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A couple of pics. of a 1:100 scale model I made for James Fisher & Sons, which is a clean products tanker.
Everything on the model is scratch made with no commercially made parts (handrail stanchions for instance, are all made on my Unimat lathe and consist of turned brass 1/16" wire with the 3 x 1/32" holes for threading brass wire through drilled in a jig, then the sections between the holes turned down to 1/32")
 

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Excellent Model

A couple of pics. of a 1:100 scale model I made for James Fisher & Sons, which is a clean products tanker.
Everything on the model is scratch made with no commercially made parts (handrail stanchions for instance, are all made on my Unimat lathe and consist of turned brass 1/16" wire with the 3 x 1/32" holes for threading brass wire through drilled in a jig, then the sections between the holes turned down to 1/32")
Congrats...a real class model.
 

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Class.

Just as a matter of interest, about 15 years ago there was a chap in Liverpool who built the most wonderful models of Blue Funnel vessels. He worked from his home and shed. Built to order for about (then) £3000. He advertised in Ships Monthly and Ships of Yesterday. He sent me some photographs of the finished articles. So impressed was I that had to have one, but the (then) booby vehemently objected. I conceded at that point.

She was adequately paid off and despatched some time after. Still lusting after a model all attempts to locate the chap to place an order failed. Still have the photographs and will post them on site (SN) when I learn how to do it.

Anyone know if he is still going?

BW

J
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Kevin, Superb model ..well done. Patience inmdeed to make the stanchions alone.

Doug
Hi, Doug,
Thanks for your remarks!
After much practice, I could turn out two handrail stanchions a minute. To make the jig, two pieces of steel about 1-1/2" x 3/4" x 3/16" thick were clamped together and a 1/16" hole drilled down where the two pieces met. Then 3 1.32" holes were drilled through the sides at the correct scale handrail position. So far, easy! then, lengths of 1/16" brass wire were fed through the jig (sorry, forgot to say that two clamping screws were made to clamp the two sides of the jig together) and the three 1/32" holes were drilled through the wire. After loosening the clamping screws, the wire is fed through an inch or so, and the process repeated a few hundred times.....
The final step is completed using the Unimat lathe: using a very finely pointed tool, and holding the free end of the rotating wire in a small tube in the tailstock to steady it, the pieces of wire between the holes is turned down to 1/32" diameter. I use a magnifying glass on a desk stand to make the job a bit easier to see!
If you try this method, you will have lots of rejects to start with, but you will quickly improve quality and speed!
I also make the propellers - if you are still awake after this and are at all interested, I can describe how to make a very simple propeller-making jig........
 

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KevinR,

superb model, now if only the builders and owners had paid as much attention to the detail as you have.

Alas, the wiches are underpowered, all mooring ropes have to be pulled in by hand. The sailors quarters are miniscule and abysmall (all 4 cabins) ..... I could go on and on,but the Dutch sum these 3 ships up very well. (Thames,Mersey and Humber Fisher)

They call them State of the Ark.

and I am speaking from experience.
 
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