi Backsplice. Whilst I was in Delair I took it into my head to visit a New York/Italian family that I knew from my first trip to sea and thanks to a Nav App on said trip who was a pen pal of the daughter of the family. It was, I guess, the sort of daft thing that you do when you are a you 21 years old. I took a taxi to Philadelphia, a train up to New York, fought my way across Grand Central Station to the subway terminus and caught the Down Town Express to Sheepshead Bay (near Coney Island). Emerging from the local station after several hours travel I walked a couple of streets to their house, and knocked on the door. They were out!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
531 Posts
Hi Backsplice. Whilst I was in Delair I took it into my head to visit a New York/Italian family that I knew from my first trip to sea and thanks to a Nav App on said trip who was a pen pal of the daughter of the family. It was, I guess, the sort of daft thing that you do when you are a you 21 years old. I took a taxi to Philadelphia, a train up to New York, fought my way across Grand Central Station to the subway terminus and caught the Down Town Express to Sheepshead Bay (near Coney Island). Emerging from the local station after several hours travel I walked a couple of streets to their house, and knocked on the door. They were out!
Brilliant(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)
 

· Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
chasH

Janbonde,
In between the Butterworth & the gunclean system, there were the Victor Pyrate machines. These were very similar to Butterworths but had an additional arm (3 instead of the Butterworth's 2). In BP at least, the supertankers tended to use the Victor Pyrate machines whereas the smaller ones stuck to Butterworths. At that time (50s & early 60s), there was no such thing as a slop tank & all the sludge was just pumped directly over the side. On the supertankers, tank cleaning would start as soon as the discharge port was left behind & oil trails could clearly be seen in the Western Approaches. Try doing that today.
Regards,
John F
hi I was on the British Beacon we used to lower the butterworth system down over a saddle which fitted over the hole once the plate was removed, because of the heating coils packed up the oil stuck like glue we ended up actually going into the tanks washing them with those non flexible solid rubber hoses red hot water, we wrapped the hoses with rags because the were to hot to hold you could not see a thing because of the steam I don't think that would happen today they were Italian built the light, lantern, beacon comet, star one other I think they ordered six and paid for 5 anybody sailed on them all the best to everyone.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
124 Posts
... they were Italian built the light, lantern, beacon comet, star one other I think they ordered six and paid for 5 anybody sailed on them all the best to everyone.
Hi Chas,
I think that the one which you are missing of the "Eyeties" is the British Signal. I sailed on the Signal and did my fair share of Butterworthing.

The Signal had a eventful life, including a engineroom fire off the West coast of Africa which left us drifting for 3 days. The poor engineers were worn out, but eventually got us going again. The USAF sent out a reconnaissance plane to overfly us and check that we were OK. The upside was that the shark fishing was good when we were off watch!

Regards, Mike
 

· Registered
Joined
·
814 Posts
Hi Hamish ....
It was usual to carry the 'extra' Deck Officers when a ship was coastal trading and working a lot of ports in a few days involving loading, discharging & tank-cleaning. .. enabling sleep to be obtained as and when by all!
Have to admit I never sailed with an 'extra' Master .. but certainly with 'extra' mates & second mates on the coast.
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
666 Posts
hi I was on the British Beacon we used to lower the butterworth system down over a saddle which fitted over the hole once the plate was removed, because of the heating coils packed up the oil stuck like glue we ended up actually going into the tanks washing them with those non flexible solid rubber hoses red hot water, we wrapped the hoses with rags because the were to hot to hold you could not see a thing because of the steam I don't think that would happen today they were Italian built the light, lantern, beacon comet, star one other I think they ordered six and paid for 5 anybody sailed on them all the best to everyone.
For a further discussion on the merits or otherwise of the "Light" class see the forum here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=10964&highlight=eyeties
 

· Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
Hi Hamish ....
It was usual to carry the 'extra' Deck Officers when a ship was coastal trading and working a lot of ports in a few days involving loading, discharging & tank-cleaning. .. enabling sleep to be obtained as and when by all!
Have to admit I never sailed with an 'extra' Master .. but certainly with 'extra' mates & second mates on the coast.
Really? I have no recollection of any extra officers when I was coastwise in the Willow, Osprey or Unity. The Old Man often took the CO's watches to release the poor sod for supervising tank washing. I really hated those Butterworths: vile work even with a tot of 4 bells at the end.

nina
 

· Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Really? I have no recollection of any extra officers when I was coastwise in the Willow, Osprey or Unity. The Old Man often took the CO's watches to release the poor sod for supervising tank washing. I really hated those Butterworths: vile work even with a tot of 4 bells at the end.

nina
When I was coastwise on Border Pele we always had an extra 3rd officer.I only loaded/discharged and supervised tank cleaning. Great ship,Indian crew.Captain John Hill was Master.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
You must have been very unlucky Nina any time I was on the NW European coast there was an extra ?/O.. For a period in the early 70's the 50's that were on short crude oil runs around the Mediterranean and Black Sea carried an extra 3/O. I did a full trip on the Queen as x3/O..
George
 

· Registered
Joined
·
953 Posts
You must have been very unlucky Nina any time I was on the NW European coast there was an extra ?/O.. For a period in the early 70's the 50's that were on short crude oil runs around the Mediterranean and Black Sea carried an extra 3/O. I did a full trip on the Queen as x3/O..
George
On the other hand, the Osprey was an exceptionally happy ship socially and although the work was tough I recall that trip as one of the best.
n
 
61 - 80 of 91 Posts
Top