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Troppo, in the late 1970s P&O used to fit their stations with two main receivers, two main transmitters (at least 1Kw) and one back up fully crystalled redundant old Oceanspan as Emergency transmitter. That was belt, braces and a piece of string.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Troppo, in the late 1970s P&O used to fit their stations with two main receivers, two main transmitters (at least 1Kw) and one back up fully crystalled redundant old Oceanspan as Emergency transmitter. That was belt, braces and a piece of string.
My first ship was a P and O box boat- we had two SRT1600 mtx..and two Collins synthesised mrx...

But, I've never seen two Conquerors...
 

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Tony,

Officially they were 1.5kW transmitters (the GPO/BoT) limit for UK-flag vessels). In reality with a decent antenna it was quite easy to get 2kW (shush, Harry Gilder may be listening).
 

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Thanks Ron, I had a vague feeling I had heard they were 2kW but I thought it was my memory because I knew GPO regulations were 1.5 or thereabouts.
 

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I joined a Cunard managed bulker with a radio room straight from Startrek.
Ericsson Marine kit..... The tx and rx derived their fcy I. P. from a common x'tal oven.

I spent 6 months praying nothing untoward happened to that oven.

��
 

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...Officially they were 1.5kW transmitters (the GPO/BoT) limit for UK-flag vessels). In reality with a decent antenna it was quite easy to get 2kw...
Wonder how much of that on an accommodation and aerial aft VLCC ended up as wasteful eddy-current or R/O sterilisation?
 

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Just round the corner from Riversdale (where I took part II, first year being at Colwyn Bay immediately before it closed down).
 

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On my old tramps we weren't allowed more than 100W.

Troppo, in the late 1970s P&O used to fit their stations with two main receivers, two main transmitters (at least 1Kw) and one back up fully crystalled redundant old Oceanspan as Emergency transmitter. That was belt, braces and a piece of string.
In the 60's and 70's we weren't allowed more than 100w. Then I went foreign and had loads of power and synthesised frequencies. That seemed a 'great leap forward' for me.
 

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My old tramps only allowed 100W

In the 60's and 70's we weren't allowed more than 100w. Then I went foreign and had loads of power and synthesised frequencies. That seemed a 'great leap forward' for me.
 

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Now this ages me. I sailed on RMS Orion in 1954. My responsibilities included the two accident boats, each with spark transmitters. Testing the transmitters was frowned on as the multi-frequency 'raspberry' noises imposed on all receivers on the ship, on all frequencies, were 'disliked'. The morse 'noise' could cut through any opposition, on any frequency. There was a modern invention there too - a receiver using a diode valve - suspended with elastic bands because ANY vibration created a musical sonic warble. Apparently the equipment was tuned for 500 Kc/s but who knows. Good job I wasn't transmitting at 2 kWs but could only reach the horizon.
 

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Past & Present ish

Early 70’s, I had a ‘junior’ who had been an R/O during WW2, he was revalidating his ticket.
Showing him the radio room on the Governor (T J Harrison) which had O’Span VII, and Mercury/Electra rx’s.
“I suppose this is a big change to the gear you sailed with”
“NO not really”
 
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