Ships Nostalgia banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
i sailed on a few tankers in the 70s and 80s they varied in speed from slow steaming to the gulf from europe on avarage about 11 knots vlccs i also s ailed on a couple of tankers that could go 20 knots plus so the question i ask is what is the furthest a tanker as traveled in one day and what is the fastest speed that a tanker as achieved (Hippy)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,118 Posts
was on a shell tanker tied up to a American genorator ship in Danang, Vietnam that was mined by VC, quickest i have ever seen a tanker move.LOL (Hippy)
 

·
Bilge Rat
Joined
·
36,005 Posts
sounds like a bit 'sparklies" work Jim! ... LOL
 

·
Malim Sahib Moderator
Joined
·
8,603 Posts
Even VLCCs these days can fairly shift. My last trip to sea (paid off in January) was a VLCC, and she could do 18 knots in ballast, and 16 in fully loaded condition (22m draught!).
Quickest tanker I've ever been on though was an LNG tanker. She was a steam turbine job and normal service speed was 21 knots, though we could push her to 23 if required.
At 21 knots she burned something like 240 tonnes of bunkers per day! However, being a gas ship, we would burn some of the cargo.
Not as daft as it sounds. LNG is carried ar -163 Celsius, with the tanks thickly insulated. As the voyage goes on, the liquid cargo warms up slightly (to at most, -160), thus some gas is given off. Rather than waste this gas by venting it to atmosphere, large compressors pump down to the boilers.
Effectively, you can go for weeks without burning a drop of bunkers!
 

·
KIWI
Joined
·
473 Posts
Can remember on Stratheden taking all of 12 hours to overtake & pass in the Red Sea a Niarchos World----- tanker.So even in the 50's some of them had a great turn of speed. KIWI
 
L

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Houlder Bros. Joya McCance ex Beuval did 20 plus(not sure of exact speed). She was on charter to Shell and because of her speed she was a big earner.
Regards
Leo (*))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,119 Posts
Some of the new clean oilers abt.47,000 DWT are not fast. Loaded 11.5m they take some getting moving I can tell you.
From dead in the water seems to take for ever to get them moving. On a falling tide sometimes wonder if you're going to get out before running out of water.
Don't have to bother slowing down for the pilot launch, 8 knots is fine.
Rgds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
What about T2s? I joined one called the "Esso Avonmouth" in Fawley for a 3-month spell, delivering fuel to ports round the UK and N.Ireland. I was told she could do 18 kts - she was certainly faster than most of the cargo ships I sailed on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
Tankers Speed

All,
Got to be the three recently departed "O" boats (Olmeda, Olna and Olwen) of the Royal Fleet Auxiliary Service.
Up to 24 knots, when pushed ie the Falklands War.
Yours aye,
Slick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
Tankers speed

In the late 1950s, on one of the Esso newly built 36000 dwt tankers[ probably the Winchester]. racing up the Red Sea/ Gulf of Suez for a north bound canal transit, a Caltex tanker, the 'Caltex Cardiff' overtook us. The Caltex Tanker appeared at dawn a few miles astern and, by dusk at the start of the first watch, she had all but disappeared over the horizon ahead of us. If I remember correctly, we had all the stops out, our speed probably something in excess of 20 knots, I would imagine the 'Caltex Cardiff' would have topped that by at least 2 knots, some speed!. The 'Caltex Cardiff' and her sister the 'Caltex Rome' were still in service when I worked for Texaco in the 1970s, renamed the 'Texaco Cardiff' and 'Texaco Rome', they were still reputed to be fast vessels.
The 24000 dwt. tankers 'Texaco Rotterdam', 'Texaco Ghent' and 'Texaco Brussels' were also fast ships. They formed a '500 club', all three vessels recording days runs in excess of 500 nautical miles. I can remember the 'Texaco Rotterdam', leaving Pembroke on a rising tide, bound for Avonmouth and arriving at King Roads for high water. A passage time of 5 hours from her berth at Pembroke Refinery to mooring in Avonmouth Locks.
Fast Tankers, but of course uneconomical as turbine propelled vessels in this age.
Bruce. (*))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
i was on the texaco rotterdam and the texaco ghent when they did the 500 nautical miles thats the reason i asked this question i can remember the skipper on the rotterdam geting very exited about it (Hippy)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
Texaco Rotterdam

Hi Peter,
Tony Reeves was the regular master on the 'Texaco Rotterdam' in my time,
a gentleman whom I held in high regard.
Bruce.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
it was tony reeves at the time he was a very big man at one time then he lost a lot a weight i sailed with him quite a few times always had a lot of time for him (Hippy)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
price said:
The 'Caltex Cardiff' and her sister the 'Caltex Rome' were still in service when I worked for Texaco in the 1970s, renamed the 'Texaco Cardiff' and 'Texaco Rome', they were still reputed to be fast vessels. Bruce. (*))
Hi Price,

The Caltex Rome was a T-2. I was mate of her at one time. She was, later,
jumboised- 1967, I believe. A great age for a t-2. When I left the company in 1963 the bulkeads were paper thin and we used to repair them with plastic patches.

If I remember correctly, the "Cardiff's" sister was the "Newcastle" or was it the Edinburgh"?

Split
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
Caltex Rome

Hi Split,
Yes, you are completely correct, the Texaco, ex 'Caltex Rome' was a T2. I was working from memory without reference. The 'Texaco Cardiff' sistership was the 'Texaco Rochester' ex 'Caltex Bristol', the 'Caltex Newcastle' and 'Caltex Edinburgh' were of the same vintage but slighty smaller. Sorry for the confusion.
Bruce. (*))
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
price said:
Hi Split,
Yes, you are completely correct, the Texaco, ex 'Caltex Rome' was a T2. I was working from memory without reference. The 'Texaco Cardiff' sistership was the 'Texaco Rochester' ex 'Caltex Bristol', the 'Caltex Newcastle' and 'Caltex Edinburgh' were of the same vintage but slighty smaller. Sorry for the confusion.
Bruce. (*))
Of course, the "Bristol"! I'd forgotten about her. Well, we can both be excused our lapses of memory. It's been a long time!

Split
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
T2 rogue river 1953 Swansea to Freamantle to the Gulf to Sweden to Tilbury 12 weeks and paid of that was a fast trip 2 cargos one of fuel oil one of crude regards
graham
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
Don't know about fast tankers, but I was certainly on one of the slowest - "El Mirlo" owned by Lobitos Oilfields of Peru and managed by C. T. Bowring. On a passage from Puerto De La Cruz in Venezuela to Isle of Grain, our average speed for the voyage was 7.4 knots!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,755 Posts
Caltex Siagon was aT2 and a ripe age in 1962.
Held together with "Thistlebond" and off watch was slapping that on pipelines and bulkheads.
Quick load in Bahrain was 7 days as we kept going off spec as cargo was getting mixed due to pipe line failures etc.
Last Caltex ship as after three months I was down the gangway after the pilot a customs officer. Never went back as safety as long as it cost nothing seemed to be the way they worked
What a scary experiance as there was always something going wrong, like the for'd pumproom full of cargo, jet fuel jetting out a crack in the hull to name but two.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
961 Posts
To Lakercapt,

We must have crossed paths. I was mate of the Saigon from January '62 until Sept '62. I joined in Port Said and left in Avonmouth. If you were mate I must have relieved you, or you me.

Did not sign a new contract and left to look for another company. Little was I to know that I was not to work on another ship again. I met my future wife and have stayed ashore ever since.


Split
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top