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Fixing puncture on inner tube this afternoon,but had no glue for patch,and then I seen it SUPERGLUE,so got patches on,all going great,until I inadvertenly stuck inner tube to my leg,had shorts on so had to cut hairs on my leg to get it off,had to cut right next to skin,so bit sore,and bald patch

Love to hear some stories about super glue and you(Thumb)
 

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More a question than an experience.

Does not Superglue dry 'rigid' and if so how will it handle the expansion of and flexing of the tube in service?

While we are talking punctures; has anyone any experience with those tubes that contain the green slime stuff supposed to seal punctures. Years ago I (foolishly) put one of these tubes on the bike and only last week got a puncture in it. Apart from the tyre going flat all that happened was that this green fluid ran out all over the place around the rim down the spokes and when I took the tyre off it, too, was full of the stuff. Bloody useless.(Cloud)
 

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Last month trying to fix a loose roof vent in caravan....top came off bottle ran over my hands and created burning sensation,dropped bottle but went into sink which being light plastic is almost impossible to clean up. Ruined a T shirt and a small rug...

Geoff
 

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While using it on white cap ends to fit to switches on my flight simulator overhead panel, I used my one and only sherry glass as a container to keep the tube upright. Of course it leaked all over the glass both inside and out. Impossible to get off.
 

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Last month trying to fix a loose roof vent in caravan....top came off bottle ran over my hands and created burning sensation,dropped bottle but went into sink which being light plastic is almost impossible to clean up. Ruined a T shirt and a small rug...

Geoff
Not superglue related Geoff, but yesterday was busy mothballing the caravan for the winter. I went up the ladder to look at the roof and swear every bird in the cheviots must have dumped on it at some point. I got as much off with the retractable sponge gizmo thing as possible, but it was difficult to get right under the vent covers. Phoned my mate who works in the caravan construction industry to ask advice about the weight bearing properties of a caravan roof should I wish to get a bit closer and crawl along the roof to clean thoroughly.

He said ' given your track record of of falling off, under, over, through, onto, and into, and knowing what I know about caravan construction I definitely wouldn't recommend it'(Cloud)

Ah well that's the van under cover for the winter anyway.
 

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Fixing puncture on inner tube this afternoon,but had no glue for patch,and then I seen it SUPERGLUE,so got patches on,all going great,until I inadvertenly stuck inner tube to my leg,had shorts on so had to cut hairs on my leg to get it off,had to cut right next to skin,so bit sore,and bald patch

Love to hear some stories about super glue and you(Thumb)
, Sturgeon Do you not just carry a spare innertube anyway mate(K)
That's all I do, I don't even attempt puncture repairs these days.
 

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super glue/ Acetone is the solvent to remove it
You're right. In France we could get it at supermarkets for about 2eu a litre or about 8ish eu. for 5 ltrs. In the UK off ebay, it's £8 a ltr or £30 for 5ltrs. and I've never seen it in any DIY store. Maybe we have stricter rules about it? Nail polish remover will do though - those lacquers chip so easily!! (Jester)

JJ.
 

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You're right. In France we could get it at supermarkets for about 2eu a litre or about 8ish eu. for 5 ltrs. In the UK off ebay, it's £8 a ltr or £30 for 5ltrs. and I've never seen it in any DIY store. Maybe we have stricter rules about it? Nail polish remover will do though - those lacquers chip so easily!! (Jester)

JJ.
Could well be acetone is used to balance out acetylene in cylinders.
 

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super glue/ Acetone is the solvent to remove it
Yes indeed it was, but on lightweight pressed plastic it makes holes in it as it melts! So I bought a bottle of nail varnish remover which doesn't have acetone ( most don't now of health reasons).....read and re-read the label...right at bottom says ' not suitable for light plastics'....so I bought a well known name of superglue which has a 'remover' tube as well. 'Suitable for fingers,but not on plastics....'

Various recipes appear on the internet,one was using white vinegar and leaving cloth soaked in it for some time....again totally useless.....rubbing alcohol (Drinking yes,rubbing no.)....

geoff
 

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Acetone was used in the GRP manufacturing industry, for cleaning up brushes and rollers, any overspill before it set etc. The fumes could be quite intoxicating in enclosed spaces, and leave you with a thumping headache. It is still used in some industrial applications because of its fast evaporation qualities.

There are superglues on the market now that contain an added ingredient that makes them resilient to sharp knocks.
 

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I have had nothing but bad experiences with bicycle repair kits and super glue ! Firstly l have never managed to repair a tyre successfully so have given up trying and usually take them to the bike repair shop costing a few Bob, and as for super glue it always manages to stick to your fingers and has you picking it off your hands forever ! Soap and water do no good either , whatever method used you finish up with sore hands and raised blood pressure.
 

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Acetone was used in the GRP manufacturing industry, for cleaning up brushes and rollers, any overspill before it set etc. The fumes could be quite intoxicating in enclosed spaces, and leave you with a thumping headache. It is still used in some industrial applications because of its fast evaporation qualities.

There are superglues on the market now that contain an added ingredient that makes them resilient to sharp knocks.
You reminded me of something I posted on SN a long time ago.
Sorry it's a bit long (as the head master said to the art mistress).

Back in the late '60s I was renovating an old Zephyr 2 convertible and had acquired from work, a roll of fibreglass mat and all that goes with it. I had taken the carpets out and to get the old glue off the metal, I used some of the acetone. I ended up with a lot of crap like bogies of scraped glue all over, so got my ageing Goblin vac and proceeded to suck it all up. I should have waited longer as the sparking motor brushes ignited the fumes, blew the end off the vac which then resembled a jet engine on reheat! After a quick change of underwear, I eventually got it cleared up.

JJ.
 

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You disappoint me JJ. A friend and I are having a go at doing the job properly on a variant of the iconic Mini. We can easily smell ground filler from sound metal.

At one point with her upside down and the old floor pan off his nephew, four, gawked at the project and asked if the 'little people' had done that to Uncle's car.

After my rather pompous remark about the non existence of 'little people' I less soberly remarked that we might need them to put her back together again.

Now we view every weld, good or otherwise, in the light of how said nephew will review our efforts when he is Uncle's age and again refurbishing.

Thus fiberglass is not on the agenda! (although it is tempting to try to recreate your Pratt & Goblin aero derivative!)
 

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David, when I sold the car, the lad buying it was well pleased with the completely fibre-glassed floor pan as it stiffened a very notoriously flexible shell. I believe the contractors at Ironbridge, lining the raw water tanks were not so pleased at their missing materials!
No filler in the bodywork as I spent a lot of time welding and lead-loading the panels - an art at which a plumber would have been, if not better, just quicker!
Happy days though...
These days, especially for a high quality paint finish, a fine skim of body filler flat sanded to perfection, is obligatory to ensure a good flat surface to paint. It's not considered a bodge.

JJ.
 

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Ah, the coating. We have that art yet to learn. A suggestion of the Rat-Rod look would have offered some camouflage however his good lady vetoed it (I am glad to say).

Lead-loading? I will have to consult. Don't think we have done any of that.
 
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