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Hi there
My name is Elaine and I live in New Zealand. My grandfather, Auguste Barberel, was an agent of A B Donald in Tahiti and received a Medaille d'Honneur for rescuing the mariners sunk by Von Luckner in the Friendly Islands in 1917. I have a picture of him standing on the vessel assisting the passengers onto the wharf.

He seems to have "got around" a lot. My father was born in Victoria, Australia in 1916.

I have been told that he brought his family here in this schooner but have not been able to prove this. They came to NZ in 1919 and lived in Auckland for a year or two, then moved south to Christchurch where my grandfather died in 1929. My eldest aunt told us that the French Government was represented at his funeral and arrived in black funeral suits with hats that had black ribbons on the back. They drove up in a very large black car she said. She would have been a teenager at the time.

Any tales of or information on this schooner while it was owned by A B Donald Ltd would be much appreciated.

Cheers
Elaine
 

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Welcome to SN Elaine. I can't help you with your quest but from what you've said so far I'm sure there is a fscinating story in there somewhere and I hope you keep us in touch with any progress you make.....good luck
 

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A warm welcome to the site Elaine and thank you for such an interesting start. I am sure than some of the Members will be able to expand upon this and help you in your quest, in the meantime enjoy the site and all it has to offer. We look forward to your posts. Bon Voyage
 

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echambo said:
Hi there
My name is Elaine and I live in New Zealand. My grandfather, Auguste Barberel, was an agent of A B Donald in Tahiti and received a Medaille d'Honneur for rescuing the mariners sunk by Von Luckner in the Friendly Islands in 1917. I have a picture of him standing on the vessel assisting the passengers onto the wharf.

He seems to have "got around" a lot. My father was born in Victoria, Australia in 1916.

I have been told that he brought his family here in this schooner but have not been able to prove this. They came to NZ in 1919 and lived in Auckland for a year or two, then moved south to Christchurch where my grandfather died in 1929. My eldest aunt told us that the French Government was represented at his funeral and arrived in black funeral suits with hats that had black ribbons on the back. They drove up in a very large black car she said. She would have been a teenager at the time.

Any tales of or information on this schooner while it was owned by A B Donald Ltd would be much appreciated.

Cheers
Elaine
Welcome onboard Elaine to SN hope this info helps

Pass of Balmaha was built by Robert Duncan Company, Glasgow, Scotland in 1888. The American owned ship was a 1,571-ton steel-hulled sailing bark 245 feet in length. She was owned by the Harris-Irby Cotton Company, Boston.
Under Captain John Lennard, she sailed from New York on June 24, 1916 for Archangel, Russia with a cargo of cotton. On August 1, she was stopped by a British cruiser off the north coast of Scotland and sent to Kirkwall with a British prize crew of one officer and four men. The British suspected the cargo was destined for Germany. While sailing to Kirkwall, Pass of Balmaha was captured by the German submarine U-36 and sailed to Cuxhaven, Germany arriving on August 3rd.
She was renamed Walter, equipped with an auxiliary engine, two 105-mm naval cannons, machine guns and a wireless set. On December 21, she sailed as Seeadler under command of Kapitanleutnant Felix von Luckner to act as a commerce raider. During the next 225 days she captured 15 ships in the Atlantic and Pacific. Luckner served as Artillery Officer on SMS Moewe from June through August 1916.
On August 2, 1917 while anchored at Mopelia Island, French Society Islands, Seeadler washed onto a coral reef and was destroyed. With a crew of five, Luckner set sail in an 18-foot cutter for the Fiji Islands. On arrival at Wakaya Island, the six German sailors were captured and interned as prisoners of war.
Back at Mopelia Island, on September 5, 1917, the 58 German crewmen from Seeadler captured the French schooner Lutece when she arrived at the island. Renamed Fortuna, under command of Lieutenant Alfred Kling, she sailed to Easter Island arriving on October 4th. The ship went aground at Hanga Roa the next day and could not be sailed further. On February 13, 1918 the crew sailed to Talcahuano, Chile arriving March 4, aboard the Chilean schooner Falcon. Here they were housed on a German ship anchored in the harbor. The Chilean Government interned the crew under the rules of international law intended to prevent belligerents, after having sought refuge in a neutral country, from again taking part in the war. On August 9, 1919 they were released from internment.
Meanwhile on Mopelia Island the captain of the schooner R. C. Slade, Hador Smith, set sail in a small open boat on September 19, 1917. With a crew of three, he sailed to Pago-Pago arriving on September 29. The others were subsequently rescued from Mopelia. A French relief ship, Tiare-Taporo, reached Mopelia on October 6 and carried the 41 marooned sailors to Papeete, Tahiti, arriving on October 10.
Easter Island is a Chilean possession. Chile was neutral during the war.
 

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The Vessel was reported wrecked in March 1968 off the Pacific Island of Aneityun
 

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Welcome aboard, Elaine. Enjoy the site.

Vessel Name: TIARE TAPORO
Vessel ID: 1151359
Official No: 151359
Vessel Type: Schooner
Tonnage: 168 gross
Owner: A B Donald
Built: 1913
Builder: Charles Bailey Jnr, Auckland
Region Built: Auckland
Date of Fate: Mar 1968
Type of Fate: Wrecked
Place of Fate: Off Aneityum
Region of Fate: Pacific islands or ocean


Source: http://www.nzmaritimeindex.org.nz/
 

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Welcome Elaine to the the site site as you see it does not take long for our experts to give the information asked for.
 

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Great research , gents, well done!
I'm sure I used to see Tiare Taporo in the mid-fifties in Rarotonga (I was 3/mate on Waitemata)- she must have been doing a lot of carrying around the Cooks/Society Islands (i.e. Tahiti etc)
 

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Think Andy Thompson was skipper on Tiare Taporo when she sailed out of Raro,Tony his son was skipper of Moana Roa.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Story about Andy Thomson

shad said:
Think Andy Thompson was skipper on Tiare Taporo when she sailed out of Raro,Tony his son was skipper of Moana Roa.
Somewhere when searching the net about Te Tiare Taporo I found a story written by a guy who lived on an outer island of Tahiti. He mentioned this name in that story about how he used to await the arrival of the schooner.

Does anyone know how I can find out what date the schooner arrived in Auckland with my family? I know they lived in Takapuna in 1919, then moved south to Christchurch where the last surviving member was born in 1923. Auguste died in 1929 in Christchurch.

Cheers and many thanks
Elaine
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Te Taire Taporo

Chris Field said:
Great research , gents, well done!
I'm sure I used to see Tiare Taporo in the mid-fifties in Rarotonga (I was 3/mate on Waitemata)- she must have been doing a lot of carrying around the Cooks/Society Islands (i.e. Tahiti etc)

I am sure she did carry lots of stuff between the islands. I have access to my grandfather's passport. My aunt says he travelled on her all around the Pacific when the family was based in Tahiti. He was the Vice Belgian consul to Tahiti in 1911. We have the appointment do***ents on my brother's wall!

The schooner was used for consultate business as well I understand (but can't collaborate that)

Cheers
Elaine
 

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Discussion Starter #14
gdynia said:
Welcome onboard Elaine to SN hope this info helps

Pass of Balmaha was built by Robert Duncan Company, Glasgow, Scotland in 1888. The American owned ship was a 1,571-ton steel-hulled sailing bark 245 feet in length. She was owned by the Harris-Irby Cotton Company, Boston.
Under Captain John Lennard, she sailed from New York on June 24, 1916 for Archangel, Russia with a cargo of cotton. On August 1, she was stopped by a British cruiser off the north coast of Scotland and sent to Kirkwall with a British prize crew of one officer and four men. The British suspected the cargo was destined for Germany. While sailing to Kirkwall, Pass of Balmaha was captured by the German submarine U-36 and sailed to Cuxhaven, Germany arriving on August 3rd.
She was renamed Walter, equipped with an auxiliary engine, two 105-mm naval cannons, machine guns and a wireless set. On December 21, she sailed as Seeadler under command of Kapitanleutnant Felix von Luckner to act as a commerce raider. During the next 225 days she captured 15 ships in the Atlantic and Pacific. Luckner served as Artillery Officer on SMS Moewe from June through August 1916.
On August 2, 1917 while anchored at Mopelia Island, French Society Islands, Seeadler washed onto a coral reef and was destroyed. With a crew of five, Luckner set sail in an 18-foot cutter for the Fiji Islands. On arrival at Wakaya Island, the six German sailors were captured and interned as prisoners of war.
Back at Mopelia Island, on September 5, 1917, the 58 German crewmen from Seeadler captured the French schooner Lutece when she arrived at the island. Renamed Fortuna, under command of Lieutenant Alfred Kling, she sailed to Easter Island arriving on October 4th. The ship went aground at Hanga Roa the next day and could not be sailed further. On February 13, 1918 the crew sailed to Talcahuano, Chile arriving March 4, aboard the Chilean schooner Falcon. Here they were housed on a German ship anchored in the harbor. The Chilean Government interned the crew under the rules of international law intended to prevent belligerents, after having sought refuge in a neutral country, from again taking part in the war. On August 9, 1919 they were released from internment.
Meanwhile on Mopelia Island the captain of the schooner R. C. Slade, Hador Smith, set sail in a small open boat on September 19, 1917. With a crew of three, he sailed to Pago-Pago arriving on September 29. The others were subsequently rescued from Mopelia. A French relief ship, Tiare-Taporo, reached Mopelia on October 6 and carried the 41 marooned sailors to Papeete, Tahiti, arriving on October 10.
Easter Island is a Chilean possession. Chile was neutral during the war.

Brilliant, thank you.

My Uncle Auguste wrote a story about this event based on what his father had told him . I don't have this do***ent but my cousin does. Maybe she would agree to sharing this if you want to read it. As I say, I have a picture of the arrival in Tahiti and unloading of the survivors. I must learn how to upload stuff like this. I also understand that Von Luckner was imprisoned on Ripa Island in Lyttelton Harbour, Christchurch NZ. I am still searching for proof of this. My father told me that when I was a kid. My grandmother also told me so it could be true.

Cheers

Cheers
 

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Moved thread

Folks,
I've moved this valuable thread from Say Hello to Ship Research.
 

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echambo said:
Somewhere when searching the net about Te Tiare Taporo I found a story written by a guy who lived on an outer island of Tahiti. He mentioned this name in that story about how he used to await the arrival of the schooner.

Does anyone know how I can find out what date the schooner arrived in Auckland with my family? I know they lived in Takapuna in 1919, then moved south to Christchurch where the last surviving member was born in 1923. Auguste died in 1929 in Christchurch.

Cheers and many thanks
Elaine
Try this webpage it gives 10 listings of the vessel in NZ
http://www.nzmaritimeindex.org.nz/ixsearchvessels.asp?hit=1&name=TIARE+TAPORO
 

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echambo said:
Brilliant, thank you.

My Uncle Auguste wrote a story about this event based on what his father had told him . I don't have this do***ent but my cousin does. Maybe she would agree to sharing this if you want to read it. As I say, I have a picture of the arrival in Tahiti and unloading of the survivors. I must learn how to upload stuff like this. I also understand that Von Luckner was imprisoned on Ripa Island in Lyttelton Harbour, Christchurch NZ. I am still searching for proof of this. My father told me that when I was a kid. My grandmother also told me so it could be true.

Cheers

Cheers
As the Islands correct name was Ripapa numerous Web Pages give info on Count Van Luckner. Try following

http://homepages.ihug.co.nz/~tonyf/von/VonLuckner.html
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ripapa Island

True. This is the proper name of the island. It is a Maori name. It is lucky if it is 200 meters wide. The island is almost round and has no beaches, just small cliffs of volcanic rock. When I was in the Girl Guides about 50 years ago I visited the island and walked down into the dungeons on a "hike". Unfortunately I did not know about Von Luckner then. The dungeons are all underground. The island is only about 100 meters from the shore and used to have a rickety iron bridge across between Ripa and the mainland. It is situated in the Lyttelton Harbour (a dormant volcano), the Port of Lyttelton serves Christchurch NZ. The island is still visited but you need to apply and be escorted now. All this Politically Correct rubbish has taken away all the romance of walking through the cells/dungeons!! They would not have been a good place to have to live. Very cold and damp.

Cheers
Elaine
 

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Hi Echambo, the story of the man living on a remote island. Could that have been "An Island to Oneself" by Tom Neale. He used to live on Raro,but sailed up to Suvarow Island and lived there by himself.
shad.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Re Shad's post

Not sure what the island was called. I have looked for the article again but have been unable to find it. I printed it off at the time, but with the shambles in my genealogy boxes have currently misplaced it.
 
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