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Discussion Starter #1
If all goes to schedule, my illustrated book on this subject matter should be in print in early September.

A4 of around 110 pages, it details the design concept, pre-fabricated construction methods etc and the careers of all 182 vessels.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
St Andrews Fish Dock Hull in the 70's ha two TID, that were voith synder propelled. The names for the two tugs escape me?? Memory???
David,
there were five T.I.D.s at Hull owned by St Andrews and Hull Steam Trawlers
TRIUNIE ex TID 28
BERNIE ex TID 86
GILDER ex TID 87
KIERO ex TID 44
and DAGGER ex HILLMAN ex TID 79

All TIDs were steam powered with Compound two cyl. engines.

The Voith tugs came later and I think there were three of them the only names I recall being AURORA and NEPTUNE

United Towing had four ex TIDs - HILLMAN, BOWMAN, YEOMAN and FENMAN (HILLMAN was quickly sold to Pigott in Grimsby but not given a LADY name

Fosters had one - TIDSPUR

Further upstream at Selby BOCM had ARDOL, OCO which was sunk in collision, raised, repaired and renamed SELBY OLYMPIAN
 

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Discussion Starter #6
as the "chant" tankers were constructed in a similar manner, would you be doing a book on them in the future?
No John, that would be duplicating already publish work.

Both the Chants and the dry cargo version Fabrics both researched by Rev Andrew Huckett, have recently been published over several editions by the World Ship Society Ltd in their monthly journal MARINE NEWS, Supplement

I had started to compile the vessel details but stopped when I became aware of Andrews work being more advanced
 

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Does anyone have information on the TID tugs built by Malta Dockyard in the late 1960s?
Same hull design but powered by a Kelvin diesel and a modern funnel.
3 were delivered to East African Railways and Harbours and used in Dar es Salaam
Originally named TID1, 2 and 3 they were renamed Rufiji, Ruvuma and Ruvu.
Others of the same design were delivered to West Africa I believe.
The design, orders and supervision were provided by the Crown Agents, Millbank acting for the African clients.
Malta Maritime Museum has a very good model, about 1/10th scale. Tucked away in an upstairs store room when I last visited, not on public display.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Does anyone have information on the TID tugs built by Malta Dockyard in the late 1960s?
Same hull design but powered by a Kelvin diesel and a modern funnel.
3 were delivered to East African Railways and Harbours and used in Dar es Salaam
Originally named TID1, 2 and 3 they were renamed Rufiji, Ruvuma and Ruvu.
Others of the same design were delivered to West Africa I believe.
The design, orders and supervision were provided by the Crown Agents, Millbank acting for the African clients.
Malta Maritime Museum has a very good model, about 1/10th scale. Tucked away in an upstairs store room when I last visited, not on public display.
During my research for the book I was in touch with a retired Marine Superintendent from East African Railways & Harbours Company at the time based in Dar-Es-Salem, (Unfortunately his name mislaid) and he provided me with much the same information as you have. I also have the same image in the book.

“The specification for the tugs was drawn up by Crown Agents. I am not sure if they also provided the design, but from memory the lines were the same as drawings and photos I have seen of the original T.I.D.’s. I believe that West German and Netherlands yards tendered for the job, but the order was awarded to Malta Dockyard. They were built 1967’ish, with Kelvin T8 engines on a T.I.D. hull design with fairly modern funnel, basic unglazed wheelhouse and dealt with the barges at the port. Until 1970 they were known as Malta T.I.D. 1, 2 and 3. During 1970 modifications were carried out, the bulwarks were removed due to extensive damage, leaving just a 75 x 75mm angle toe board and the transom was rounded off each side with a 300mm radius. After modifications T.I.D. 1 became RUFIJI, 2- RUVU and 3- RUVUMA (all Tanzanian rivers). They gave good service during my time in Dar, but I have no knowledge of them post 1973”.
 

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During my research for the book I was in touch with a retired Marine Superintendent from East African Railways & Harbours Company ant the time based in Dar-Es-Salem, (Unfortunately his name mislaid) and he provided me with much the same information as you have. I also have the same image in the book.

“The specification for the tugs was drawn up by Crown Agents. I am not sure if they also provided the design, but from memory the lines were the same as drawings and photos I have seen of the original T.I.D.’s. I believe that West German and Netherlands yards tendered for the job, but the order was awarded to Malta Dockyard. They were built 1967’ish, with Kelvin T8 engines on a T.I.D. hull design with fairly modern funnel, basic unglazed wheelhouse and dealt with the barges at the port. Until 1970 they were known as Malta T.I.D. 1, 2 and 3. During 1970 modifications were carried out, the bulwarks were removed due to extensive damage, leaving just a 75 x 75mm angle toe board and the transom was rounded off each side with a 300mm radius. After modifications T.I.D. 1 became RUFIJI, 2- RUVU and 3- RUVUMA (all Tanzanian rivers). They gave good service during my time in Dar, but I have no knowledge of them post 1973”.
Thanks, it is me, Dick Goodey you are quoting.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks, it is me, Dick Goodey you are quoting.
Morning Dick, good to hear from you again. I thought the text looked familiar.

I suffered a PC malfunction a while back and lost a fair bit. Fortunately I had several backups so with a new PC in place it was painstakingly reloaded although some files had to be updated.

Best wishes

Bill
 

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Morning Dick, good to hear from you again. I though the text looked familiar.

I suffered a PC malfunction a while back and lost a fair bit. Fortunately I had several backups so with a new PC in place it was painstakingly reloaded although some files had to be updated.

Best wishes

Bill
Looking forward to reading your book Bill. Do you have a definitive definition of TID?
Would like to know what happened to the African TIDs, east and west after 1973.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Looking forward to reading your book Bill. Do you have a definitive definition of TID?
Would like to know what happened to the African TIDs, east and west after 1973.
Extracted from book

Since introduction in 1943, the name T.I.D. has been one of the most debated subjects. Even now, it is often argued as to which derivation of T.I.D. is correct. Below are some, if not all the opinions expressed through time.
1. Tug Invasion Duties
2. Tug Invasion Duty
3. Tug Inshore Defence
4. Tug Inshore Duties
5. Tug Inshore and Dock
6. Tug In Dock
7. Tug Intermediate Design
8. Tug Inland Developed
9. Tug Inland Distribution
10. Temporary Invasion Design.
Although, also referred to as being short for TIDDLER, the most logical choice, based purely on the scope of their recorded employment, appears to be either “Tug Inshore Duties” or “Tug Inshore and Dock”, the latter being the preferred. While T.I.D may be the official class nomenclature they were often referred to as TIDs . Both name formats were used when painted up on the hull and the names quoted for the small number that made their way into Lloyds Register were always referred therein as TID xx rather than T.I.D.
 

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Thanks Bill, I was hoping that your research had finally pinned it down but it seems it remains a matter of opinion.
I favour Tug Inshore Duty, but it is just an opinion.
 

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In the 1950/60s the Belfast Harbour Commissioners had 3 harbour tugs 2 Tids the Sir Milne , Somerton and a diesel tug Sir Kenneth . She was built by Charles Hill in Bristol with a H and W engine . I was mate in the Sir Kenneth . Skipper in the Somerton when she was relieving the Sir K . Both the Tids were oil fuel steam tugs . Happy days .
Alex C .
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In the 1950/60s the Belfast Harbour Commissioners had 3 harbour tugs 2 Tids the Sir Milne , Somerton and a diesel tug Sir Kenneth . She was built by Charles Hill in Bristol with a H and W engine . I was mate in the Sir Kenneth . Skipper in the Somerton when she was relieving the Sir K . Both the Tids were oil fuel steam tugs . Happy days .
Alex C .
SOMERTON and SIR MILNE went south and ended their days alongside at Malahide, unfortunately submerged
 

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Two still alongside in Maldon, Essex, but apparently unused though under restoration.

One named TID 172, the other BRENT.

A friend took photos about June of them there.

martyn
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Two still alongside in Maldon, Essex, but apparently unused though under restoration.

One named TID 172, the other BRENT.

A friend took photos about June of them there.

martyn
Thanks Martyn,

T.I.D.172 was towed from Mistley after the restoration project ran out of money.
BRENT has been in preserved vessel service but is going through a refurbishment
 
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